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OPINION
January 18, 2013 | By Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman
This month 75 years ago, the people of Nanking, China's ancient capital city, were in the midst of one of the worst atrocities in history, the infamous Rape of Nanking. The truth of what actually happened is at the center of a bitter dispute between China and Japan that continues to play out in present-day relations. Many Chinese see Japan's election last month of ultraconservative nationalist Shinzo Abe as prime minister as just the latest in a string of insults. And it was recently reported that Japan is considering rolling back its 1993 apology regarding "comfort women," the thousands of women the Japanese army sexually enslaved during World War II. In 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army, captured Nanking on Dec. 13. No one knows the exact toll the Japanese soldiers exacted on its citizens, but a postwar Allied investigation put the numbers at more than 200,000 killed and at least 20,000 women and girls raped in the six weeks after the city fell.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By Brittany Levine
Three members of Japan's House of Representatives called on Glendale to remove an 1,100-pound statue honoring an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 "comfort women" from Korea, China and other countries who were forced into prostitution by the Japanese army during World War II. The trio, Mio Sugita of the Hyogo Prefecture, Yuzuru Nishida of Chiba, and Hiromu Nakamaru of Hiroshima, are members of the Japan Restoration Party, a 1-year-old conservative political...
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NEWS
June 2, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Korean women began their court battle in Tokyo to obtain compensation for wartime sex slavery for the Japanese army. An attorney for the Japanese government reiterated its position rejecting compensation demands. Last year, 44 South Koreans, including nine former "comfort women," filed suit demanding $156,000 each in compensation from Japan. Other plaintiffs included Korean men drafted into the Japanese army while Japan ran Korea as a colony from 1910-45.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Brittany Levine
A councilman from Glendale's sister city in Japan tried to persuade city officials last week to remove a statue honoring women forced into prostitution during World War II by the Japanese Army. His plea Friday came during the first face-to-face meeting between officials from both cities since Glendale installed the statue in July. Some officials from the city of Higashiosaka are considering dissolving the 50-year sister-city relationship. Proponents say the statue honors an estimated 200,000 women from Korea, China, Vietnam and other countries who were taken as sex slaves by the Japanese military.
NEWS
November 25, 1986
A newspaper in Japan reported that Japanese troops in World War II massacred hundreds of Indonesian villagers on the island of Barbar and that the Japanese army subsequently covered up the atrocity. The authoritative Asahi Evening News said an unidentified former company commander, the "central figure in the massacre," admitted in an interview "that his unit had committed the massacre."
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
After tracking Nazi war criminals for 17 years, the Justice Department took its first action against Japanese army veterans suspected of medically experimenting on prisoners and operating forced sex camps during World War II. Sixteen men who served in the Imperial Army were barred from ever entering the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013
When Glendale officials proposed a memorial to "comfort women" - sex slaves who served the Japanese army in occupied countries during World War II - they saw it as a quiet gesture of goodwill for the city's Korean community. But city leaders soon realized that they had stepped into a major international controversy. Join us at 9 a.m. as we discuss Glendale's memorial and the backlash city officials have received with Times reporter Jack Dolan. Glendale officials have been bombarded with hundreds of angry emails, mostly from Japan, accusing them of falling for "anti-Japan propaganda" and calling the Korean women, many of whom say they were abducted from their homes as teenagers, "liars" and willing "prostitutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Jack Dolan and Jung-yoon Choi
When Glendale officials proposed a memorial to "comfort women" - sex slaves who served the Japanese army in occupied countries during World War II - they saw it as a quiet gesture of goodwill for the city's Korean community. The planned statue shows a young girl seated next to an empty chair: a symbolic memorial to the estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women, mostly from Korea, who spent the war in Japanese military brothels serving up to 50 men per day. But city leaders soon realized that they had stepped into a major international controversy.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | Associated Press
Hundreds of demonstrators marched through Seoul on Tuesday to protest a visit to South Korea by Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa. Riot police halted the protesters--most of them relatives of Koreans killed or forced to serve as prostitutes for Japanese soldiers during World War II--a few hundred yards from the National Assembly building. "Japan must make an official and immediate apology for what (it) did to us in the past," the protesters chanted.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Dennis Lim
World War II and its aftermath loom large in the endlessly rich expanse of 20th century Japanese cinema. But no major Japanese director was as visibly affected by this defining trauma as Masaki Kobayashi (1916-96). An art history student, Kobayashi decided to take up filmmaking when the Pacific war broke out, convinced that cinema was a more urgent medium for a time of crisis. Mere months after securing an apprenticeship at the Shochiku studio, he was conscripted into the Japanese Army in Manchuria, where, as an act of resistance, he refused to rise above the rank of private.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2013
When Glendale officials proposed a memorial to "comfort women" - sex slaves who served the Japanese army in occupied countries during World War II - they saw it as a quiet gesture of goodwill for the city's Korean community. But city leaders soon realized that they had stepped into a major international controversy. Join us at 9 a.m. as we discuss Glendale's memorial and the backlash city officials have received with Times reporter Jack Dolan. Glendale officials have been bombarded with hundreds of angry emails, mostly from Japan, accusing them of falling for "anti-Japan propaganda" and calling the Korean women, many of whom say they were abducted from their homes as teenagers, "liars" and willing "prostitutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Jack Dolan and Jung-yoon Choi
When Glendale officials proposed a memorial to "comfort women" - sex slaves who served the Japanese army in occupied countries during World War II - they saw it as a quiet gesture of goodwill for the city's Korean community. The planned statue shows a young girl seated next to an empty chair: a symbolic memorial to the estimated 80,000 to 200,000 women, mostly from Korea, who spent the war in Japanese military brothels serving up to 50 men per day. But city leaders soon realized that they had stepped into a major international controversy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Dennis Lim
World War II and its aftermath loom large in the endlessly rich expanse of 20th century Japanese cinema. But no major Japanese director was as visibly affected by this defining trauma as Masaki Kobayashi (1916-96). An art history student, Kobayashi decided to take up filmmaking when the Pacific war broke out, convinced that cinema was a more urgent medium for a time of crisis. Mere months after securing an apprenticeship at the Shochiku studio, he was conscripted into the Japanese Army in Manchuria, where, as an act of resistance, he refused to rise above the rank of private.
OPINION
January 18, 2013 | By Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman
This month 75 years ago, the people of Nanking, China's ancient capital city, were in the midst of one of the worst atrocities in history, the infamous Rape of Nanking. The truth of what actually happened is at the center of a bitter dispute between China and Japan that continues to play out in present-day relations. Many Chinese see Japan's election last month of ultraconservative nationalist Shinzo Abe as prime minister as just the latest in a string of insults. And it was recently reported that Japan is considering rolling back its 1993 apology regarding "comfort women," the thousands of women the Japanese army sexually enslaved during World War II. In 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army, captured Nanking on Dec. 13. No one knows the exact toll the Japanese soldiers exacted on its citizens, but a postwar Allied investigation put the numbers at more than 200,000 killed and at least 20,000 women and girls raped in the six weeks after the city fell.
NEWS
June 1, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Mei Shigenobu's eighth birthday, her mother revealed a closely guarded secret: Everyone living in their house was a member of the Japanese Red Army terrorist group. "I've known that since I was 3 or 4," she told her mother, a woman on Japan's most-wanted list. "But you seemed to want to keep it a secret, so I pretended not to know."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
She is small and frail, her shimmering pink hanbok dress cloaking a darkness in her heart that others will never be able to fully comprehend. Soon-Duk Kim does not like speaking about her memories. But she has drawn them. The portraits that convey the pain of her capture and use as a military sex slave by the Japanese army during World War II are vivid and disturbing. They have also been a part of healing.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | MICHAEL HIRSH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Forty-five years ago, Shigeo Yamada was an officer of the Japanese Imperial Navy clinging to the wreckage of his cruiser in the murky waters off Okinawa. Around him bobbed the remnants of Japan's last naval offensive of World War II. Like his comrades, Yamada was bitter over his fate at the hands of U.S. dive bombers. But there was a difference. Yamada was an American.
BOOKS
October 17, 1999
To the Editor: I was extremely disappointed to read Joshua Fogel's letter (Book Review, Aug. 15), regarding Harriet Mill's review of "The Good Man of Nanking: The Diaries of John Rabe." He wrote that my book, "The Rape of Nanking," was not only based on "flimsy" evidence, but "roundly criticized by historians who have investigated the topic, especially those fundamentally sympathetic to her project of bringing the Nanking Massacre to the attention of concerned people everywhere." Describing evidence as flimsy and reviews of my book as roundly critical are characterizations, not arguments, and are very much at variance with the characterizations of others.
BOOKS
October 17, 1999
To the Editor: I was extremely disappointed to read Joshua Fogel's letter (Book Review, Aug. 15), regarding Harriet Mill's review of "The Good Man of Nanking: The Diaries of John Rabe." He wrote that my book, "The Rape of Nanking," was not only based on "flimsy" evidence, but "roundly criticized by historians who have investigated the topic, especially those fundamentally sympathetic to her project of bringing the Nanking Massacre to the attention of concerned people everywhere." Describing evidence as flimsy and reviews of my book as roundly critical are characterizations, not arguments, and are very much at variance with the characterizations of others.
OPINION
March 14, 1999 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn, a senior editor at the New Republic, recently returned after several months in Japan
As Japan remains mired in recession, one of its few growth industries is neonationalism. Among intellectuals, bureaucrats and politicians in the dominant Liberal Democratic Party, resentment of what they regard as American hectoring about Japan's crimes against humanity during World War II and also U.S. economic dominance are making anti-American feelings run at an all-time high.
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