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September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories are clear as the sky over San Fernando 60-some years ago, the words sharp as the overhand curveball he threw for three decades from mounds throughout California. The man who was king of the Aces peers out from behind a podium and offers a gentle smile. Before him sits a rapt audience, several teams of third- and fourth-generation Japanese American ballplayers who have just completed a Labor Day tournament in Woodland Hills without realizing the rich tradition they are perpetuating.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the days of 6-foot centers, two-handed set shots and three-man weaves, Wataru "Wat" Misaka--all 5 feet, 7 inches of him--emerged as a defensive standout on University of Utah basketball teams that captured two national championships. He was the New York Knicks' No. 1 pick in 1947, but was cut after only three games, ending his pro basketball career. Anti-Japanese sentiment after World War II may have had more to do with his short career than his playing ability. Still, he made a mark.
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NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The time is coming, Kerry Nakagawa believes, when any fan visiting the national baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., will be able to learn about the leagues started by first-generation Japanese Americans and how baseball was the pastime of choice at World War II internment camps. For now, the 43-year-old documentary filmmaker is spreading the word through an exhibit on display at Herbst Exhibition Hall in the San Francisco Presidio.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The time is coming, Kerry Nakagawa believes, when any fan visiting the national baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., will be able to learn about the leagues started by first-generation Japanese Americans and how baseball was the pastime of choice at World War II internment camps. For now, the 43-year-old documentary filmmaker is spreading the word through an exhibit on display at Herbst Exhibition Hall in the San Francisco Presidio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the days of 6-foot centers, two-handed set shots and three-man weaves, Wataru "Wat" Misaka--all 5 feet, 7 inches of him--emerged as a defensive standout on University of Utah basketball teams that captured two national championships. He was the New York Knicks' No. 1 pick in 1947, but was cut after only three games, ending his pro basketball career. Anti-Japanese sentiment after World War II may have had more to do with his short career than his playing ability. Still, he made a mark.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories are clear as the sky over San Fernando 60-some years ago, the words sharp as the overhand curveball he threw for three decades from mounds throughout California. The man who was king of the Aces peers out from behind a podium and offers a gentle smile. Before him sits a rapt audience, several teams of third- and fourth-generation Japanese American ballplayers who have just completed a Labor Day tournament in Woodland Hills without realizing the rich tradition they are perpetuating.
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