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June 17, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
Despite its vibrant Japanese community, Los Angeles has not seen a major exhibition of contemporary art from Japan in living memory. At one time such an oversight might have been explicable, if not forgivable. For years, nobody was certain if the nation produced new art that could be called either Japanese or contemporary.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2014
John Cacavas Composer's career was helped by Telly Savalas John Cacavas, 83, a composer, arranger and conductor who parlayed his friendship with actor Telly Savalas into a prolific career scoring music for film and television, including a theme to "Kojak," died Jan. 28 at his home in Beverly Hills, his family announced. He had been in declining health. While working in London in the early 1970s, Cacavas met Savalas. He agreed to produce an album for the actor, who promised to help the composer get into the film business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By David Ng
It's widely known that Larry Ellison, the co-founder and chief executive officer of Oracle, loves fast yachts, fast airplanes and expensive Malibu real estate. The billionaire has also made no secret of his love of Japanese culture, and has amassed an impressive collection of priceless Japanese art spanning thousands of years. Ellison is giving the public its first taste of his Japanese art collection in an exhibition that opened over the weekend at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By David Ng
It's widely known that Larry Ellison, the co-founder and chief executive officer of Oracle, loves fast yachts, fast airplanes and expensive Malibu real estate. The billionaire has also made no secret of his love of Japanese culture, and has amassed an impressive collection of priceless Japanese art spanning thousands of years. Ellison is giving the public its first taste of his Japanese art collection in an exhibition that opened over the weekend at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Seventeen years have passed since Robert T. Singer, curator of Japanese art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, spotted an extraordinary pair of 18th century screens in an exhibition at the Kyoto University Museum of Art. Smitten with Maruyama Okyo's exquisitely detailed depiction of 17 life-size cranes on a glowing background of gold leaf, he decided that LACMA had to have the rare and valuable artwork. It took 13 years, amid many other projects, for Singer to find the owner of the privately held screens.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | Marylouise Oates
"Just come back in the daylight to see it," mega-collector and contributor Joe Price kept telling the black-tie crowd Saturday night at the gala dinner celebrating the opening of the Pavilion for Japanese Art. "See us in daylight. Don't judge by tonight." "He's been running around inside, adjusting the lights, all evening," Dee Sherwood said, explaining that the building "glows in the daytime." Daisy Belin agreed, saying that Price had asked her, "Promise me you'll come in the daylight."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1986 | CHRIS PASLES
Kabuki is a form of total theater, according to Leonard Pronko, who will demonstrate the style at 2:30 p.m. Monday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. "Kabuki uses everything the theater has to offer," Pronko said. "The actor projects a character as a Western actor does, but he also uses his voice through all its ranges as a singer would and his body as a dancer does. "To have a great Kabuki actor, you would have to have a Nureyev, a Pavarotti and an Olivier all in one."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
A long-smoldering dispute over the treatment of a $30-million collection of Japanese artworks promised to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art by Joe D. and Etsuko Price has erupted in a lawsuit. In a complaint filed on Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court, the Prices are seeking the return of an unspecified number of artworks that have been placed on loan at the museum but are not part of the collection they have promised to the museum. They claim that the museum refuses to return the works.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
Americans have the feeling that Japan is swiping our car market, annexing our downtown real estate, cornering the market on electronic gadgets and buying up all the luxury trinkets on Rodeo Drive. We are protectively scornful when a Japanese corporation pays $43 million for a shopworn Van Gogh and nervously amused when the New York Times reports that snooty Fifth Avenue shops put discreet signs in vitrines whispering "Japanese Spoken Here." Our politicians like to create the impression that the Japanese miracle is just some sneaky illusion created by unfair trade practices, but secretly the thermometer of our admiration for them just keeps rising.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
There is really nothing new about the current Western fascination with Japan. It has been thus ever since the French Impressionists discovered Japanese prints in the curio shops of Paris. Neither is there much novelty in the fact that our fascination focuses on Japanese art. Japan and its art have become synonymous in the Western mind. Germany can be conceived without thinking art, not so Japan. The latest round of beguilement seems to have a new twist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, an acclaimed Swiss architect is hoping to pull off what an acclaimed Dutch one could not. Next month LACMA will publicly unveil a $650-million plan by Pritzker Prize winner Peter Zumthor for a dramatic new museum building along Wilshire Boulevard. If completed it would rank as one of the most significant works of architecture to rise in Los Angeles since Frank Gehry's Walt Disney Concert Hall opened 10 years ago. It would also require demolishing the core of the museum's campus, including the original 1965 buildings by William L. Pereira and a 1986 addition by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates of New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Seventeen years have passed since Robert T. Singer, curator of Japanese art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, spotted an extraordinary pair of 18th century screens in an exhibition at the Kyoto University Museum of Art. Smitten with Maruyama Okyo's exquisitely detailed depiction of 17 life-size cranes on a glowing background of gold leaf, he decided that LACMA had to have the rare and valuable artwork. It took 13 years, amid many other projects, for Singer to find the owner of the privately held screens.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Rosemary McClure
The five-star view will remain the same, but lots of other changes are planned for Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo when it officially changes its name Jan. 1. The hotel has operated as the Four Seasons Hotel Tokyo at Chinzanso for the last 20 years. Fujita Kanko, the property's owner, is investing $90 million to renovate Hotel Chinzanso Tokyo, which is known for its 16-acre Japanese botanical garden. Chinzanso means “villa on a mountain of camellias.”  Among the upgrades are a new rooftop, meeting and event space, and Cafe Foresta, an open-kitchen-style restaurant specializing in sweets.  "We possess a truly unique property, an urban resort in a lush garden setting," said Kouichi Urashima, the new general manager and a veteran hotelier.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By David Ng
Los Angeles art gallery Blum & Poe is opening an office in Tokyo to strengthen its ties with Asian artists, the gallery said this week. Ashley Rawlings, a former managing editor at ArtAsiaPacific, has been named director of the office. Blum & Poe, located near Culver City, already represents some prominent names in Asian art, including Takashi Murakami, Yoshitomo Nara, Lee Ufan and Zhang Huan. The gallery said that Tokyo was selected given the gallery's long-standing relationship with Japan and Japanese artists, as well as to "promote our entire gallery program in the region.
TRAVEL
June 24, 2012 | Ryan Ritchie
About 55,000 people call Hanford, Calif., home, but the town is filled with enough history to accommodate a city of millions. Downtown is a must-see thanks to the Hanford Civic Auditorium (1924), the Kings County Courthouse (1896), the Hanford Fox Theatre (1929) and a 1920s ice cream parlor named Superior Dairy Products Co. There's also the China Alley Historic District from 1882, as well as a 1922 building now used as the Temple Theater. This history gives visitors a glimpse of the past, as Hanford's slow pace of life exemplifies the way things used to be. The bed It's not everyone's cup of tea, but with amenities such as pull-chain toilets, pedestal sinks and clawfoot bathtubs, the Irwin Street Inn (522 N. Irwin St.; [559]
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dragons, graffiti, cartoon heroes. Gajin Fujita is known for mixing Japanese art with L.A. street and pop culture in paintings fueled by his eclectic imagination and experiences as a Japanese American from Boyle Heights. The Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena is spotlighting a major influence on these East-meets-Eastside creations: Fujita's passion for ukiyo-e , the woodblock prints that flourished in 17th- to 19th-century Japan. "Gajin Fujita: Ukiyo-e in Contemporary Painting," which opened in April, is what curator Bridget Bray calls "a focused solo exhibition of five pieces in which you see parallels to the print tradition such as dynamic compositions, martial figures, attention to surface detail and dramatization of the natural and supernatural worlds.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 1986 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Elizabeth Venant is a Times staff writer
Joe D. Price is posing for pictures in front of a 17th-Century Japanese screen before which feudal warlords once sat to receive their subjects. A latter-day ruler of Edo art treasures from Japan, Price seems about as pleased as an ornery samurai. His chin juts forward, his gray hair swirls like an unruly wreath around his balding pate, and his sometimes venomous tongue darts out of his mouth. "I don't know what you need so many pictures for," he chides the photographer.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | RANDYE HODER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert J. Lang can't wait to get home from the office--just so he can start his paperwork. Lang, a physicist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, loves to spend evenings practicing origami, the ancient Japanese art of folding paper into animals, flowers and other intricate designs. By following instructions in a book for children, Lang made his first design--a dinosaur--at the age of 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Take a walk with genius, and there's no telling where you might end up. One day in 1953, Joe Price found himself strolling Manhattan's East Side with Frank Lloyd Wright, escorting the great architect to his pied à terre at the Plaza Hotel following a visit to the site where Wright hoped to plant his Guggenheim Museum. Suddenly, Wright got a hankering to look at Japanese woodblock prints (he avidly collected them for most of his life, and Japan is the only country outside of North America where he worked)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By Liesl Bradner
It was the simple clacking of two wooden sticks on a street corner that signaled to children the start of kamishibai , a popular pastime during Depression-era Japan. Kamishibai means "street theater using painted illustrations." Author Eric P. Nash examines the little-known art form and predecessor to modern-day anime and manga in his recent book "Manga Kamishibai: The Art of Japanese Paper Theater," published by Abrams ComicArts. Storytellers would travel from town to town with their butai (miniature stage)
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