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NEWS
October 23, 1988 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Tom and Wendy Teng, who emigrated from Hong Kong and South Vietnam, live in a modest, rented Rosemead home with sons Steve, 12, and Richard, 2. Teng drives a tour bus for Asian visitors; his wife is a job counselor at the Chinatown Service Center. Their joint income obviously isn't overwhelming. Still, when it was time three years ago to decide whether to expand their household and bring from her native land Khank Tran, Wendy Teng's 67-year-old widowed mother, there was little discussion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, St. Thomas Lutheran Church has been a living monument to the kindness of strangers in another time, another place. Built to honor the deeds of three white people in Minnesota who befriended young Japanese Americans during World War II, it attracted a vibrant, multicultural congregation to its sanctuary in Gardena. Now the church itself is slipping into history.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To an upscale Japanese-American family in Claremont, the harassment involved broken eggs, human feces slung on a front porch and a vulgar missive painted on an outside wall. "You Rice Ball," the overnight vandal wrote. To a program director at a well-known Asian-American center in Los Angeles, the hate mail is a regularly arriving nuisance: large envelopes containing slogans such as "Japs Go Home" and crude hand-drawn cartoons of people with yellow faces and devil's horns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through no fault of his own, Jim Sugasawara had to wait more than half a century to get his diploma from Compton High School. Thursday evening, the retired Japanese American auto mechanic from Altadena finally got the diploma that he didn't get 53 years ago because the United States, the country of his birth, was at war with Japan, the country of his ancestors. "I'll probably sleep with it, " said Sugasawara, who will be 72 in August.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Japanese-Americans were paying little notice Thursday as Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu sat down for trade and fence-mending talks with President Bush. "There wasn't even a buzz around here," said Moritaka Uchimura, manager of the Little Tokyo Towers senior citizens' home in the old Japanese center of Los Angeles. Though 90% of the elderly residents still speak Japanese, Uchimura said, "Nobody seems to be interested in it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1991
So our senators voted themselves a pay raise to make their salary equal to that of our representatives (Part A, July 18). They tacked on an amendment to end receiving honorariums. This is a good start, but until they cut their biggest windfall, money from political action committees, they will still be beholden to the special interest groups. Ask any evangelist; there is more than one way to fleece a flock. Our legislators have a million of them. DENNIS E. HAMRICK Fullerton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through no fault of his own, Jim Sugasawara had to wait more than half a century to get his diploma from Compton High School. Thursday evening, the retired Japanese American auto mechanic from Altadena finally got the diploma that he didn't get 53 years ago because the United States, the country of his birth, was at war with Japan, the country of his ancestors. "I'll probably sleep with it, " said Sugasawara, who will be 72 in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson H. Yamamoto, a rookie Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy who had been on patrol less than two months, died Tuesday of wounds suffered last weekend in a shootout with murder suspects in Walnut Park. He was 26. The shooting marks the first time a Los Angeles County deputy has been killed in hostile action since 1989, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1998 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, St. Thomas Lutheran Church has been a living monument to the kindness of strangers in another time, another place. Built to honor the deeds of three white people in Minnesota who befriended young Japanese Americans during World War II, it attracted a vibrant, multicultural congregation to its sanctuary in Gardena. Now the church itself is slipping into history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Nearly a half-century has passed, but baseball legend Duke Snider recalls the smiling face of schoolmate Mas Fukai at their 1941 junior high school baseball games. Once in a while, Snider added, Mas--who always took his glove to the games--even filled in at right field. The Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor changed all that, Snider recalled. "(Fukai) was always a lot of fun to have around," said Snider, formerly of the Dodgers and now a Montreal Expos announcer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson H. Yamamoto, a rookie Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy who had been on patrol less than two months, died Tuesday of wounds suffered last weekend in a shootout with murder suspects in Walnut Park. He was 26. The shooting marks the first time a Los Angeles County deputy has been killed in hostile action since 1989, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To an upscale Japanese-American family in Claremont, the harassment involved broken eggs, human feces slung on a front porch and a vulgar missive painted on an outside wall. "You Rice Ball," the overnight vandal wrote. To a program director at a well-known Asian-American center in Los Angeles, the hate mail is a regularly arriving nuisance: large envelopes containing slogans such as "Japs Go Home" and crude hand-drawn cartoons of people with yellow faces and devil's horns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1991
So our senators voted themselves a pay raise to make their salary equal to that of our representatives (Part A, July 18). They tacked on an amendment to end receiving honorariums. This is a good start, but until they cut their biggest windfall, money from political action committees, they will still be beholden to the special interest groups. Ask any evangelist; there is more than one way to fleece a flock. Our legislators have a million of them. DENNIS E. HAMRICK Fullerton
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Japanese-Americans were paying little notice Thursday as Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu sat down for trade and fence-mending talks with President Bush. "There wasn't even a buzz around here," said Moritaka Uchimura, manager of the Little Tokyo Towers senior citizens' home in the old Japanese center of Los Angeles. Though 90% of the elderly residents still speak Japanese, Uchimura said, "Nobody seems to be interested in it."
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | DAVID LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Tom and Wendy Teng, who emigrated from Hong Kong and South Vietnam, live in a modest, rented Rosemead home with sons Steve, 12, and Richard, 2. Teng drives a tour bus for Asian visitors; his wife is a job counselor at the Chinatown Service Center. Their joint income obviously isn't overwhelming. Still, when it was time three years ago to decide whether to expand their household and bring from her native land Khank Tran, Wendy Teng's 67-year-old widowed mother, there was little discussion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Nearly a half-century has passed, but baseball legend Duke Snider recalls the smiling face of schoolmate Mas Fukai at their 1941 junior high school baseball games. Once in a while, Snider added, Mas--who always took his glove to the games--even filled in at right field. The Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor changed all that, Snider recalled. "(Fukai) was always a lot of fun to have around," said Snider, formerly of the Dodgers and now a Montreal Expos announcer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1990 | BILL BOYARSKY
Next month, the Legislature begins the messy process of drawing new boundaries for congressional and legislative districts. I've always found redistricting, which occurs after every Census, to be one of politics' most fascinating back room dramas, although it's a tough sell to readers. Friends destroy each other for the sake of a favorable district. Old scores are settled.
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