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April 13, 1992 | DAVID HULEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a smoky, noisy roadhouse 3,500 miles from home, Noriko Morioka watches the snow falling outside and sighs. Nothing much to do but sit back down with her two friends and order another beer. Back home in Tokyo, all three are dental assistants. This week they are tourists.
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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | DAVID HULEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a smoky, noisy roadhouse 3,500 miles from home, Noriko Morioka watches the snow falling outside and sighs. Nothing much to do but sit back down with her two friends and order another beer. Back home in Tokyo, all three are dental assistants. This week they are tourists.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1994
Why are 2,000 Alaskan cannery workers of Filipino, Samoan, Chinese, Japanese and Alaska Native descent unable to seek all the protections provided by the Civil Rights Act of 1991? Because the state's two senators--Republicans Frank H. Murkowski and Ted Stevens--succeeded in attaching to the act an amendment that bars the workers from suing the Wards Cove Co. cannery for alleged discriminatory employment practices. Congress was derelict in agreeing to this egregious exemption.
OPINION
March 21, 1993
In the final days before the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1991, one company and only one--Wards Cove Packing Co.--got an exemption in the legislation. This extraordinary dodge by Congress unjustly denied Asian-Pacific-American and native Alaskan cannery workers the opportunity to seek judicial remedies that the 1991 legislation makes available to other Americans. Rep. Jim McDermott (D-Wash.) recently introduced a bill to end this exemption. It's needed. Here's the background.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991 | STEWART KWOH, Stewart Kwoh is executive director of the Asian Pacific American Legal Center of Southern California
Asian-Americans are sometimes perceived to be ambivalent on affirmative action. One reason for this ambivalence is that Asian-Americans are often not included in such programs or are victims of unfair application. A little-known and highly disturbing flaw in the Civil Rights Act of 1991, passed earlier this month, points this out. The legislation overturns several recent Supreme Court decisions that made it harder for workers to sue employers for job discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993 | GORDON SAKAMOTO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At a time when anti-Japanese sentiment was at its peak during World War II, a small group of Japanese-American volunteers participated in highly secret missions that helped turn the tide in the fight against the land of their ancestors. Second-generation Japanese-Americans, or Nisei, were taken into the Military Intelligence Service and were considered a secret weapon in the war against Japan.
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