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NEWS
December 17, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many a visitor to Japan has a horror story, or two, to tell about Narita Airport. Minutes after arriving at the gateway to this land of affluence and high technology, the typical traveler must wade through endless lines at an immigration inspection, battle ludicrous crowds to board a limousine bus and grind molars during a frustrating two-hour freeway jam to a downtown hotel. It gets worse on the trip home.
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NEWS
December 17, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-blooded Japanese railway has begun discriminating in favor of women. In a rare move, the Keio Teito Electric Railway Co. has set up special female-only train cars as a refuge this holiday season from Japan's notorious chikan, or "gropers," who squeeze more than just their way onto jampacked trains. But the policy hasn't gone down easy with some male commuters. They gripe that the segregation makes the rest of the train even more crowded for the male majority.
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SPORTS
December 19, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When this once-sleepy temple town welcomes the world to the 1998 Winter Olympics 50 days from now, Japan's charms and quirks will be displayed as nakedly as the scantily clad sumo wrestlers who will help open the Games. Cheap this spectacle will not be. Japan may set an Olympic record for spending. But in return, it hopes to generate some badly needed economic and psychological cheer when the festivities begin Feb. 7. The city and prefecture of Nagano will shell out an estimated $1.
SPORTS
December 19, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When this once-sleepy temple town welcomes the world to the 1998 Winter Olympics 50 days from now, Japan's charms and quirks will be displayed as nakedly as the scantily clad sumo wrestlers who will help open the Games. Cheap this spectacle will not be. Japan may set an Olympic record for spending. But in return, it hopes to generate some badly needed economic and psychological cheer when the festivities begin Feb. 7. The city and prefecture of Nagano will shell out an estimated $1.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-blooded Japanese railway has begun discriminating in favor of women. In a rare move, the Keio Teito Electric Railway Co. has set up special female-only train cars as a refuge this holiday season from Japan's notorious chikan, or "gropers," who squeeze more than just their way onto jampacked trains. But the policy hasn't gone down easy with some male commuters. They gripe that the segregation makes the rest of the train even more crowded for the male majority.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Passengers packed into trains and sped below ground and sea to the island of Hokkaido on Sunday as the world's longest undersea tunnel opened to rail service. Some riders had waited in line more than a week to ensure a seat on the first train, which carried them 33.4 miles from Aomori at the tip of Japan's largest island, Honshu, to Hakodate in Hokkaido, the country's northernmost main island. The undersea portion of the Seikan Tunnel runs 14.4 miles.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Key Japanese Expressway Reopens After Quake: Japanese authorities reopened the 24-mile Hanshin Expressway between Osaka and Kobe following a repair of damage from the 1995 earthquake that cost $1.3 billion. Part of the expressway was turned on its side in the devastating temblor, which caused more than 6,000 deaths. The reopening of the highway is expected to reverse a 56% decline seen in the number of Kobe visitors in the year after the 6.9 quake.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fumes near the entrance to a subway station sickened at least 31 people in the port city of Yokohama, just south of Tokyo. The victims were hospitalized for throat and eye pain. None of the injuries was serious, said Takayuki Emura of the Yokohama Fire Department. Firefighters in gas masks and protective clothing searched the Kamioka subway station for the source of the noxious odor but did not find anything.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dispute May Delay New United Route to Japan, Sydney: United Airlines said it may delay plans for a New York-Tokyo-Sydney route because of a dispute with the Japanese government. Japan has rejected United's application for the flight, scheduled to begin Oct. 25, because it would pick up Japanese passengers for travel to Sydney. Japan wants to place restrictions on the number of seats that could be filled in Tokyo to prevent competition with Japanese airlines.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Key Japanese Expressway Reopens After Quake: Japanese authorities reopened the 24-mile Hanshin Expressway between Osaka and Kobe following a repair of damage from the 1995 earthquake that cost $1.3 billion. Part of the expressway was turned on its side in the devastating temblor, which caused more than 6,000 deaths. The reopening of the highway is expected to reverse a 56% decline seen in the number of Kobe visitors in the year after the 6.9 quake.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fumes near the entrance to a subway station sickened at least 31 people in the port city of Yokohama, just south of Tokyo. The victims were hospitalized for throat and eye pain. None of the injuries was serious, said Takayuki Emura of the Yokohama Fire Department. Firefighters in gas masks and protective clothing searched the Kamioka subway station for the source of the noxious odor but did not find anything.
NEWS
January 21, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ordeal of 300,000 refugees from Japan's massive earthquake eased somewhat Friday, with relief finally flowing into the stricken port of Kobe and other devastated areas. For the first time since the Tuesday quake, deliveries of food and other relief goods increased, with aid convoys arriving in Kobe every few minutes. Grocery stores reopened, inspectors began to decree damaged buildings unsafe, and workers started carting away the rubble left by the killer temblor.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The docks are closed, the sea walls of what was once Japan's busiest international port ripped apart. Black, acrid smoke from an early morning fire still billows out of a Mitsubishi warehouse. As far as the eye can see, 50,000-pound cargo containers lie tumbled on savagely cracked pavement roads; the giant orange cranes that loaded them on ships from all over the world are idle.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dispute May Delay New United Route to Japan, Sydney: United Airlines said it may delay plans for a New York-Tokyo-Sydney route because of a dispute with the Japanese government. Japan has rejected United's application for the flight, scheduled to begin Oct. 25, because it would pick up Japanese passengers for travel to Sydney. Japan wants to place restrictions on the number of seats that could be filled in Tokyo to prevent competition with Japanese airlines.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | Associated Press
The toll in a train collision in western Japan grew to 42 dead and 402 injured Tuesday. It was the nation's deadliest railway accident in 28 years. The last body inside the crushed train cars was removed early today after a 14-hour rescue effort following the 10:35 a.m. head-on collision of a tourist train and a local train near the town of Shigaraki, 230 miles west of Tokyo, police said.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1991 | From Reuters
United Airlines was denied permission to fly a new route from Chicago to Tokyo on Tuesday, hours before a gala news conference to inaugurate the service, as Japan stepped up a tit-for-tat fight over landing rights. United did not let the decision disrupt the highly publicized news conference to launch the route, and Stephen M. Wolf, chairman of United parent UAL Corp., predicted that the dispute would be ironed out within a few days.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A packed express passenger train collided head on with a local train in western Japan, killing at least 24 people and leaving more than 375 injured, police and news reports said. An express train of the Japan Railway Co. rammed into a local train near Minaguchi, 200 miles southwest of Tokyo.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1991 | From Reuters
United Airlines was denied permission to fly a new route from Chicago to Tokyo on Tuesday, hours before a gala news conference to inaugurate the service, as Japan stepped up a tit-for-tat fight over landing rights. United did not let the decision disrupt the highly publicized news conference to launch the route, and Stephen M. Wolf, chairman of United parent UAL Corp., predicted that the dispute would be ironed out within a few days.
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