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Japanese Americans Women

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1991 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Human Relations Commission is investigating allegations that three Japanese-American women were harassed and assaulted at a Red Onion restaurant here. The three women were at the restaurant at 16450 Pacific Coast Highway when they were "assaulted verbally by some Anglo women and men who were coming after them because they were speaking Japanese," said Rusty Kennedy, the commission's director.
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NEWS
April 14, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the first Japanese American women came to the United States as "picture brides," kimonoed women brave enough or desperate enough to spend a month at sea traveling to marry men whose faces they knew only from photographs. Their daughters--the generation known in Japanese as nisei--thought of themselves as citizens like any other.
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NEWS
March 18, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the first Japanese American women came to the United States as "picture brides," kimonoed women brave enough or desperate enough to spend a month at sea to marry a man whose face they knew only from a photograph. Their daughters--the generation known in Japanese as Nisei--thought of themselves as citizens like any other.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the first Japanese American women came to the United States as "picture brides," kimonoed women brave enough or desperate enough to spend a month at sea to marry a man whose face they knew only from a photograph. Their daughters--the generation known in Japanese as Nisei--thought of themselves as citizens like any other.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the first Japanese American women came to the United States as "picture brides," kimonoed women brave enough or desperate enough to spend a month at sea to marry a man whose face they knew only from a photograph. Their daughters--the generation known in Japanese as Nisei--thought of themselves as citizens like any other.
NEWS
April 14, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the first Japanese American women came to the United States as "picture brides," kimonoed women brave enough or desperate enough to spend a month at sea traveling to marry men whose faces they knew only from photographs. Their daughters--the generation known in Japanese as nisei--thought of themselves as citizens like any other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1987
This is in response to the paid political ad that appeared in your Westside section, Sept. 27, by Assemblyman Gil Ferguson, an Orange County Republican, and Mickey Conroy, perennial president of the Armed Forces Retirees Assn. of California (AFRAC) and the California Veterans for Justice. As a former Orange County resident and former member of AFRAC who recently moved to Los Angeles, I am very familiar with the activities and tactics of both these "gentlemen." Ferguson has the dubious distinction of often putting his foot in his mouth when discussing minorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | From Religion News Service
Since it was established here 97 years ago, the Buddhist Churches of America has provided cultural shelter--and a religious foundation--to four generations of Japanese Americans. At the group's religious center has been Japan's Jodo Shinshu Buddhism--an Americanized version of Zen Buddhism.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California voters appear poised to reshape the state Assembly in November by filling at least one-third of the seats with new faces, including more minorities and women, and possibly handing Republicans control of the Legislature's lower house for the first time since 1970.
NEWS
March 18, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the first Japanese American women came to the United States as "picture brides," kimonoed women brave enough or desperate enough to spend a month at sea to marry a man whose face they knew only from a photograph. Their daughters--the generation known in Japanese as Nisei--thought of themselves as citizens like any other.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1991 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Human Relations Commission is investigating allegations that three Japanese-American women were harassed and assaulted at a Red Onion restaurant here. The three women were at the restaurant at 16450 Pacific Coast Highway when they were "assaulted verbally by some Anglo women and men who were coming after them because they were speaking Japanese," said Rusty Kennedy, the commission's director.
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