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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
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NEWS
April 11, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
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NEWS
April 11, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories are clear as the sky over San Fernando 60-some years ago, the words sharp as the overhand curveball he threw for three decades from mounds throughout California. The man who was king of the Aces peers out from behind a podium and offers a gentle smile. Before him sits a rapt audience, several teams of third- and fourth-generation Japanese American ballplayers who have just completed a Labor Day tournament in Woodland Hills without realizing the rich tradition they are perpetuating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1993 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lovingly restored former Buddhist temple that houses the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo is among downtown's quirkiest and most charming corners, but it's about as authentically Japanese as the Egyptian Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992
Re Pete Earley's latest book, "The Hot House," (Feb. 16): The Bureau of Prisons believes that the public should be made aware of several facts. Specifically, the book gives the average citizen an interesting but narrow view of life and work in a high-security prison. It's a good book as far as it goes--catering to America's fascination with the criminal extreme. But it falls short in several areas, distorting a great deal of the picture it attempts to portray. Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1995 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stretch of 13 buildings along and near East 1st Street in Los Angeles' Little Tokyo has been named a National Historic Landmark, overcoming earlier fears that the Northridge earthquake might have too badly harmed that cradle of Japanese American culture.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Fujishige family began farming their strawberry field, property in the area was being hawked for cases of whiskey, and Richard Nixon's brother would one day be serving up burgers next door. Those were the days when rows of eucalyptus trees formed wind breaks across Katella Avenue, just south of where Disneyland now stands, and the city was known for its orange groves and not yet as the home of Mickey Mouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The internationally acclaimed architect who designed the new pavilion at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo gave a preview Thursday of the $22-million facility, which is scheduled to open in January. "This museum is much more than a museum for people to view the exhibits," said Gyo Obata, 75, a second-generation Japanese American best known for his design of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The internationally acclaimed architect who designed the new pavilion at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo gave a preview Thursday of the $22-million facility, which is scheduled to open in January. "This museum is much more than a museum for people to view the exhibits," said Gyo Obata, 75, a second-generation Japanese American best known for his design of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The time is coming, Kerry Nakagawa believes, when any fan visiting the national baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., will be able to learn about the leagues started by first-generation Japanese Americans and how baseball was the pastime of choice at World War II internment camps. For now, the 43-year-old documentary filmmaker is spreading the word through an exhibit on display at Herbst Exhibition Hall in the San Francisco Presidio.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE HENSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memories are clear as the sky over San Fernando 60-some years ago, the words sharp as the overhand curveball he threw for three decades from mounds throughout California. The man who was king of the Aces peers out from behind a podium and offers a gentle smile. Before him sits a rapt audience, several teams of third- and fourth-generation Japanese American ballplayers who have just completed a Labor Day tournament in Woodland Hills without realizing the rich tradition they are perpetuating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1996 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alice Hirata came for the dancing. Art Endo was drawn by the drums. And for Fred Carrizosa, it was an opportunity to have a good meal and see old friends. The three were among hundreds who gathered Sunday under a scorching sun to partake in the annual Obon festival, a Buddhist gathering considered one of the most important observances of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1996
It was an unusual pairing: a nationally renowned museum noted for its exhibitions about relocation of Japanese Americans during World War II and the staff of an offbeat 'zine published by three young Asian Americans. The Japanese American National Museum and Giant Robot magazine teamed up to throw an outdoor party in Little Tokyo on Thursday aimed at bridging the generation gap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1995 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A stretch of 13 buildings along and near East 1st Street in Los Angeles' Little Tokyo has been named a National Historic Landmark, overcoming earlier fears that the Northridge earthquake might have too badly harmed that cradle of Japanese American culture.
NEWS
December 31, 1988 | ANNE Z. COOKE
Don't sweep your house on New Year's Day, an ancient Japanese belief admonishes. Or run the vacuum cleaner and dishwasher, one might also assume. According to time-honored custom, the Japanese gods of good luck will be slipping into your home Sunday morning bringing peace and good fortune for another year. And they're easily frightened away by excessive domestic bustle. So leave the remains of tonight's jollity in peace and quiet and celebrate New Year's Day the traditional Japanese way.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | NANCY MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fifteen minutes before Little Tokyo's Amerasia Bookstore opens for its last weekend of business, owner Gary Sumida's phone rings. It's author John Tsukano, who has just arrived from Florida bearing four cartons of his book "Bridge of Love." "This is a tragedy, a tragedy!" Tsukano bellows when he arrives at the Japanese Village Plaza shop minutes later on Saturday. "I was shocked, shocked , when I saw that sign out there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1993 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The lovingly restored former Buddhist temple that houses the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo is among downtown's quirkiest and most charming corners, but it's about as authentically Japanese as the Egyptian Theatre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the Japanese-American community on the verge of ethnic extinction? Are Japanese-Americans marrying non-Japanese so rapidly that they are disappearing into the fabled melting pot? This is one of the knotty questions being addressed this week as hundreds of Japanese-Americans from around the country gather in Los Angeles to mark the 50th anniversary of the World World II internment.
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