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BUSINESS
July 10, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
Like any good businessman, Douglas G. Nomiyama often builds rapport with clients by telling them a little about himself. Only in his case, the most innocent revelations sometimes leave everyone bewildered. "They're not used to someone being so independent, who cooks for himself, lives on his own," said Nomiyama, 26. "They don't understand why I don't live with my parents to save money." Nomiyama is a Japanese-American, Stanford-educated, raised in Seattle. And in his job as a U.S.
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SPORTS
July 15, 1993 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely two months into his rookie season in the Japanese minor leagues, second baseman Joe Furukawa learned one of the most important rules of the game. Always, always remember to bring your uniform to the ballpark. "I left my uniform at home for a three-game trip," said Furukawa, the starter for the Hiroshima Carp's minor league team. "Our equipment man was pretty mad when I told him. He told me he wanted to send me back to California." Actually, the punishment wasn't quite that harsh.
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SPORTS
July 15, 1993 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barely two months into his rookie season in the Japanese minor leagues, second baseman Joe Furukawa learned one of the most important rules of the game. Always, always remember to bring your uniform to the ballpark. "I left my uniform at home for a three-game trip," said Furukawa, the starter for the Hiroshima Carp's minor league team. "Our equipment man was pretty mad when I told him. He told me he wanted to send me back to California." Actually, the punishment wasn't quite that harsh.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1988 | JONATHAN PETERSON and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
Like any good businessman, Douglas G. Nomiyama often builds rapport with clients by telling them a little about himself. Only in his case, the most innocent revelations sometimes leave everyone bewildered. "They're not used to someone being so independent, who cooks for himself, lives on his own," said Nomiyama, 26. "They don't understand why I don't live with my parents to save money." Nomiyama is a Japanese-American, Stanford-educated, raised in Seattle. And in his job as a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Yukio "Yuki" Okutsu, a Hawaii-born Army sergeant whose Distinguished Service Cross was upgraded to a Medal of Honor three years ago for his heroism in World War II, has died. He was 81. Okutsu died Aug. 24 in Honolulu of natural causes. Nobody ever questioned Okutsu's bravery in taking out three German machine gun nests on Italy's Mt. Belvedere on April 7, 1945.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Salvador Gomez Gochez was 25 when he first came to Los Angeles with $3 in his pocket and painful memories of his Salvadoran homeland torn apart by repression and war. Working his way up from a parking lot attendant to a manager, he learned English, bought a home, volunteered for a Salvadoran community organization and became a U.S. citizen, grateful to the country he says saved his life. But Gomez Gochez, now 54, also retained his Salvadoran citizenship. Now, as a dual citizen, he has made the dramatic decision to return to his impoverished hometown in El Salvador and run for mayor after nearly three decades away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the Japanese-American community on the verge of ethnic extinction? Are Japanese-Americans marrying non-Japanese so rapidly that they are disappearing into the fabled melting pot? This is one of the knotty questions being addressed this week as hundreds of Japanese-Americans from around the country gather in Los Angeles to mark the 50th anniversary of the World World II internment.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The occasion was an intimate gathering at Tokyo's historic Imperial Hotel, where Akio Morita, then chairman of Sony Corp. and vice chairman of Keidanren, Japan's most powerful economic organization, gave his guests from California a little history lesson. Japanese companies owed their postwar success in the United States, Morita told Gov.
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