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Japanese American Internees

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1988
The Senate vote to make payments and apologies to Japanese-Americans for their unconstitutional detention during World War II is welcome and long overdue. What a shame some legislators must criticize the cost of the vote and mention budget deficits. The puny amount allotted to each survivor scarcely begins to pay for the lost years, the racism, and the service they have given to the United States. As for Helms and his continued association of Japanese-Americans with Pearl Harbor: He needs a few years in solitary at Manzanar.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Every morning, she climbed the wide marble steps of the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga was not trained for this work. She was a homemaker, not a historian. But she had a lifetime of simmering anger and unanswered questions. By lamplight in the grand reading room, she scoured thousands of documents, inventing her own organizing system to keep track of the information she found. She brought home so many copies that she commandeered a bathtub and used it as a filing cabinet.
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NEWS
August 5, 1992
Frank Yatsu, 108, one of the oldest of the Japanese-Americans interned during World War II. Yatsu was among 120,000 Japanese-Americans rounded up and sent to internment camps in 1942 after the Japanese raid on Pearl Harbor. He also was one of the first internees to receive an apology and $20,000 check from the U.S. government in 1990. Two years earlier, Congress had passed a bill apologizing for the internment and authorizing the $20,000 payments to survivors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2011 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Seventy years after they were forced into internment camps during World War II, 20 former Japanese American Santa Ana College students will be recognized with honorary degrees Friday during the campus' graduation ceremony. The 20 — some living, others deceased — are among more than 1,000 Japanese Americans who have received such recognition from 32 schools under a 2009 law that requires California's public colleges and universities to bestow honorary degrees on former students who had their educations interrupted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1997 | SCOTT STEEPLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two Ventura County Republican legislators clashed Friday over a resolution declaring Feb. 19 as a day of remembrance of Japanese Americans sent to relocation centers during World War II. On one side was Oxnard Assemblyman Nao Takasugi, the first Asian American elected to the state Legislature, and a former internee at the Gila River Relocation Center in Arizona.
NEWS
June 7, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Winding up the last full day of California primary campaigning with his focus set firmly on November, Vice President George Bush reached out Monday to the state's ethnic population by declaring his support for the payment of reparations to Japanese-Americans interned in prison camps during World War II. "It is only fair," Bush pronounced, "that our country provide apologies and reparations to those innocent Japanese-Americans who suffered as a result of their internment."
SPORTS
October 19, 2009 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
When politics, race or religion prevents people from talking or even shaking hands, it's left to sports competition to save the day. And so it was, 65 years ago, in the middle of World War II, that courage and what was right came through on a makeshift high school football field in Manzanar, Calif., in the Owens Valley. Manzanar High School, made up of sons and daughters of Japanese Americans interned by Executive Order 9066 signed by President Franklin Roosevelt, played their first and only interscholastic athletic event, a football game against Big Pine High on Oct. 25, 1944.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
On an uninviting swatch of arid desert, marked by sagebrush and mesquite trees just east of the California border, the winds of war blew together the fates of two beleaguered peoples. In a now familiar tale, 120,000 Japanese Americans were removed from the West Coast and relocated to internment camps after Japan's 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the subsequent U.S. entry into World War II. But in a little known piece of that history, the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
THESE long-ago games don't show up in baseball's official records. They are preserved in the memories of men and women who are very old now, and in the speckled black-and-white photos that survive from that time: shots of sheepish young men showing off their batting stance or a boy caressing a favorite bat, of crowds squeezing around the crude infields for a better view of the game, of a lanky kid kicking up dust as he slides hard into home. Americana, 1940s vintage.
BOOKS
January 13, 2002 | TOM ENGELHARDT
EMPIRES ON THE PACIFIC: World War II and the Struggle for the Mastery of Asia By Robert Smith Thompson, Basic Books: 434 pp., $30 FREE TO DIE : FOR THEIR COUNTRY, The Story of the Japanese American Draft Resisters in World War II, By Eric L. Muller, University of Chicago Press: 230 pp., $27.50 On Sept. 2, 1945, an armada of almost 260 Allied warships lay at anchor in Tokyo Bay. Aboard the battleship Missouri, Allied generals and admirals, including Douglas MacArthur, William F.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | JEAN H. LEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty years after her husband returned from Vietnam in a flag-draped casket, his dog tags encrusted with blood, Barbara Sonneborn woke up one morning determined to write about her grief. Those first words begun as a letter to her husband became the award-winning documentary "Regret to Inform," a poetic and powerful memoir that considers the legacy of the Vietnam War for widows on both sides of the conflict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For human rights activist Grace Shimizu, it was the 1990 reunion of Peruvian Japanese internees in San Francisco that sparked what has become an eight-year "labor of love" to win justice for them. Her passion has turned a good portion of her El Cerritos home, which she shares with her aging parents, into an office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday issued an official apology and the federal government pledged payments of $5,000 to each of the more than 2,200 people of Japanese ancestry who were taken from their Latin American homes during World War II and imprisoned in U.S. internment camps. The statement and the promised compensation are designed to close a disturbing, if little known, chapter in the nation's history. As anti-Japanese fervor mounted during the war, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to settle unfinished business, a delegation of Japanese Americans left for Washington, D.C., on Tuesday to lobby Congress for redress for Latin Americans of Japanese descent who were detained and forced into U.S. prison camps during World War II. The delegation also plans to lobby on behalf of Japanese American railroad and mine workers who, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, were abruptly fired from jobs.
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