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Japan United States Friendship Commission

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NEWS
March 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Americans are trying harder than ever to figure out the nature of the Japanese economy and society, a small and obscure U.S. government commission has cut off the money that leading American universities have been using to buy new books published in Japan. The cutoff has touched off a furious debate over how best to come to grips with this country's chief economic rival.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1991
Understanding the subtle nuances and shifts in Japanese politics, industry and society is difficult in the best of times. Now with U.S.-Japan relations a bit edgy, keeping abreast of a changing Japan is more crucial than ever. Japanese-language books and periodicals provide valuable insight into Japan. Yet a U.S. commission chooses now, of all times, to eliminate a book-buying program for Japanese libraries at major American universities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1991
Understanding the subtle nuances and shifts in Japanese politics, industry and society is difficult in the best of times. Now with U.S.-Japan relations a bit edgy, keeping abreast of a changing Japan is more crucial than ever. Japanese-language books and periodicals provide valuable insight into Japan. Yet a U.S. commission chooses now, of all times, to eliminate a book-buying program for Japanese libraries at major American universities.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Americans are trying harder than ever to figure out the nature of the Japanese economy and society, a small and obscure U.S. government commission has cut off the money that leading American universities have been using to buy new books published in Japan. The cutoff has touched off a furious debate over how best to come to grips with this country's chief economic rival.
OPINION
May 19, 1991
Your editorial "Bashing a 'Japan-Basher' " (May 10) raises the important issue of the Japan-United States Friendship Commission's funding for university programs and professors critical of Japan. We worked for several years with the University of California at San Diego in a joint library development program and we are naturally disturbed to hear that UCSD has not been funded for next year. This is particularly true because a part of our agreement with UCSD specified that they would concentrate on contemporary materials in the fields of international relations, trade, business, economics and public policy, while UCLA focused on law, political science, sociology, modern history and related traditional fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991
Is the University of California, San Diego, being unfairly excluded from a book grant program because a faculty member is perceived in some places--especially Tokyo--as a Japan-basher? The Japan-United States Friendship Commission claims otherwise, but others question its motives for being distinctly unfriendly toward UC San Diego. The campus was the only one of 13 top U.S. universities with Japanese libraries to be denied a grant renewal.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Ed Sakamoto's "Life of the Land"--seen here in '81 at the East West Players--has found a life in New York, at the Pan Asian Repertory Theatre. It's a sequel to Sakamoto's "Manoa Valley," in which a young man leaves Hawaii for the mainland to seek his fortune. Here he returns after 20 years, not exactly burned out, but ready to settle in with his family. D. J. Bruckner of the New York Times was impressed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
The Mark Taper Forum will revive "Terra Nova" in Japan later this month. Gordon Davidson, the Taper's artistic director, will restage Ted Tally's drama--first seen here eight years ago--about a 1912 race to the South Pole. The company will present 12 performances in Tokyo, opening at the 800-seat Sunshine Theatre on May 29. Single performances in Nagoya, Kyoto and Osaka will follow, with a closing night June 13 in Yokohama.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Like an itinerant band of players, the Padua Hills Playwrights Festival is moving to its fifth location in 10 years. This year the annual assemblage of writers and actors will encamp at Chapman College in Orange from June 22 to Aug. 2. The festival has followed a circular route, from Padua Hills (near Claremont) to CalArts to the Paramount Ranch (in the Santa Monica Mountains) to Loyola and now to Orange County.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
A few "Star Trek" fans were shocked by the official revelation that actor George Takei -- aka Mr. Sulu -- is gay. But most accepted the news with the respect for diversity that devotees say is the hallmark of the sci-fi series. Takei, 68, revealed his homosexuality in the current issue of Frontiers, a biweekly Los Angeles magazine covering the gay and lesbian community.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"The Piano Lesson," a new play by August Wilson (who won this year's drama Pulitzer for "Fences"); Sam Shepard's "A Lie of the Mind"; Ron Hutchinson's adaptation of the Sinclair Lewis novel "Babbitt: A Marriage"; British playwright Anthony Minghella's "Made in Bangkok," and "The Lost Highway--The Music and Legend of Hank Williams," co-written by Randal Myler and Mark Harelik (who also created "The Immigrant") are the five new plays announced for the Mark Taper's 1987-88 season by artistic
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC San Diego, in the midst of developing an academic program in Pacific Rim studies, has been cut from a federal program to buy scholarly Japanese books and journals--ironically, after the university successfully lobbied for the continued funding of the program for 12 other universities. A UCSD professor contends the university was snubbed by the program after he denounced its directors for wanting to cut funds to all 13 universities that were beneficiaries of the Japanese book-buying program.
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