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Japanese Americans Orange County

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NEWS
February 16, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years ago, the dust storm was the only visitor here that was free to go where it pleased without a permit. It came howling at 70 m.p.h. or more from the Riverside Mountains, stirring clouds of dust in its path. It sprayed hot sand against the barracks, hurling filth through inch-wide cracks in the dried pine walls, and sometimes blew the roofs right off. Inside the flimsy barracks, residents covered their mouths with towels to keep from choking.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Tsuyoshi Hirosumi had been the first-born son in his family, he would be in Hiroshima, at the Buddhist temple his ancestors began about 700 years ago. "In Japan, especially for our denomination, the elder son assumes the father's position when it is time," said Hirosumi, the 61-year-old spiritual leader of the Newport Higashi Honganji Temple. "I was born the third son of the temple, so I could go anywhere."
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NEWS
November 11, 1991 | JOHN NEEDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hiroshi Kamei was 14 years old on Dec. 7, 1941, the son of farmers living in Westminster, a freshman at Huntington Beach High School. Your all-American kid, all in all, except for his parents. They were Japanese. Kamei, now an Anaheim Hills resident and three times president of the Japanese American Citizens League's chapter that covers North Orange County and southern Los Angeles County, says he didn't think that much about the news of the Japanese attack at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kathy Oshima George is the principal of an elementary school where Japanese is taught to every student from kindergarten through sixth grade. But when students see George on campus at Concordia Elementary, they greet her in English, the only language she speaks. The third-generation Japanese American is scrambling now to learn a bit of her ancestors' language before leaving for Tokyo next month for a three-week program sponsored by the Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1991 | JON NALICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As is their tradition on Memorial Day, the brother and sister of Army Staff Sgt. Kazuo Masuda will attend a graveside ceremony in Westminster to honor Japanese-Americans from Orange County who died fighting for the United States in World War II. In 1944, Masuda earned the Distinguished Service Cross after volunteering for a dangerous night patrol that cost him his life. His family learned of his heroism while they were imprisoned by the U.S. government in an internment camp in Arizona.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
On this chilly, overcast day, Robert Ida is once again making his morning rounds of a small, aged school building, deep in a bleakly obscure neighborhood of Garden Grove. Ida surveys the grounds carefully--a solitary figure in baggy jeans, old work shirt and scruffy zoris--making sure each window, doorway and classroom is secure. As usual, he says, he finds no signs of tampering or vandalism. Such loving attention might seem wasted on such a worn and homely building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1995 | DAVID REYES and CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wrought with worry and fear, Orange County residents of Japanese ancestry saw the news photos Tuesday showing the chilling earthquake destruction of Kobe, Japan, where the dead, injured and missing numbered in the thousands. Scores of Japanese Americans, many with relatives or friends in the danger area, tried to go about their business as usual, strolling into favorite restaurants and markets. But more than usual, they were talking fervently and sharing information--any information.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Row upon row of black, tar-paper barracks here have been replaced by uniform fields of alfalfa. This remote Indian reservation offers no hint today that the internment camp here during World War II was a watershed experience for Japanese-Americans. No monument stands at the Poston Relocation Center, just a small engraving on a decaying, graffiti-covered gymnasium that says it was "built by the Japanese residents of Poston, 1943."
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Orange County sheriff's deputies knocked on the front door, the sun had already set behind the farmhouse of Gensuke and Tamae Masuda. It was the night of Dec. 7, 1941, and the hopes and dreams of the Masuda family were about to come to an abrupt halt. June Masuda Goto was 19 then and remembers holding open the screen door for the deputies. "The deputies hardly talked to us," Goto, 69, of Fountain Valley said. "They said they came for Gensuke Masuda. My mother cried."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Buddhist temple here has sat quietly on an out-of-the-way corner of town for four years, as subtle and solemn as a statue of Buddha himself. * But that is about to change. The small Shin Buddhist congregation, which recently broke off from its parent temple in Los Angeles, needs to raise money and draw in more people. To do so, it is trying a strategy long used as a revenue source by Christian churches but almost unheard of in Buddhism: monthly bingo games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Buddhist temple here has sat quietly on an out-of-the-way corner of town for four years, as subtle and solemn as a statue of Buddha himself. * But that is about to change. The small Shin Buddhist congregation, which recently broke off from its parent temple in Los Angeles, needs to raise money and draw in more people. To do so, it is trying a strategy long used as a revenue source by Christian churches but almost unheard of in Buddhism: monthly bingo games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1995 | DAVID REYES and CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Wrought with worry and fear, Orange County residents of Japanese ancestry saw the news photos Tuesday showing the chilling earthquake destruction of Kobe, Japan, where the dead, injured and missing numbered in the thousands. Scores of Japanese Americans, many with relatives or friends in the danger area, tried to go about their business as usual, strolling into favorite restaurants and markets. But more than usual, they were talking fervently and sharing information--any information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994 | TAMMY HYUNJOO KRESTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Janet Matsuyama has been in school for 65 years. She vowed she would never leave while in the first grade when, after school, her kid brother and friends acted as pupils while she lectured on the finer points of math and English as their teacher. Since then, the pretend-classroom has been traded in for a succession of real ones, and along the way, the Fullerton College professor of accounting has become a pioneer in education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amy Uchimoto Naito finished first in her high school class, but it took 52 years for her to actually walk the stage in cap and gown and collect her honors as valedictorian. Less than a month before Naito's scheduled graduation from Armijo High School in Fairfield, Calif., in 1942, she and her family were sent to an internment camp, as were more than 100,000 people of Japanese ancestry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | GREG HERNANDEZ
For more than six years, Orange County Deputy Dist. Atty. Jim Tanizaki has successfully prosecuted cases involving arson, police and government misconduct and a variety of other crimes. "In this job, you see that there is a lot of pain being inflicted by criminals out in the community," Tanizaki said. "There is so much suffering through these crimes, and they have such an effect on people's lives."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | LEN HALL
Growing up in Ogden, Utah, Irene L. Kinoshita knew about being different. "It was more being non-Mormon than Asian," Kinoshita said. "In public school, the teachers would ask, 'How many of you are Mormon?' Almost everyone else would raise their hand. It happened more than once." It was only later, after starting college at San Francisco State, that she began to understand the world's ethnic diversity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
A Japanese-American woman said Thursday that she was shocked by an incident in June at the Huntington Beach Red Onion, where she and two female friends allegedly were verbally and physically assaulted by a group of white women in the bar and told to speak English. The woman, who asked not to be named, said she suffered a split lip after a group of five or six white women pushed, kicked and hit her and the other two women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 10 years ago a penniless Jim Sakurai became pastor of the Orange County Holiness Church and decided to help the struggling congregation establish itself in Cypress. It was one of the few Japanese-American Christian churches in the county and lacked a regular place of worship or many congregants. To create a following, the former engineer-turned-minister began knocking on doors looking for converts.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
James Kanno, 66, of Santa Ana is a real estate broker. He was interned at a camp in Poston, Ariz. When Kanno was elected the first mayor of Fountain Valley in 1957, Voice of America trumpeted his victory. It was the first time a Japanese-American had held the office of mayor in the country and was an example of democracy in action. Just 12 years earlier, Kanno and his family had been interned at a camp in Poston, Ariz.
NEWS
February 17, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Charles Ishii, 75, of Santa Ana, is a retired farmer. He served as a first sergeant with the famed 442 Regimental Combat Team during World War II. Ishii was drafted by the Army in March, 1941. But after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the FBI arrested his father, Kyutaro Ishii, on the family farm in Talbert (now Fountain Valley). The family was sent to the internment camp in Poston, Ariz., but Ishii was assigned to a unit of an all-Japanese American regiment, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team.
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