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Japanese Americans Southern California

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY Robert Smaus..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disney's movie "Dick Tracy" is big at the box office, but some local Asian and Latino groups are unhappy with Disney-owned KCAL Channel 9 for reviving a 29-year-old "Dick Tracy" cartoon series that they say contains ethnic and racial stereotypes. "When you exaggerate racial and ethnic mannerisms and characteristics, that is racism, no matter how you slice it," said Raul Ruiz, Chicano studies professor at Cal State Northridge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You say "toe-MAY-toe," I say "toe-MAH-toe." And they say "NAHG-a-no," we say "nah-GAH-no." That's the mournful tune being sung in Nagano-surnamed households across Los Angeles this week as the Winter Olympics from Nagano, Japan, are beamed into living rooms all over town. Japanese Americans whose last name is Nagano say that television commentators from the Olympic site are mispronouncing their name.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You say "toe-MAY-toe," I say "toe-MAH-toe." And they say "NAHG-a-no," we say "nah-GAH-no." That's the mournful tune being sung in Nagano-surnamed households across Los Angeles this week as the Winter Olympics from Nagano, Japan, are beamed into living rooms all over town. Japanese Americans whose last name is Nagano say that television commentators from the Olympic site are mispronouncing their name.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY Robert Smaus..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disney's movie "Dick Tracy" is big at the box office, but some local Asian and Latino groups are unhappy with Disney-owned KCAL Channel 9 for reviving a 29-year-old "Dick Tracy" cartoon series that they say contains ethnic and racial stereotypes. "When you exaggerate racial and ethnic mannerisms and characteristics, that is racism, no matter how you slice it," said Raul Ruiz, Chicano studies professor at Cal State Northridge.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen-year-old Mitsuko Yasukochi Funakoshi was just two months shy of graduation in the spring of 1942, full of hope and ambition, when her world was torn in two. With anti-Japanese hysteria fanned by the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government ordered all people of Japanese ancestry to leave the West Coast. Funakoshi, a community college student, was forced to abandon her textbooks and flee California with her family, prosperous Norwalk grocers who could take only what they could carry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
Japanese and Japanese American students at Mission College in Sylmar have started a relief fund for victims of the Kobe earthquake. The money collected will be sent to the Japanese Americans of Southern California's relief fund, said Laurence Estaville, foreign student program director. Estaville said the donations will be presented to the organization Feb. 14. "It's an American custom to profess love on Valentine's Day," Estaville said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1996
During World War II, the Roosevelt administration ordered the abduction and detention of more than 2,200 people of Japanese ancestry from 13 Latin American countries, mostly from Peru. There appeared to be no compelling reason for the sweep, save for the dubious possibility that they constituted a military threat. Peru had no role in the conflict. After the war, many of the abductees were refused reentry to the Latin countries. Some eventually returned to Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japanese American group that has spent seven frustrating years trying to develop a community gym on city-owned land in Little Tokyo may finally get a chance at today's City Council meeting. The council will consider a proposal to discuss the multipurpose gym with the Little Tokyo Service Center. It would sit on land now used for city employee parking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He told us what our little pueblo was like when the 13 colonies of the Atlantic coast created the United States of America. He told us what developed over the seven decades before and the century and a half after that village joined the new nation. But most important, he told us long before the word "multiethnic" came to be intertwined with "Los Angeles" that the pueblo-cum-megalopolis had been multiethnic from its very first encampment in 1781. William M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2010 | By Teresa Watanabe
Mickey Komai opens one of the leather-bound books stored in his Little Tokyo office and delicately turns the yellowed pages filled with Japanese and English script. Here in the pages of the bilingual newspaper his family has run for most of a century is the tumultuous story of Japanese Americans in Southern California. The Rafu Shimpo covered acts to ban Japanese from owning land, bringing over brides and eventually immigrating at all. "Why do people hate the Japanese?" the paper plaintively asked in one 1926 issue.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen-year-old Mitsuko Yasukochi Funakoshi was just two months shy of graduation in the spring of 1942, full of hope and ambition, when her world was torn in two. With anti-Japanese hysteria fanned by the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government ordered all people of Japanese ancestry to leave the West Coast. Funakoshi, a community college student, was forced to abandon her textbooks and flee California with her family, prosperous Norwalk grocers who could take only what they could carry.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
An independent Chinese-American programming company working for KAZN-AM had lobbied hard to get a Los Angeles nightclub to advertise on the radio station's Chinese show. So the firm was stunned recently when a rival KAZN programmer persuaded the club to buy time on KAZN's Korean segment instead. "They were ready to sign up with us . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yielding to pressure from supporters of a proposed community gymnasium in Little Tokyo, the decision-making body for the Central Avenue Art Park project has broadened its membership to better reflect the community, including neighborhood residents. Under the revised scheme, Little Tokyo residents, businesses, and property owners each get a vote on the executive committee, which has been expanded from nine to 19 members.
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