Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapanese Americans Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Japanese Americans Los Angeles

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kaz Suyeishi will never forget the quiet peace of that cloudless August morning in 1945. The 18-year-old was in the front garden of her Hiroshima home, chatting with a friend, when a gleam of silver in the sky caught her attention. "It looked like an angel," she said. "It was the most beautiful airplane. It looked like heaven and peace." The plane was the Enola Gay, dropping the world's first atomic bomb over the Japanese city. That morning, the B-29 released the weapon known as "Little Boy."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 80 years after a Los Angeles kindergarten teacher began a youth club to lure children of Japanese immigrants off the streets, her grateful students paid tribute to her at a poignant luncheon Saturday that also marked the group's disbanding. "We are so proud and thankful for what Miss Nellie Oliver did," said Ets Yoshiyama, chairman of the group, which came to be known simply as the Olivers in her honor.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1994 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking at the World War II internment camp barracks reconstructed in Little Tokyo, Ron Mukai felt a tinge of worry and pride. He was proud that he was able to help transport to Los Angeles an original barracks from a former camp in Wyoming, where his father's family was forced by the federal government to live because of concerns that Japanese Americans were a subversive threat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day for the past 100 years, babies have been born in Los Angeles. They never stopped coming--not even during the worst of times. Dr. Sakaye Shigekawa, 86, delivered nearly 20,000 of them. She remembers the ones who arrived kicking and screaming into the barbed wire confines of a detention camp. She remembers those born at downtown's Japanese Hospital, built for Japanese Americans when other hospitals would not accept them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In retrospect, it was a silent precursor to one of the darkest episodes in U.S. history. For decades, before racial prejudice and wartime hysteria resulted in the shameful internment of Japanese Americans, physicians and patients of Japanese descent were the victims of routine--and often deadly--discrimination by Los Angeles' hospitals and medical professionals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1994 | JOHN DART
Plans by the Los Angeles Buddhist Federation, a Japanese-American group of seven Downtown congregations, to join the annual inter-ethnic celebration of Buddha's birthday this year have won praise from two temple leaders in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1992 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With fierce cries and the clashing of bamboo swords, Hide Itokazu, 10, and Shiki Nakagawa, 11, fought like samurai as the Nisei Week Japanese Festival ended Sunday with a traditional kendo tournament. Practicing the "way of the sword," as the Japanese martial art of kendo is known, the two boys jabbed, pushed and shoved each other before a crowd of about 300 gathered in Little Tokyo's Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist Temple gym.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1995
To commemorate Japanese Americans who served in the Vietnam War, a veterans memorial will be constructed at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo. Similar to the monument in Washington, the Japanese American Vietnam Veterans Memorial will list on solid, black granite the names of Japanese American soldiers who died or are missing in action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixth-grader Thomas Early curiously tore open a tiny cellophane bag, pulled out the paper-weight green leaves inside and gingerly bit into them. "Ooooh, it's salty, tastes like fish," he said with a grimace. Then he took another bite out of the seaweed. "Hey, I'm getting used to it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1988
The Community Redevelopment Agency board Wednesday approved a $1-million grant to convert a former Buddhist temple in Little Tokyo into a Japanese-American museum. CRA Administrator John Tuite said the group of Japanese-Americans who want to convert the 63-year-old Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist Temple at 1st Street and Central Avenue into the Japanese American National Museum face a formidable task. "Architects must restore the building to most of its original design," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kaz Suyeishi will never forget the quiet peace of that cloudless August morning in 1945. The 18-year-old was in the front garden of her Hiroshima home, chatting with a friend, when a gleam of silver in the sky caught her attention. "It looked like an angel," she said. "It was the most beautiful airplane. It looked like heaven and peace." The plane was the Enola Gay, dropping the world's first atomic bomb over the Japanese city. That morning, the B-29 released the weapon known as "Little Boy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saturday's events would have been unfathomable for Pete Mitsui back in 1930, when he began playing baseball for the San Fernando Aces. The Aces, one of the first Japanese American baseball teams in the country, played on a dusty infield and a weedy outfield in those days. And there certainly were no major leaguers from Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In retrospect, it was a silent precursor to one of the darkest episodes in U.S. history. For decades, before racial prejudice and wartime hysteria resulted in the shameful internment of Japanese Americans, physicians and patients of Japanese descent were the victims of routine--and often deadly--discrimination by Los Angeles' hospitals and medical professionals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an American soldier fighting to help his country win the war in Okinawa, Mits Usui often longed for the day when he could go home and build the picket-fenced house of his dreams. "I remember the soldiers would sing a song about how they were going to make the San Fernando Valley their home," said Usui, referring to the Bing Crosby hit "The San Fernando Valley." "When we came back from service that song stuck in my mind. I thought to myself, 'What could be better?'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brass plaques in the 1st Street sidewalk of Little Tokyo now bear images of Japanese American life: Suitcases for trips to America and to World War II internment camps. The wooden bucket used to pickle delicacies. The fancy envelope for celebratory gifts. An apple pie. Apple pie? What's that doing in the new 1,000-foot-long art project aimed at memorializing the historic block and encouraging its revival?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
On Saturday, I drove to Boyle Heights for a garden dedication and saw an aspect of L.A. that most people don't know exists, something so different from the media stereotype that I wished everyone in town had been there. It should have led every newscast and been on every Page 1 so the event could burn into the consciousness of a city frightfully ignorant of itself. The event was the dedication of the restored Japanese garden at predominantly Latino Roosevelt High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1993
The Los Angeles-based spokesman for the Japanese American Citizens League said Monday that the group has called for a federal investigation into the shooting of a Japanese exchange student by a Louisiana man who was acquitted of the slaying. A Baton Rouge jury Sunday found Rodney Peairs not guilty of manslaughter because he fired in self-defense against Yoshihiro Hattori, who knocked on the wrong door looking for a Halloween party. The League, based in San Francisco, sent a letter to Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
The San Fernando Valley Japanese American Community Center plans to expand its facilities by two-thirds this summer, thanks to the donation of a building by Lockheed Corp. Lockheed, which has moved many of its operations out of its longtime Burbank plant, has offered the 7,700-square-foot building to the center. For its part, the community center will pay to have the building cut into four parts and moved to its facility in Pacoima.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Linda Morimoto dedicated her life to two causes: delivering babies--perhaps 2,000 during a 40-year career--and fighting crime. So a mourning Japanese American community has had an especially difficult time coming to grips with the circumstances of her death. Morimoto, 75, was found bludgeoned Friday in her ransacked Westlake-area home. "Everybody knows how much she fought against things like this happening," said Frances Hashimoto, president of the Little Tokyo Business Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Linda Morimoto dedicated her life to two causes: delivering babies--perhaps 2,000 during a 40-year career--and fighting crime. So a mourning Japanese American community has had an especially difficult time coming to grips with the circumstances of her death. Morimoto, 75, was found bludgeoned Friday in her ransacked Westlake-area home. "Everybody knows how much she fought against things like this happening," said Frances Hashimoto, president of the Little Tokyo Business Assn.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|