Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapanese Americans Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Japanese Americans Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1995 | JEANETTE DeSANTIS and STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A mother and father in Van Nuys on Tuesday mourned the death of their child half a world away. Meanwhile, in Little Tokyo, traditional heart of Los Angeles' Japanese community, anxious shopkeepers and visitors studied Japanese newspapers filled with graphic accounts of destruction. As western Japan struggled in the wake of its calamitous quake, so too did Los Angeles--home to one of the largest concentrations of people of Japanese ancestry outside Japan.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1989 | JONATHAN GAW, Times Staff Writer
Kiku Uno was one of about 500 people wearing black arm bands at a demonstration in Little Tokyo on Saturday to protest delays in redress for Japanese-Americans who were interned in U.S. relocation camps during World War II. Occasionally yelling "Justice now!" during a 20-minute march, the 64-year-old Uno is not hopeful that she will see reparations from the U.S. government in her lifetime. "I had a brother who volunteered for the 442nd (a U.S. Army regiment) during the war . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1991 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A winning design was announced Monday for a monument to Japanese-American veterans, but the decision did not end a long-simmering controversy over whether the monument should pay homage to the living as well as the dead. At a press conference announcing the design, rival groups agreed that the monument should list the names of Japanese-Americans killed or missing in action in all U.S. wars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1989 | HECTOR TOBAR, Times Staff Writer
Shigeru Shimizu, 98, approached the table slowly and with great difficulty. Standing before the emperor's portrait, she placed her hands together and prayed, whispering a few words in Japanese until she could no longer contain her emotions and began to tremble and cry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is not wealthy. Still, Akira Suzuki figures he is a rich man. That accounts for what the former World War II Japanese-American detention camp resident did the other day when his government reparation check showed up in the mail. Suzuki turned the $20,000 check over to a community center near downtown Los Angeles that serves a mixed neighborhood of African-Americans, Latinos and Asian-Americans.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | MIKE KRENSAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When customers who bought Japanese pastries from the Kito family store in the 1940s return to Little Tokyo in downtown Los Angeles, they frequently are astonished to find Brian Kito baking the same confections that his father created 40 years earlier from the same tiny shop on First Street. "People who haven't been down here for a while . . . are surprised we're still here," said Kito, 33, continuing a business his grandfather started in 1903.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Linda Morimoto dedicated her life to two causes: delivering babies--perhaps 2,000 during a 40-year career--and fighting crime. So a mourning Japanese American community has had an especially difficult time coming to grips with the circumstances of her death. Morimoto, 75, was found bludgeoned Friday in her ransacked Westlake-area home. "Everybody knows how much she fought against things like this happening," said Frances Hashimoto, president of the Little Tokyo Business Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every day for the past 100 years, babies have been born in Los Angeles. They never stopped coming--not even during the worst of times. Dr. Sakaye Shigekawa, 86, delivered nearly 20,000 of them. She remembers the ones who arrived kicking and screaming into the barbed wire confines of a detention camp. She remembers those born at downtown's Japanese Hospital, built for Japanese Americans when other hospitals would not accept them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brass plaques in the 1st Street sidewalk of Little Tokyo now bear images of Japanese American life: Suitcases for trips to America and to World War II internment camps. The wooden bucket used to pickle delicacies. The fancy envelope for celebratory gifts. An apple pie. Apple pie? What's that doing in the new 1,000-foot-long art project aimed at memorializing the historic block and encouraging its revival?
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS
At a fashion show to help launch Nisei Week, the annual celebration of the Japanese community in Los Angeles, Shirley Sakamoto attracted special attention. She is a third-generation Japanese-American who makes custom-designed clothes for private customers. And she was chosen as the only Asian designer to participate in this year's show. Other fashion entrees were selected from popular shops in the Montebello, Santa Ana, San Marino and Whittier areas.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|