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Japan Wages And Salaries

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BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Performance-based considerations are increasingly taking the place of year-end bonuses as employers across the United States decide who's been naughty or nice at holiday time. Although a boss who substitutes an incentive program for the traditional holiday bonus risks being called a Scrooge, the trend actually reflects the Santa Claus principle of rewarding good--i.e., productive, behavior--says consultant Paul Muller.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Average wages and household spending in Japan fell in March, with the country's economic troubles hitting blue-collar workers the hardest, the government said Friday. The average monthly salary declined for the eighth straight month to $2,374, 1.5% less than last year when inflation is taken into account, the Labor Ministry said. For the fiscal year ended March 31, salaries fell 1.2%, their first decline in four years. Working-class households saw monthly salaries drop 2.
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BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Workers May Get Smaller Pay Raises: Shrinking corporate profits may force Japanese workers, among the highest paid in the world, to settle for smaller pay increases when nationwide wage negotiations end late next month or early April, economists said. However, some economists expect the continuing labor shortage to prevent any big drop in pay increases. "We expect an average pay increase of 4.9% against this fiscal year's average of 5.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Workers May Get Smaller Pay Raises: Shrinking corporate profits may force Japanese workers, among the highest paid in the world, to settle for smaller pay increases when nationwide wage negotiations end late next month or early April, economists said. However, some economists expect the continuing labor shortage to prevent any big drop in pay increases. "We expect an average pay increase of 4.9% against this fiscal year's average of 5.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Settlement of two brief strikes Thursday all but concluded Japan's annual "spring wage offensive," which is expected to bring an average increase of 5.8% for Japanese workers. Employees of nine railway companies shut down commuter service for about an hour but were back on the job in time for the morning rush. Union officials and executives of the companies had negotiated through the night. In the end, management agreed to raise wages by 6.87%, or $110.83 a month.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Performance-based incentives increasingly are taking the place of year-end bonuses when employers decide who's been naughty or nice at holiday time. Although bosses who substitute incentive programs for traditional holiday bonuses risk being called Scrooges, the trend actually reflects the Santa Claus principle of rewarding "good," meaning productive, behavior, says consultant Paul Muller.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Average wages and household spending in Japan fell in March, with the country's economic troubles hitting blue-collar workers the hardest, the government said Friday. The average monthly salary declined for the eighth straight month to $2,374, 1.5% less than last year when inflation is taken into account, the Labor Ministry said. For the fiscal year ended March 31, salaries fell 1.2%, their first decline in four years. Working-class households saw monthly salaries drop 2.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1991 | From Reuters
Though known for their long hours and dedication, workers in Japan are the least satisfied of employees in major countries with wages and job conditions, a survey released last week showed. British workers were found to be nearly as unhappy with their pay. Two out of every three employees in Japan and Britain feel they are underpaid, said Australian sociology professor Riaz Hassan, who prepared the survey in association with the International Survey Research Corp. in Chicago.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1991 | From Reuters
Though known for their long hours and dedication, workers in Japan are the least satisfied of employees in major countries with wages and job conditions, a survey released last week showed. British workers were found to be nearly as unhappy with their pay. Two out of every three employees in Japan and Britain feel they are underpaid, said Australian sociology professor Riaz Hassan, who prepared the survey in association with the International Survey Research Corp. in Chicago.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Settlement of two brief strikes Thursday all but concluded Japan's annual "spring wage offensive," which is expected to bring an average increase of 5.8% for Japanese workers. Employees of nine railway companies shut down commuter service for about an hour but were back on the job in time for the morning rush. Union officials and executives of the companies had negotiated through the night. In the end, management agreed to raise wages by 6.87%, or $110.83 a month.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
Performance-based incentives increasingly are taking the place of year-end bonuses when employers decide who's been naughty or nice at holiday time. Although bosses who substitute incentive programs for traditional holiday bonuses risk being called Scrooges, the trend actually reflects the Santa Claus principle of rewarding "good," meaning productive, behavior, says consultant Paul Muller.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Performance-based considerations are increasingly taking the place of year-end bonuses as employers across the United States decide who's been naughty or nice at holiday time. Although a boss who substitutes an incentive program for the traditional holiday bonus risks being called a Scrooge, the trend actually reflects the Santa Claus principle of rewarding good--i.e., productive, behavior--says consultant Paul Muller.
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