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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's just a piece of paper, a graying Ruth Matsuda started off humbly. But the high school diploma the 71-year-old Garden Grove woman will receive Thursday from Anaheim High School, 52 years late, helps heal a wound, she said. She and former classmate Toru Sugita, 72, would have graduated from Anaheim High in the mid-1940s. But halfway through their high school education, war broke out in the Pacific.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's just a piece of paper, a graying Ruth Matsuda started off humbly. But the high school diploma the 71-year-old Garden Grove woman will receive Thursday from Anaheim High School, 52 years late, helps heal a wound, she said. She and former classmate Toru Sugita, 72, would have graduated from Anaheim High in the mid-1940s. But halfway through their high school education, war broke out in the Pacific.
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NEWS
December 9, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the relief of Japanese-Americans, Pearl Harbor Day passed without incident despite fears that the intense focus on the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack could trigger hate crimes or other animosities toward Asians in America. "Our office was quiet yesterday, which was really comforting," Jimmy Tokeshi, head of the Japanese American Citizens League in Los Angeles, said Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a lovely day in Southern California, in the parking lot of a Wendy's, Denise Uyehara's grandmother sat behind the wheel of her car, doused the dashboard with gasoline and lit a match. She and her deceased husband had survived the Japanese internment camps of World War II and had rebuilt their lives. They used to slow dance, late at night, to music from a radio they kept in their grocery store.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 50 years after the fact, the Assembly halted its law-making business Tuesday and debated an issue that still tears at the fabric of California--how to explain the mass roundup and detention of Japanese and Japanese-Americans during World War II. After more than an hour of reminiscences and public repentance, legislators voted overwhelmingly to reject a resolution by Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) describing the detentions as militarily justified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A squabble between federal officials and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power over water rights and land costs could threaten plans to establish a national historic site at Manzanar, the barren Eastern Sierra desert home of one of the first World War II internment camps for Japanese-Americans. Two members of the California delegation, Reps. Mel Levine (D-Santa Monica) and Norman Y.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1997 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a lovely day in Southern California, in the parking lot of a Wendy's, Denise Uyehara's grandmother sat behind the wheel of her car, doused the dashboard with gasoline and lit a match. She and her deceased husband had survived the Japanese internment camps of World War II and had rebuilt their lives. They used to slow dance, late at night, to music from a radio they kept in their grocery store.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
Here's a story about our past and our present. I can't claim that it means a great deal, but this story intrigues me because it involves a certain recurrent pathology. A pathology that, as far as I know, is peculiar to Southern California. It begins with Manzanar, the Japanese-American relocation center that held 10,000 internees during World War II. Several weeks ago, we discussed in this space the likelihood that Manzanar would become a National Historic Site.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 50 years after the fact, the Assembly halted its lawmaking business Tuesday and debated an issue that still tears at the fabric of California--how to explain the mass roundup and detention of Japanese-Americans in World War II. After more than an hour of reminiscences and public repentance, legislators voted overwhelmingly to reject a resolution by Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) describing the detention operation as militarily justified.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
Manzanar is easy to miss. If you're roaring up the Owens Valley on U.S. 395, you can zip by some small stone huts on the left and never know you just passed the remains of the nation's most famous concentration camp. That's because, aside from those huts, the site of the camp has been wiped clean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1995 | RENEE TAWA and JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Abandoning his stern demeanor in the O.J. Simpson trial, Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito struggled to control his emotions Thursday as he described his family's experiences while held behind barbed wire in bleak internment camps during World War II. Ito, whose parents met at the Heart Mountain, Wyo., internment camp, told how after the war, they took him on a tour of the German Nazis' Dachau concentration camp, an experience he called "one of the most profoundly moving" of his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1995 | TIM MAY
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will trade land used as an internment camp for Japanese Americans during World War II to the federal government for property elsewhere. The trade will make possible restoration of the 500-acre site of the former Manzanar War Relocation Center, located about 200 miles north of Los Angeles in Inyo County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alien hardships Made bearable by the hope I hold for my children .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
Nisei Week was drawing to a close Saturday when I visited the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo. Little Tokyo seemed to be the perfect place to see the dangers of the political campaigns against illegal immigration being waged by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer and many other politicians. Wilson has proposed a tough package. He has called for refusing citizenship to U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1992 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese-Americans interned at Manzanar Relocation Center during World War II paid their final respects Tuesday to a long-time friend: Ralph Lazo, the only non-Japanese interned at the camp, who died on New Year's Day. "He was my friend for 50 years," said Mary Kinoshito of Sun Valley, who gathered with about 50 of Lazo's family members, friends and former co-workers at a graveside service in heavy rain Tuesday at Glen Haven Memorial Park in Kagel Canyon. "I was his neighbor at Manzanar."
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the relief of Japanese-Americans, Pearl Harbor Day passed without incident despite fears that the intense focus on the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack could trigger hate crimes or other animosities toward Asians in America. "Our office was quiet yesterday, which was really comforting," Jimmy Tokeshi, head of the Japanese American Citizens League in Los Angeles, said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
Nisei Week was drawing to a close Saturday when I visited the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo. Little Tokyo seemed to be the perfect place to see the dangers of the political campaigns against illegal immigration being waged by Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer and many other politicians. Wilson has proposed a tough package. He has called for refusing citizenship to U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alien hardships Made bearable by the hope I hold for my children .
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
Here's a story about our past and our present. I can't claim that it means a great deal, but this story intrigues me because it involves a certain recurrent pathology. A pathology that, as far as I know, is peculiar to Southern California. It begins with Manzanar, the Japanese-American relocation center that held 10,000 internees during World War II. Several weeks ago, we discussed in this space the likelihood that Manzanar would become a National Historic Site.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | ROBERT A. JONES
Manzanar is easy to miss. If you're roaring up the Owens Valley on U.S. 395, you can zip by some small stone huts on the left and never know you just passed the remains of the nation's most famous concentration camp. That's because, aside from those huts, the site of the camp has been wiped clean.
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