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NEWS
October 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Frank Yatsu never thought he would live to see his government apologize for imprisoning him during World War II. But a check carrying that message should arrive in a few days--just before he turns 107. "That's pretty good, I think," Yatsu said. "The American government treated us in a Christian way, and it's pretty good." The government soon will start sending $20,000 checks to each of the surviving Japanese-Americans sent to internment camps during the war.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999
After five generations in the United States, Japanese Americans are no longer the country's largest Asian group, having dropped to third, behind Chinese and Filipinos, in the 1990 census. Still, among people of Asian ancestry, Japanese Americans enjoy the highest representation in politics, government and the upper echelons of academia and the corporate world.
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NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate completed congressional action on legislation appropriating $17.2 billion for the State, Justice and Commerce departments and guaranteeing reparations payments to Japanese-Americans interned in World War II. The legislation, which was approved on a voice vote, was sent to the White House, where President Bush's signature is expected. The appropriations bill redeems a commitment made in earlier legislation that authorized reparations payments for internment but provided no money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the Japanese-American community on the verge of ethnic extinction? Are Japanese-Americans marrying non-Japanese so rapidly that they are disappearing into the fabled melting pot? This is one of the knotty questions being addressed this week as hundreds of Japanese-Americans from around the country gather in Los Angeles to mark the 50th anniversary of the World World II internment.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
Japanese-American activists and civil liberties officials Wednesday urged Congress to provide maximum funding for the program to compensate some 60,000 U.S. citizens who were interned in camps during World War II. The Japanese-American internees, many of whom were uprooted by the government from homes in California and taken to wilderness camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor, are entitled to $20,000 each under a law passed last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999
After five generations in the United States, Japanese Americans are no longer the country's largest Asian group, having dropped to third, behind Chinese and Filipinos, in the 1990 census. Still, among people of Asian ancestry, Japanese Americans enjoy the highest representation in politics, government and the upper echelons of academia and the corporate world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the chips were down, most of Assemblyman Gil Ferguson's Republican colleagues from Orange County disappeared or refused to vote on his highly publicized resolution justifying the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. And Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) said Wednesday he felt particularly abandoned when fellow conservatives failed to even grant him a simple parliamentary courtesy that would have allowed him to rebut a litany of critics during the highly unusual debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reopening a debate that earned him widespread scorn among his legislative colleagues last year, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) has introduced a resolution that states "it is simply untrue that Japanese-Americans were interned in concentration camps during World War II."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the Japanese-American community on the verge of ethnic extinction? Are Japanese-Americans marrying non-Japanese so rapidly that they are disappearing into the fabled melting pot? This is one of the knotty questions being addressed this week as hundreds of Japanese-Americans from around the country gather in Los Angeles to mark the 50th anniversary of the World World II internment.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Frank Yatsu never thought he would live to see his government apologize for imprisoning him during World War II. But a check carrying that message should arrive in a few days--just before he turns 107. "That's pretty good, I think," Yatsu said. "The American government treated us in a Christian way, and it's pretty good." The government soon will start sending $20,000 checks to each of the surviving Japanese-Americans sent to internment camps during the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the chips were down, most of Assemblyman Gil Ferguson's Republican colleagues from Orange County disappeared or refused to vote on his highly publicized resolution justifying the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. And Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) said Wednesday he felt particularly abandoned when fellow conservatives failed to even grant him a simple parliamentary courtesy that would have allowed him to rebut a litany of critics during the highly unusual debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reopening a debate that earned him widespread scorn among his legislative colleagues last year, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) has introduced a resolution that states "it is simply untrue that Japanese-Americans were interned in concentration camps during World War II."
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Senate completed congressional action on legislation appropriating $17.2 billion for the State, Justice and Commerce departments and guaranteeing reparations payments to Japanese-Americans interned in World War II. The legislation, which was approved on a voice vote, was sent to the White House, where President Bush's signature is expected. The appropriations bill redeems a commitment made in earlier legislation that authorized reparations payments for internment but provided no money.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
Japanese-American activists and civil liberties officials Wednesday urged Congress to provide maximum funding for the program to compensate some 60,000 U.S. citizens who were interned in camps during World War II. The Japanese-American internees, many of whom were uprooted by the government from homes in California and taken to wilderness camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor, are entitled to $20,000 each under a law passed last year.
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