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Japanese American Cultural Community Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2007 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Enjoying chili rice, Asian hip-hop and traditional martial arts, Japanese Americans threw a daylong party in Little Tokyo on Saturday to reassert their cultural identity and rebuild cohesion amid the powerful forces of assimilation and gentrification. In demographic trends familiar to other established ethnic groups, Japanese Americans, known as Nikkei, are increasingly intermarrying, moving to the suburbs and loosening their ethnic affiliations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The L.A. Festival's continuing financial deficit has affected at least one other Los Angeles arts organization--the downtown Japanese American Cultural and Community Center. As a result of the festival's 9-month-old unpaid bills, JACCC executives said this week that they are experiencing minor "cash-flow problems." Gerald Yoshitomi, JACCC executive director, said that an unspecified debt for two JACCC-L.A.
HOME & GARDEN
May 8, 2003 | David Colker
Hidden behind the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center downtown is a serene, beautifully maintained garden with paths that wind through stalks of bamboo, rare pine trees, azaleas and ferns. They lead over wooden bridges, past stone lanterns and moss-covered stones. The garden is a lovely respite from city life. But it's also a reminder of the struggles of immigrants.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2007 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Enjoying chili rice, Asian hip-hop and traditional martial arts, Japanese Americans threw a daylong party in Little Tokyo on Saturday to reassert their cultural identity and rebuild cohesion amid the powerful forces of assimilation and gentrification. In demographic trends familiar to other established ethnic groups, Japanese Americans, known as Nikkei, are increasingly intermarrying, moving to the suburbs and loosening their ethnic affiliations.
HOME & GARDEN
May 8, 2003 | David Colker
Hidden behind the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center downtown is a serene, beautifully maintained garden with paths that wind through stalks of bamboo, rare pine trees, azaleas and ferns. They lead over wooden bridges, past stone lanterns and moss-covered stones. The garden is a lovely respite from city life. But it's also a reminder of the struggles of immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
When you least expect it -- and perhaps most need it -- the underground garden pops out of nowhere in the center of the busy city. The James Irvine Garden has both startled and soothed passersby in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles for 23 years. A wall of coast redwoods framed by Japanese black pine trees separates it from a high-rise next door.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
Gerald Yoshitomi is like the Isamu Noguchi sculpture that rises in the sprawling plaza outside his office window: quiet, regal and he commands one heck of a lot of territory. As the executive director of the $14-million Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, Yoshitomi heads the largest ethnic cultural center in California. But Yoshitomi's domain extends far beyond Little Tokyo.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 1 p.m. Sunday, there wasn't enough breeze to budge the balloon arches that festooned the plaza at the Japan American Culture Center in downtown Los Angeles. It was hot outdoors, verging on beastly. And Jack Shakely, director of the California Community Foundation, was worried. The free, multicultural festival scheduled from 1 to 5 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
When you least expect it -- and perhaps most need it -- the underground garden pops out of nowhere in the center of the busy city. The James Irvine Garden has both startled and soothed passersby in the Little Tokyo section of Los Angeles for 23 years. A wall of coast redwoods framed by Japanese black pine trees separates it from a high-rise next door.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The L.A. Festival's continuing financial deficit has affected at least one other Los Angeles arts organization--the downtown Japanese American Cultural and Community Center. As a result of the festival's 9-month-old unpaid bills, JACCC executives said this week that they are experiencing minor "cash-flow problems." Gerald Yoshitomi, JACCC executive director, said that an unspecified debt for two JACCC-L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1990 | JAN BRESLAUER
Gerald Yoshitomi is like the Isamu Noguchi sculpture that rises in the sprawling plaza outside his office window: quiet, regal and he commands one heck of a lot of territory. As the executive director of the $14-million Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, Yoshitomi heads the largest ethnic cultural center in California. But Yoshitomi's domain extends far beyond Little Tokyo.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 1 p.m. Sunday, there wasn't enough breeze to budge the balloon arches that festooned the plaza at the Japan American Culture Center in downtown Los Angeles. It was hot outdoors, verging on beastly. And Jack Shakely, director of the California Community Foundation, was worried. The free, multicultural festival scheduled from 1 to 5 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Japanese American veterans of the Korean War gathered in Little Tokyo on Saturday for the unveiling of a memorial wall honoring their fallen comrades, who died more than four decades ago in what has become known as this country's "forgotten war." "If heroism is measured by the sacrifice of life, then our true heroes are the ones who have their names etched on the memorial wall we're dedicating today," said Bob Wada, president of the Japanese American Korean War Veterans.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1999
Children can celebrate the Japanese New Year in a special arts workshop at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center on Dec. 28 and 29 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Activities for ages 6 to 11 include dragon decorating, learning about Japanese New Year traditions, games and printing nenga-jo, or New Year's greetings. The center is at 244 S. San Pedro St., Los Angeles. Admission is $20; $15 for members. Information: (213) 628-2725.
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