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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1990
The superintendent of the Las Virgenes Unified School District, whose reference to "slant-eyed" Chinese during a recent public appearance prompted an inquiry by the Japanese American Citizens League, apologized Tuesday night at a Board of Education meeting. In a brief prepared statement, Superintendent Albert D.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emiko Omori's "Rabbit in the Moon" is arguably the most comprehensive and illuminating documentary yet on the internment of Japanese Americans in the wake of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It takes its curious title from a Japanese tradition that envisions the lunar landscape as a rabbit pounding sweet rice. Omori's older sister (and co-producer) Chizuko, who is the film's key figure, further explains that when she sees a full moon she sees a smiling man. She likens the U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1992
I resent the use of the hyphen when describing Americans of Asian ancestry. I am not a hyphenated American. I am as American as any other, but I am an American who is of Japanese ancestry. I am disturbed with the picture that the article paints. Yes, there are differences and historic friction between our communities. However, it appears that The Times chooses to focus on the differences, conflicts and misunderstandings within the Asian American community rather than on the opportunities we make for ourselves to seek common ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995
We Japanese American veterans wish to respond to "A Half-Century Wait for an Apology" (Community Comment, March 13). Frank Emi, a convicted Japanese American World War II draft resister, relates his "battle for recognition." Quoting Emi, "I just thought they (the Japanese American Citizens League) were pretty disgusting to bend over backward to accommodate the white majority." After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, all Japanese aliens and Japanese American citizens who resided in the Sixth Army Area Western Defense Command were forced into concentration camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
Senate approval last week of reparations for Japanese-Americans who were interned during World War II was a long-awaited triumph for a national group that has worked for the bill's passage, the Japanese-American Citizens League. "It's marvelous, splendid; I am simply delighted that the Senate passed the bill," said Hitoshi Kajihara, president of the San Francisco-based league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The superintendent of the Las Virgenes Unified School District, whose reference to "slant-eyed" Chinese during a recent public appearance prompted an inquiry by the Japanese American Citizens League, apologized Tuesday night at a Board of Education meeting. In a brief prepared statement, Supt. Albert D.
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | BARBARA BAIRD, Times Staff Writer
After a heated public hearing in which Japanese-American groups attacked the name of the j.a.p.s.s. hair salon as "a disgusting racial slur," the West Hollywood City Council has asked City Atty. Michael Jenkins for a legal opinion on what can be done to resolve the conflict. But Mayor John Heilman said the city may be unable to intervene because the owners' constitutional right to freedom of speech may protect their selection of a name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995
We Japanese American veterans wish to respond to "A Half-Century Wait for an Apology" (Community Comment, March 13). Frank Emi, a convicted Japanese American World War II draft resister, relates his "battle for recognition." Quoting Emi, "I just thought they (the Japanese American Citizens League) were pretty disgusting to bend over backward to accommodate the white majority." After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, all Japanese aliens and Japanese American citizens who resided in the Sixth Army Area Western Defense Command were forced into concentration camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991
The passing of Mike Masaru Masaoka on June 26 should be noted. Described by Readers Digest as "Washington's most successful lobbyist" and commended by President Nixon for his "exceptional service to others in the finest American tradition," Mike's life was a source of strength for all of us. He turned down munificent offers to be a lobbyist for commercial interests to remain in the service of the Japanese American Citizens League at the small salary...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995
In January, 1944, at the urging of the Japanese American Citizens League, the U.S. government subjected 120,000 Japanese Americans who had been in concentration camps since 1942 to the draft. About 315 internees, supported by the Fair Play Committee of the Heart Mountain, Wyo., camp, refused to fight for their country while deprived of their basic rights and freedoms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995
In January, 1944, at the urging of the Japanese American Citizens League, the U.S. government subjected 120,000 Japanese Americans who had been in concentration camps since 1942 to the draft. About 315 internees, supported by the Fair Play Committee of the Heart Mountain, Wyo., camp, refused to fight for their country while deprived of their basic rights and freedoms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1992
I resent the use of the hyphen when describing Americans of Asian ancestry. I am not a hyphenated American. I am as American as any other, but I am an American who is of Japanese ancestry. I am disturbed with the picture that the article paints. Yes, there are differences and historic friction between our communities. However, it appears that The Times chooses to focus on the differences, conflicts and misunderstandings within the Asian American community rather than on the opportunities we make for ourselves to seek common ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991
The passing of Mike Masaru Masaoka on June 26 should be noted. Described by Readers Digest as "Washington's most successful lobbyist" and commended by President Nixon for his "exceptional service to others in the finest American tradition," Mike's life was a source of strength for all of us. He turned down munificent offers to be a lobbyist for commercial interests to remain in the service of the Japanese American Citizens League at the small salary...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1990
The superintendent of the Las Virgenes Unified School District, whose reference to "slant-eyed" Chinese during a recent public appearance prompted an inquiry by the Japanese American Citizens League, apologized Tuesday night at a Board of Education meeting. In a brief prepared statement, Superintendent Albert D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The superintendent of the Las Virgenes Unified School District, whose reference to "slant-eyed" Chinese during a recent public appearance prompted an inquiry by the Japanese American Citizens League, apologized Tuesday night at a Board of Education meeting. In a brief prepared statement, Supt. Albert D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
Senate approval last week of reparations for Japanese-Americans who were interned during World War II was a long-awaited triumph for a national group that has worked for the bill's passage, the Japanese-American Citizens League. "It's marvelous, splendid; I am simply delighted that the Senate passed the bill," said Hitoshi Kajihara, president of the San Francisco-based league.
NEWS
April 29, 1986 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Led by the tearful testimony of a congressman and a senator, a group of Japanese-Americans strongly backed legislation Monday that would give $20,000 to each of 60,000 survivors who were forcibly detained at internment camps during World War II. "We were loyal American citizens . . . taken from our home," California Rep. Robert T.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emiko Omori's "Rabbit in the Moon" is arguably the most comprehensive and illuminating documentary yet on the internment of Japanese Americans in the wake of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It takes its curious title from a Japanese tradition that envisions the lunar landscape as a rabbit pounding sweet rice. Omori's older sister (and co-producer) Chizuko, who is the film's key figure, further explains that when she sees a full moon she sees a smiling man. She likens the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1987 | GENE YASUDA, Times Staff Writer
Moto Asakawa was 27 that spring of 1942. He and his family had toiled long hours, day after day, planting carrots, celery and spinach on their 30 acres in Mission Valley. The hard labor was finally done, and all that remained was a wait to reap the harvest. He never got the chance.
NEWS
April 29, 1986 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Led by the tearful testimony of a congressman and a senator, a group of Japanese-Americans strongly backed legislation Monday that would give $20,000 to each of 60,000 survivors who were forcibly detained at internment camps during World War II. "We were loyal American citizens . . . taken from our home," California Rep. Robert T.
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