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NEWS
January 5, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yukio Tatsumi wanders down Tuna Street, a deserted lane that dead-ends at a moldering harbor. "This used to be the Takeuchi Pool Hall," he says. "This was the Mio Restaurant." He points to an expanse of asphalt piled with steel cargo containers. "That was our school. This was the Shinto shrine. And this," he says, staring at a yard of high-voltage lines, "was my house."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2002 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
Daisy Uyeda Satoda, who spent her high school years at the Topaz internment camp in Utah, now spends her days rushing to chronicle her experience and that of her classmates before the memories slip away. "We've been losing so many members" of the Topaz High School class of 1945, Uyeda Satoda said. "That's why we want to get things into print." Sixty years have passed since the U.S. government banished 120,000 people of Japanese descent to camps.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2001 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, John Tateishi read of plans for a new Walt Disney film about the 1941 Japanese attack on U.S. forces at Pearl Harbor, to be produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. "When I saw it was a Bruckheimer production, my immediate reaction was, 'Oh my God,"' said Tateishi, who considers Bruckheimer's films more notable for their over-the-top special effects than subtlety, character analysis or sensitivity.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2001 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years ago, John Tateishi read of plans for a new Walt Disney film about the 1941 Japanese attack on U.S. forces at Pearl Harbor, to be produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. "When I saw it was a Bruckheimer production, my immediate reaction was, 'Oh my God,"' said Tateishi, who considers Bruckheimer's films more notable for their over-the-top special effects than subtlety, character analysis or sensitivity.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years ago, the dust storm was the only visitor here that was free to go where it pleased without a permit. It came howling at 70 m.p.h. or more from the Riverside Mountains, stirring clouds of dust in its path. It sprayed hot sand against the barracks, hurling filth through inch-wide cracks in the dried pine walls, and sometimes blew the roofs right off. Inside the flimsy barracks, residents covered their mouths with towels to keep from choking.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | Times staff writer David Reyes.
Audrey Yamagata-Noji, 39, of Santa Ana is an administrator at Rancho Santiago Community College and is Orange County's only Asian-American elected school board member. Many children of Japanese-Americans interned during the war were kept in the dark about the camps because their parents either internalized their emotions or wanted to forget what they considered the shame of those years. "I was fairly inquisitive and I would sit down with my father and ask him point blank, 'OK, Dad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For months James Hirabayashi traveled throughout parts of the West and Hawaii on a mission of historical proportions. A multimillion-dollar, first-of-its-kind museum was to open in a year and he was responsible for assembling the debut exhibit. But he became frustrated by his assignment of collecting the treasured possessions of first-generation Japanese-Americans, as family after family said their closets were empty.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | Times staff writer David Reyes.
Robert Gardner, 80, of Corona del Mar is a retired Orange County Superior Court judge. When Judge Robert Gardner's court clerk read the list of names, the judge stopped at the name of Clarence Nishizu. With a bang of the gavel, Gardner appointed Nishizu, an ex-farmer from Fullerton, as Orange County's first grand jury foreman of Japanese ancestry. "I wanted to strike a blow for fairness," the judge recalled. That was in 1966.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | Times staff writer David Reyes.
Sadayashi (George) Fujii, 76, of Garden Grove is a retired businessman. He was interned at Poston, Ariz. Fujii, born in Seattle, was sent by his parents to Japan at age 9 for his education, an experience that created a strong sense of Japanese nationalistic pride. That kibei (American-born but Japanese-educated) pride often clashed with Nisei (second-generation Japanese-American) beliefs. While other Japanese-Americans pushed loyalty to America, Fujii rode a cultural tightrope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA historian Yuji Ichioka has never played pro basketball, but his fans like to call him an Asian Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Watch him on the basketball court any Wednesday or Friday morning, and you'll see the lean, bespectacled scholar stripped to his gray sweat shorts, running and jumping to score baskets and block shots with the vigor of the 20-year-olds with whom he plays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a U.S. soldier in World War II, Yuke Iguchi fought more than European fascism: He also battled on behalf of all Japanese Americans to prove their loyalty to the United States. Now in his twilight years, Iguchi, as well as thousands of other veterans, wants the public to remember the pivotal role he played during the war and at home. At the urging of President Franklin D.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic roars past on Centinela Avenue, but it is quiet inside the store. Teenagers Ryan and Tammy Uyehara do homework when not waiting on the day's final customers. Their parents, June and Wayne, walk slowly toward the back, then climb steep stairs to the office. It's almost closing time at Aloha Grocery. Like the rest of the store, the office is nothing fancy. Used also for storage, it is unpretentious, worn tenderly by time and filled with memories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA historian Yuji Ichioka has never played pro basketball, but his fans like to call him an Asian Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Watch him on the basketball court any Wednesday or Friday morning, and you'll see the lean, bespectacled scholar stripped to his gray sweat shorts, running and jumping to score baskets and block shots with the vigor of the 20-year-olds with whom he plays.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
The video images run vertically, like Japanese writing. In one shot, grains of sand fall onto the face of an Asian woman, settling into the recesses. The woman doesn't resist. For artist Kim Yasuda, the image represents an act of oppression, the one perpetrated against her mother. She was a 19-year-old headed for college during World War II when she was sent to a desert internment camp for people of Japanese descent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alien hardships Made bearable by the hope I hold for my children .
NEWS
January 5, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yukio Tatsumi wanders down Tuna Street, a deserted lane that dead-ends at a moldering harbor. "This used to be the Takeuchi Pool Hall," he says. "This was the Mio Restaurant." He points to an expanse of asphalt piled with steel cargo containers. "That was our school. This was the Shinto shrine. And this," he says, staring at a yard of high-voltage lines, "was my house."
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | MARILYN MARTINEZ
The video images run vertically, like Japanese writing. In one shot, grains of sand fall onto the face of an Asian woman, settling into the recesses. The woman doesn't resist. For artist Kim Yasuda, the image represents an act of oppression, the one perpetrated against her mother. She was a 19-year-old headed for college during World War II when she was sent to a desert internment camp for people of Japanese descent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1994 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alien hardships Made bearable by the hope I hold for my children .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For months James Hirabayashi traveled throughout parts of the West and Hawaii on a mission of historical proportions. A multimillion-dollar, first-of-its-kind museum was to open in a year and he was responsible for assembling the debut exhibit. But he became frustrated by his assignment of collecting the treasured possessions of first-generation Japanese-Americans, as family after family said their closets were empty.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | Times staff writer David Reyes.
Audrey Yamagata-Noji, 39, of Santa Ana is an administrator at Rancho Santiago Community College and is Orange County's only Asian-American elected school board member. Many children of Japanese-Americans interned during the war were kept in the dark about the camps because their parents either internalized their emotions or wanted to forget what they considered the shame of those years. "I was fairly inquisitive and I would sit down with my father and ask him point blank, 'OK, Dad.
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