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Japanese Americans Hawaii

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NEWS
December 4, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reasons are as compelling as the paycheck drawn on a Tokyo bank, as obvious as the miso soup breakfast special at the hotel coffee shop, as dramatic as the U.S. senator with the name Inouye: Commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor is a complicated affair for Hawaii. Here, 50 years later, in what became the 50th state, oil from the great fight still seeps from the sunken battleship Arizona. Yet bonds with Japan are stronger and more vital here than anywhere else in America.
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NEWS
December 4, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The reasons are as compelling as the paycheck drawn on a Tokyo bank, as obvious as the miso soup breakfast special at the hotel coffee shop, as dramatic as the U.S. senator with the name Inouye: Commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor is a complicated affair for Hawaii. Here, 50 years later, in what became the 50th state, oil from the great fight still seeps from the sunken battleship Arizona. Yet bonds with Japan are stronger and more vital here than anywhere else in America.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001
Though letter writer Ken Hirsch (Saturday Letters, June 2) is offended by the term "concentration camp" when applied to this country's World War II internment of its Japanese American citizens, Webster's nonetheless defines such a facility as "a camp where persons (as prisoners of war, political prisoners or refugees) are detained or confined." To be sure, Hitler turned them into death camps as well; we did not. However, a day trip to Manzanar--with the remains of its barbed-wire fences and watchtowers (where Army personnel stood guard 24/7 with their rifles pointed in)
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | MARILYN OLIVER
The 46th Nisei Week Japanese Festival this Friday through Aug. 17 provides a midsummer break and an opportunity to sample the best of an exotic culture. The festival was started by Nisei, or second generation Americans of Japanese ancestry, to honor their ethnic heritage.
NEWS
May 13, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-one Asian Americans who fought in World War II for a country that doubted their loyalty will be awarded the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for valor, by President Clinton next month. The veterans, each of whom previously received the second-highest citation, the Distinguished Service Cross, were chosen for the higher award after a special four-year review of their combat service by an Army panel.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | PENELOPE MOFFET, Moffet is a local writer. and
A well-dressed Japanese-American man is being photographed on the Redondo Beach pier. As instructed, he leans against a fast-food restaurant's takeout window and stares into a camera lens. Several people at a nearby table call out joking questions. When they're ignored, one man shouts "Say cheese!" and another adds, "Say rice!" That gets a reaction. "Watch it, man," the photo subject says immediately, not looking away from the camera. The Taunting Continues "I think you hurt him!"
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Allied bombs were dropping in the snow of Dachau in April, 1945, 16-year-old Janina Cywinska was lined up against a wall and left to wait for a bullet that never came. "A Nazi was putting a blindfold on me," said Cywinska, a Polish Catholic who had survived six years in the Nazi death camps. "I thought, how ridiculous. I have seen so much killing by now, why be so considerate to put the blindfold on my face?"
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