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NEWS
July 24, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Yellow was the color of Corazon Aquino's "people power" revolution in the Philippines three years ago. If there was a theme color in Sunday's crushing electoral defeat for Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party, it would have to be pink. Pink because the country's demure, soft-spoken women emerged from political obscurity to dominate campaign rhetoric with outrage over a new consumption tax they claimed betrayed ruling party promises and gouged their pocketbooks.
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WORLD
August 1, 2010 | By Suvendrini Kakuchi, Los Angeles Times
After 25 years working as an accounting assistant in a leading construction company, Asako Nakano decided two summers ago that she needed to stabilize her retirement plans. So she took the plunge and bought a condominium. "The decision to put almost all my savings into a home for myself was a bit daunting, but I never hesitated," said the friendly, confident single woman. "I thought to myself, I am never going to get married, so why not invest in my future? It made sense to me."
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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Japanese court awarded damages in a sexual discrimination case for the first time, giving $640,000 to 10 female workers. The women had sued the social insurance remuneration payment fund 10 years ago over its policy of promoting only males on the basis of length of service. The judge ruled that the government-affiliated agency had violated the constitution and the labor standards act. The agency said it may appeal.
NEWS
March 10, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many people, Mizuho Fukushima is quite attached to her name--and wants to remain so. When she met her prospective husband, Yuichi Kaido, more than 20 years ago, giving up her surname seemed like killing an old friend. "It just didn't seem natural," she said. In another country, she could have kept her maiden name. Or both partners could have used a hyphenated name.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When Mie Teno was hired to help a major Japanese company establish a U.S. plant, she went about the project just as any Japanese man would. She quietly cultivated allies at all levels of the corporate bureaucracy, beginning with the section chiefs and working her way to the vice presidents. Finally, with the consensus of all of them, her recommendations went to the top. Teno worried that her effectiveness might be diminished because she happened to be a woman.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
* Discrimination against girls is so great that among 45 developing countries for which recent data is available, there are only two where mortality rates for girls age 1 to 4 years are not higher than those for boys in the same age group. * In developing countries, the percentage of girls enrolled in high school has climbed from 17% of those eligible in 1970 to 36% in 1990. However, two-thirds of illiterates in the developing world are women.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1991 | From Reuters
Until a few years ago, Japan didn't even have a term for sexual harassment. But Japanese companies with businesses in the United States are starting to realize that what passes for normal at home could bring hefty legal claims abroad. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission received 115 sexual discrimination complaints against Japanese companies last year, according to Japan's Kyoei Mutual Fire and Marine insurance company.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | ELIZABETH LAZAROWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tokuko Saito will soon shove her way into a world that for more than 1,000 years has been the exclusive domain of Japan's manliest men: She is training to be a sumo wrestler. At 5 feet 3 inches, 154 pounds and 45 years of age, Saito hardly inspires comparison to male wrestlers, 300-pound-plus mountains of nearly naked flesh. Undeterred, she will strap on the wide sumo belt--over shorts and a leotard--and step into the ring later this month for the first All-Japan Women's Sumo Competition.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
At a New Year's cocktail party early last year, a high-ranking official of the Japan Socialist Party was overheard to dismiss words of praise for his party's charismatic chairwoman, Takako Doi. "She may have charisma power," the man said, "but she's a little short on brain power."
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-blooded Japanese railway has begun discriminating in favor of women. In a rare move, the Keio Teito Electric Railway Co. has set up special female-only train cars as a refuge this holiday season from Japan's notorious chikan, or "gropers," who squeeze more than just their way onto jampacked trains. But the policy hasn't gone down easy with some male commuters. They gripe that the segregation makes the rest of the train even more crowded for the male majority.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A blue-blooded Japanese railway has begun discriminating in favor of women. In a rare move, the Keio Teito Electric Railway Co. has set up special female-only train cars as a refuge this holiday season from Japan's notorious chikan, or "gropers," who squeeze more than just their way onto jampacked trains. But the policy hasn't gone down easy with some male commuters. They gripe that the segregation makes the rest of the train even more crowded for the male majority.
NEWS
August 30, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier this year, a random sampling of "women only" classified job postings in major Japanese newspapers was limited mostly to low-end positions for nurses, housekeepers, textile workers and food-service employees. "We need many more women," proclaimed one railway noodle stand company in the March 18 edition of the Asahi Shimbun newspaper. "We need women under 25," said a more specific posting for secretaries in the Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan's largest newspaper.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan decided Wednesday that it will legalize the birth control pill, 34 years after the contraceptive was first submitted for approval and less than five months after Viagra gained rapid permission for sale here. But more than three decades of propaganda about the dangers of the pill may discourage many Japanese women from using it when marketing begins in the autumn, family planning experts said. In a newspaper poll last year, only 7.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | From a Times staff writer
North Korea on Thursday gave Japan a list of 10 to 15 Japanese women who will be allowed to visit their native land for the first time after emigrating to North Korea decades ago. About 1,830 Japanese wives accompanied their husbands to North Korea between 1959 and 1982, and many have never been heard from again. The issue has been a sore point between Japan and North Korea, but Tokyo this week announced that it was resuming food aid to its hungry neighbor after an agreement was struck Sept.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government said it doesn't plan to apologize or compensate more than 16,000 disabled women who were forcibly sterilized over five decades. The program was legal at the time and documented in public records, the government said. An official said the government does not plan to further investigate the program. Japan legalized sterilization in 1948. Under the law, revoked last year, doctors did not need consent to sterilize the mentally or physically disabled.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | From the Washington Post
A Japanese court has ruled in favor of a 33-year-old woman who divorced her husband after he demanded that every day she cook him breakfast, press his pants and clean the house. The woman worked full time, but the husband said it was the wife's job to do all the housework. The husband, a 35-year-old public servant, filed a lawsuit demanding that his wife pay him about $38,000 in damages because she did not live up to her end of the marriage arrangement.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | From the Washington Post
A Japanese court has ruled in favor of a 33-year-old woman who divorced her husband after he demanded that every day she cook him breakfast, press his pants and clean the house. The woman worked full time, but the husband said it was the wife's job to do all the housework. The husband, a 35-year-old public servant, filed a lawsuit demanding that his wife pay him about $38,000 in damages because she did not live up to her end of the marriage arrangement.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Kumi Sato and many other women in Japan, 1987 was supposed to mark the beginning of a period of expanded opportunity for females in the work force. After all, Japan's legislature had just passed a law prohibiting sex discrimination in employment, and much of the Japanese media had begun to suggest that the late 1980s and the 1990s would be the Onna-no Jidai, or "Era of Women." Sato's life certainly changed.
NEWS
July 23, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the annals of Japanese samurai history, few names ring with such glittering tradition as the Tokugawa. The powerful clan unified the nation in 1603 after 100 years of rapacious civil war, provided an unbroken string of 15 shogun rulers for nearly three centuries and symbolized the pervasive influence of ie, the male-led family lineage system.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several times a week, they scour this city's teen shopping havens, armed with portable telephones, beepers and up to $500 in monthly spending money. For Nozomi Seko and Japanese high school girls like her, the mission is clear: to be the first to find the greatest new gizmo, cutest fashion, best restaurant, hottest new hobby--and to spread the word via a far-flung network of 1,000 or more friends. According to their recent intelligence reports, Fendi is in, Vuitton is fading.
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