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Japan Trade Ussr

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BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese businessmen are extending a tentative lifeline to the ailing Soviet economy even though their government has avoided wider ties pending resolution of a long-standing territorial dispute. A number of companies have signed contracts or worked behind the scenes to help the Soviets in their herculean task of converting to a market-oriented economy.
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NEWS
April 20, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese officials suggested Friday that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit here had opened the door to some economic aid from Japan, and Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu declared that he wants to visit the Soviet Union as soon as possible. Diplomats said the trip might be made in August or September after an advance visit to Moscow by Foreign Minister Taro Nakayama following the London economic summit of seven advanced industrialized democracies July 15-17.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Toshiba Machine Co., whose illegal exports to the Soviet Union drew sharp criticism from the West last year, announced Thursday that it will cut its American operations in the face of restrictions on its U.S. exports. "We understand it is only a matter of time now that the (U.S. trade) bill will be signed and take effect," said Hiroshi Yamaguchi, the company's senior spokesman. "So, whether we like it or not, we will have to trim down the U.S unit sooner or later."
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Badly needing a diplomatic triumph, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev emerged today from grueling talks with the Japanese with little better than a debacle, having failed by his own account to secure a dramatic improvement in relations or a pledge of large-scale aid for the flagging Soviet economy. "We are yet to have that breakthrough," Gorbachev acknowledged after 12 hours of often acrimonious negotiations over the past three days with the Japanese prime minister, Toshiki Kaifu.
NEWS
December 8, 1988
The Japanese government accused two companies of selling a chemical to the Soviet Union that could be used for missiles. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry accused Daikin Industries, an air conditioner manufacturer in Osaka, and Boeki Ltd., a small trading firm in Tokyo, of exporting 860 tons of high-density halogenated hydrocarbon to the Soviet Union in 1986 and 1987 without permission.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1987
Representatives from 140 groups were called in by the Japanese government and told not to repeat the mistake of Toshiba Machine, a unit of Toshiba Corp., which sold banned technology with military applications to the Soviet Union. Toshiba's violation of international rules governing sensitive exports to Soviet bloc countries has become another awkward issue in U.S.-Japan relations.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | Associated Press
Japan's trade minister, hoping to assuage American concerns about the improper diversion of technology to the Soviet Union, assured Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger Wednesday that his government was serious about preventing any recurrence.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | United Press International
The government punished two major Japanese firms with stiff trade restrictions Friday for illegally selling the Soviet Union strategic technology to help its submarines avoid detection by the U.S. Navy. The move came two days after U.S. officials traveling with Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger in Europe charged the technology transfer had a "very serious" impact on U.S. anti-submarine warfare capabilities.
NEWS
April 17, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cutting promptly to the heart of Japan's 45-year-old dispute with Moscow, Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu on Tuesday called for visiting Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to make a bold "political decision" that would recognize Japanese sovereignty over four contested islands.
NEWS
April 16, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Soviet economy in chaos and his own political position increasingly precarious, Mikhail S. Gorbachev began a historic visit to Japan today with the aim of winning billions of dollars in desperately needed aid and trade to prop up the crumbling Soviet state.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1991 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, TIMES INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
Ever since Genghis Khan, Russians have known little but trouble from Asia. Japan sank their fleet in 1905. Mao Tse-tung betrayed them. Tokyo claims Soviet-held islands, and Taiwan's and South Korea's economic successes have made old Kremlin theories look silly. While almost everyone in the Pacific Basin was taking a Chamber of Commerce view of the region, Moscow had 50 divisions deployed along the Chinese border and a massive Pacific fleet.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Japanese businessmen are extending a tentative lifeline to the ailing Soviet economy even though their government has avoided wider ties pending resolution of a long-standing territorial dispute. A number of companies have signed contracts or worked behind the scenes to help the Soviets in their herculean task of converting to a market-oriented economy.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | From United Press International
A Japanese television producer, frustrated in his attempts to communicate with counterparts in the Soviet East Asian capital of Vladivostok, gave two fax machines to the local television station in July. It was a nice try, but Hiroshi Kikuchi's gift failed to remedy the situation. When he returned to Japan, he found telephone lines were so poor he could not get through to his fax machines.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | Associated Press
The House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday approved a ban on sales of Toshiba Corp. products in military exchange stores but refused to go along with a harsher measure. An amendment proposed by Rep. Duncan L. Hunter (R-Coronado) would have broadened the sales ban to include all Defense Department contracts with the giant Japanese electronics firm and a Norwegian company. But committee members, citing possible procedural delays, refused to attach Hunter's proposal to the PX bill.
NEWS
July 15, 1987
Although "serious damage" has been done to the security of Western nations by Toshiba Machine Co.'s sale of sensitive equipment to the Soviets, the White House does not support efforts to severely restrict Toshiba's sales and operations in this country, Edward Derwinski of the State Deparment, told the House Ways and Means subcommittee on trade.
NEWS
December 8, 1988
The Japanese government accused two companies of selling a chemical to the Soviet Union that could be used for missiles. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry accused Daikin Industries, an air conditioner manufacturer in Osaka, and Boeki Ltd., a small trading firm in Tokyo, of exporting 860 tons of high-density halogenated hydrocarbon to the Soviet Union in 1986 and 1987 without permission.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1988 | From the Washington Post
In one of the costliest and most aggressive lobbying campaigns ever mounted by a foreign company, Toshiba Corp. paid $4.3 million to one law firm as part of its successful drive to blunt stiff import sanctions for its illegal sale of high-technology products to the Soviets, Justice Department records show.
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