Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapan Unions
IN THE NEWS

Japan Unions

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The protracted labor dispute at the New Otani Hotel & Garden in Los Angeles eluded resolution Monday, as the hotel's Tokyo management--in a long-awaited meeting with two of its L.A.-based employees--rejected requests to rehire three fired workers and meet directly with union officials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 26, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
General Electric Co., which invested $30 billion in Japan in the last five years, said it has agreed to sell its Tokyo-based life insurance business to American International Group for about $2.15 billion. Separately, GE's biggest unions ratified a four-year contract that bars medical co-payment increases and raises pay an average of 16.5%.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 25, 1985 | Harry Bernstein
Acouple of years ago during a visit to Japan, I watched thousands of Japanese union members wildly cheering in a Tokyo stadium as their leaders promised impressive contract gains that year if the workers were willing to fight hard and go on strike if necessary. The rally was to end with a massive night march down the center of Tokyo. As the militant workers readied for the march, the cheering reached a crescendo and picket signs were waving wildly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The protracted labor dispute at the New Otani Hotel & Garden in Los Angeles eluded resolution Monday, as the hotel's Tokyo management--in a long-awaited meeting with two of its L.A.-based employees--rejected requests to rehire three fired workers and meet directly with union officials.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The foreign ministers of the Soviet Union and Japan signed financial and cultural agreements Saturday, and their governments exchanged invitations for their leaders to visit each other's countries. Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the first Soviet foreign minister to visit Japan in a decade, arrived in Tokyo on Wednesday and held four meetings with his Japanese counterpart, Shintaro Abe.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
General Electric Co., which invested $30 billion in Japan in the last five years, said it has agreed to sell its Tokyo-based life insurance business to American International Group for about $2.15 billion. Separately, GE's biggest unions ratified a four-year contract that bars medical co-payment increases and raises pay an average of 16.5%.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Strong earthquakes were reported in the Soviet Union and Japan, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. A 6.3-magnitude quake shook the Caucasus mountain range in Soviet Georgia, the same area that was devastated by an earthquake in April, and reports said at least one person was killed and 15 hospitalized. In Japan, a 5.2-magnitude quake jolted a rural area more than 200 miles north of Tokyo. No damage was reported. Meanwhile, a magnitude 6.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1986 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Trade friction between Japan and the Unites States has created an unusual alliance this year for the annual "spring labor offensive" here. The government of Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone has joined the labor unions in citing Japan's massive trade surplus as a reason for increasing wages--creating more consumer purchasing power and thus bringing in more foreign goods. "I want enterprises that can afford to do so to give high wage increases," Nakasone declared in Parliament.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1995 | From Associated Press
Japanese regulators Monday announced their plan for cleaning up a major credit union collapse, and the proposal includes a loan to be footed by Tokyo taxpayers. The Tokyo assembly must approve the loan to help Cosmo Credit Corp. But its inclusion in the plan is likely to again raise debate over whether Japanese taxpayers should help solve the nation's banking mess. Many assembly members and Tokyo Gov. Yukio Aoshima have questioned whether taxpayers should be required to pay for such bailouts.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nissan Motor Co. management today welcomed the defeat of an attempt to unionize its Tennessee plant, while Japanese unions, which were not part of the organizing effort there, said they respected the workers' vote. American workers at Nissan's Smyrna, Tenn., automobile plant voted to reject a campaign by the United Auto Workers to unionize their factory. (Story, Page 1.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1995 | From Associated Press
Japanese regulators Monday announced their plan for cleaning up a major credit union collapse, and the proposal includes a loan to be footed by Tokyo taxpayers. The Tokyo assembly must approve the loan to help Cosmo Credit Corp. But its inclusion in the plan is likely to again raise debate over whether Japanese taxpayers should help solve the nation's banking mess. Many assembly members and Tokyo Gov. Yukio Aoshima have questioned whether taxpayers should be required to pay for such bailouts.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Strong earthquakes were reported in the Soviet Union and Japan, the U.S. Geological Survey reported. A 6.3-magnitude quake shook the Caucasus mountain range in Soviet Georgia, the same area that was devastated by an earthquake in April, and reports said at least one person was killed and 15 hospitalized. In Japan, a 5.2-magnitude quake jolted a rural area more than 200 miles north of Tokyo. No damage was reported. Meanwhile, a magnitude 6.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1986 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Trade friction between Japan and the Unites States has created an unusual alliance this year for the annual "spring labor offensive" here. The government of Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone has joined the labor unions in citing Japan's massive trade surplus as a reason for increasing wages--creating more consumer purchasing power and thus bringing in more foreign goods. "I want enterprises that can afford to do so to give high wage increases," Nakasone declared in Parliament.
NEWS
January 19, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The foreign ministers of the Soviet Union and Japan signed financial and cultural agreements Saturday, and their governments exchanged invitations for their leaders to visit each other's countries. Eduard A. Shevardnadze, the first Soviet foreign minister to visit Japan in a decade, arrived in Tokyo on Wednesday and held four meetings with his Japanese counterpart, Shintaro Abe.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1985 | Harry Bernstein
Acouple of years ago during a visit to Japan, I watched thousands of Japanese union members wildly cheering in a Tokyo stadium as their leaders promised impressive contract gains that year if the workers were willing to fight hard and go on strike if necessary. The rally was to end with a massive night march down the center of Tokyo. As the militant workers readied for the march, the cheering reached a crescendo and picket signs were waving wildly.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Associated Press
Japan's labor unions Friday formed a nationwide federation in a bid to stem decades of declining membership and to rekindle their drive to shorten the 48-hour workweek and improve working conditions. Sixty-two unions from four federations merged into a single united front to try to boost the clout of a movement hurt by the apathy of an increasingly affluent and white-collar worker pool.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2005 | Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writer
After years of concerted but futile attempts to organize workers at Wal-Mart Stores Inc., union leaders are joining forces to stop the world's largest employer from exporting its low-wage jobs across the globe. In Canada, Germany and Japan, unions are using protests, the courts and political pressure to thwart the giant retailer's expansion. The effort, one of the most extensive union campaigns in modern labor history, is gathering speed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|