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February 21, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
That the French Impressionists were influenced by traditional Japanese artists is a fact well known. Fewer people are aware, however, that the process worked in reverse. "Paris in Japan: The Japanese Encounter With European Painting," Tuesday through April 3 at UCLA's Frederick S. Wight Art Gallery, illuminates this East-bound assimilation.
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January 31, 2014 | By Charles Solomon
Legendary Japanese animator Katsuhiro Otomo is known around the world for his work, particularly his groundbreaking cyberpunk action feature "Akira. " But Otomo doesn't spend time watching his own films. "The truth is, I don't read or watch my own creations," Otomo says. "When I'm creating something, I'm 100% immersed in that universe, so when I'm finished, I'm ready to journey to a different world. Once a work is completed, it belongs to the readers and viewers. " One of the most influential artists working in animation today, Otomo will receive the Winsor McCay Award for career achievement at the Annie Awards on Saturday.
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March 18, 1996 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Globally, Los Angeles is a kind of cultural border town between East and West. No wonder, then, that an exhibition of Japanese painting seems so at home in the modest seaside Long Beach Museum of Art. The sensibility of the island nation has influenced L.A. art from its Craftsman architecture to its Assemblage and Light and Space art.
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January 9, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
With the new year comes the blast of new art that hits every January. What could be called an “Artapalooza” starts Thursday night with the monthly Downtown L.A. Art Walk. Saturday brings a high concentration of citywide gallery openings. And the annual Los Angeles Art Show opens at the convention center downtown on Wednesday. “Photo L.A.” opens at the L.A. Mart downtown on Jan. 16. And a new downtown art exhibition space, the Mistake Room, which will feature contemporary artists from around the globe, opens Jan. 18 Culture Monster will be posting dispatches from next week's L.A. Art Show starting at Wednesday's artist and celeb-heavy patron party, hosted by Tim Robbins.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2010 | Yuriko Nagano
Aya Yokura spends her days hunched over white sheets of paper, drawing intricately costumed characters whose creation can be painstaking and time-consuming. For the last two years, she has spent up to 100 hours a week at her workstation — a low-paying, labor-intensive job that helps bring Japan's famous style of animated cartoons to life. Although the 26-year-old earns only about $10,000 a year and lives with her mom to make ends meet, she and a few thousand Japanese artists like her fill a crucial role in the technical process of creating this visual entertainment form, known as anime.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2001 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The art of every civilization is a mixture of tradition, observation and imagination. Maybe that's why a special exhibition at the Pacific Asia Museum is, initially, a little puzzling. Titled "The Nature of the Beast," about 50 drawings, scrolls and screens set out to show us how traditional Japanese art depicts animals. Earlier Japanese artists copied Chinese art. They were less interested in what animals really looked like than what they symbolized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI
A collection of rare books illustrated by Japanese artists during the Edo Period will be on exhibit this month at the Cal State Northridge library. The collection, assembled by anthropologist and CSUN professor emeritus Robert Ravicz over a 25-year period, was recently acquired by the Chiba City Museum of Art in Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Gallery owner Jeffrey Fraenkel is making his hometown even more of a destination for photography, donating 26 works by Diane Arbus to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The 26 photos come from a series Arbus made between 1969 and 1971 that document mentally ill patients at different institutions. They will bring SFMOMA's total count of Arbus images to 64, making it the West Coast's largest repository of her works. The museum also announced the receipt of two other major gifts.
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February 29, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
The 1950s have settled into memory as a yawningly dull period of American history. But in terms of art, the decade was packed with excitement. The flowering of Abstract Expressionism! The ascendancy of New York as an art center! The birth of Pop art! In Los Angeles, the '50s also brought an explosive development in ceramics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2002
Dean Kuipers' article indicates a new creativity emerging in Japanese popular music ("Made in Japan," March 31). This is both a welcome sign and perhaps no big surprise. Although I am an artist living in Tokyo (and previously a New York-based electronic music composer), I am not familiar with this music. But I found it significant that with both Buffalo Daughter and Cornelius, the word "nowhere" figures prominently, ostensibly in the sense that their latest music is not borrowed from other music from anywhere in particular, that it is more original (and that this is newsworthy)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2013 | By Scarlet Cheng
NEW YORK - In the mid-1950s, Japanese artist Kazuo Shiraga took action painting to new heights. Though trained as a traditional brush painter, he tossed them. He tried painting with his fingers, then in public performances he spread paint on paper or canvas with his bare feet. In more elaborate versions, he suspended himself from overhead ropes and swung his body freely, his feet swirling the paint below. "It was by removing himself from his training that he was able to fully express himself," says Ming Tiampo, co-curator of a new exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum featuring Shiraga and fellow members of the Gutai Art Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Gallery owner Jeffrey Fraenkel is making his hometown even more of a destination for photography, donating 26 works by Diane Arbus to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The 26 photos come from a series Arbus made between 1969 and 1971 that document mentally ill patients at different institutions. They will bring SFMOMA's total count of Arbus images to 64, making it the West Coast's largest repository of her works. The museum also announced the receipt of two other major gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Ken Price, the great Los Angeles sculptor who died in February at 77, always operated just below the threshold of first-tier international acclaim. Widely admired by a knowledgeable coterie of collectors, critics and other artists, he had the dubious misfortune to work with clay — an art material that, despite its ancient pedigree, languishes in a modern ghetto. All that is poised to change. "Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective" kicks off the fall art season Sept. 16 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art before traveling to museums in Texas and New York.
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May 6, 2012 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Dragons, graffiti, cartoon heroes. Gajin Fujita is known for mixing Japanese art with L.A. street and pop culture in paintings fueled by his eclectic imagination and experiences as a Japanese American from Boyle Heights. The Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena is spotlighting a major influence on these East-meets-Eastside creations: Fujita's passion for ukiyo-e , the woodblock prints that flourished in 17th- to 19th-century Japan. "Gajin Fujita: Ukiyo-e in Contemporary Painting," which opened in April, is what curator Bridget Bray calls "a focused solo exhibition of five pieces in which you see parallels to the print tradition such as dynamic compositions, martial figures, attention to surface detail and dramatization of the natural and supernatural worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
When curator Max Presneill first planned the "Gateway Japan" exhibition, which opens Saturday at the Torrance Art Museum, his aim was to raise awareness of 14 contemporary Japanese artists and how their work resembles or differs from the seven Japanese Americans who are also in the show. But as Japan copes with death and destruction from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, Presneill and his staff and volunteers at the city-run museum have transformed the art opening into an opportunity to raise money for disaster relief.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2010 | Yuriko Nagano
Aya Yokura spends her days hunched over white sheets of paper, drawing intricately costumed characters whose creation can be painstaking and time-consuming. For the last two years, she has spent up to 100 hours a week at her workstation — a low-paying, labor-intensive job that helps bring Japan's famous style of animated cartoons to life. Although the 26-year-old earns only about $10,000 a year and lives with her mom to make ends meet, she and a few thousand Japanese artists like her fill a crucial role in the technical process of creating this visual entertainment form, known as anime.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1996
As a postscript to Kristine McKenna's excellent article about Jon Blair's documentary "Anne Frank Remembered" ("Dearest of Diaries," Feb. 18): While visiting Japan last year, I had the opportunity of seeing a new feature-length animated film, "The Diary of Anne Frank." Unlikely as a cartoon version of this famous tragedy might sound, animation in Japan is taken seriously, and the subject matter was treated with unusual delicacy by the Japanese artists who made the film. The drama was abetted with a sensitive musical score by Michael Nyman of "The Piano" fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | ALAN M. BROWN, Brown is a free-lance writer in Tokyo. and
"I think that some of the most interesting artists working here and those working in the States, their ideas are connected. Artists are these amazing sensors, and they're always two years ahead of what other people are thinking," said Barbara London, the director of New York's Museum of Modern Art video program. London, who established MOMA's Video Exhibition Program and Video Study Center (the first new medium MOMA has added since it was founded), was on her fifth professional visit to Japan.
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June 6, 2010 | By Samantha Page, Los Angeles Times
Two hundred years ago, Dutch merchants opened shipments of porcelain from Japan to find the packing material was delicate rice paper, printed with brightly colored scenes of Japanese life. When the prints arrived, it didn't take long for some of the artists behind them to be recognized as masters. Mass-produced from carved woodblocks, the images were known as ukiyo-e . Today, the "images of the floating world" continue to be appreciated as more than so many little bits of paper.
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