Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapanese Asia
IN THE NEWS

Japanese Asia

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another furor over Japan's World War II deeds, a Japanese Cabinet minister said Friday that this nation did not intend to wage a war of aggression and that its policies led to Asia's independence and economic growth. But Shin Sakurai, Environmental Agency chief, retracted his statement as "inappropriate" hours later at an emergency news conference after the South Korean government lodged a vehement protest.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese police, seizing $7.9 million in cash and 22 pounds of gold, discovered a huge cache of toxic chemicals similar to those used in the lethal assault on Tokyo's subways in a massive raid Wednesday on the secretive religious group Aum Supreme Truth.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese police, seizing $7.9 million in cash and 22 pounds of gold, discovered a huge cache of toxic chemicals similar to those used in the lethal assault on Tokyo's subways in a massive raid Wednesday on the secretive religious group Aum Supreme Truth.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another furor over Japan's World War II deeds, a Japanese Cabinet minister said Friday that this nation did not intend to wage a war of aggression and that its policies led to Asia's independence and economic growth. But Shin Sakurai, Environmental Agency chief, retracted his statement as "inappropriate" hours later at an emergency news conference after the South Korean government lodged a vehement protest.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, beleaguered by a controversy over his personal finances, announced today that he intends to resign. Hosokawa, who took over last August after 38 years of unbroken rule by the Liberal Democratic Party, said he will step down because of an impasse in Parliament over charges that he received an illicit $952,000 payment from a gangster-tainted parcel-delivery firm. Hosokawa called the transactions "something for which I must take moral responsibility."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1999
Pilots and crews flew air supply routes in World War II over "The Hump" from India to China and Burma, struggling to establish freedom by defeating the Japanese in Asia. The flights over the Himalayas consisted of planes taking off around the clock in all kinds of weather, braving violent storms, lightning, ice, raging winds, enemy aircraft. The primitive, two-engine propeller planes were unable to fly higher than many mountain peaks. These air transports delivered high-octane gasoline, ammunition, pipelines, food, soldiers and other vital supplies to the Americans, British and Chinese forces.
OPINION
June 26, 1994 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Center for the New West and an international fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Business in Los Angeles. He is also business-trends analyst for Fox TV
As did the Olympics a decade ago, the World Cup represents far more than a $600-million short-term stimulus to the local economy. After five years of man-made and natural disasters, the games offer an opportunity to redefine the region in terms of its global, multiracial future. The Los Angeles of 1984 was, in many ways, quite dependent on the rest of America, bulking up on Pentagon steroids and selling to a mostly domestic audience.
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | Alex Alexiev, Alex Alexiev writes frequently on Soviet and East European affairs
President Boris N. Yeltsin's recently announced economic plan of free prices, budget-cutting, privatization and private property represents a turning point in Russian history. In the words of a Moscow wiseacre, " Perestroika is dead, long live perestroika. " This emerging era of Russian capitalism also may hold tremendous economic opportunities for the United States. U.S. policy vis-a-vis the Kremlin has been anything but a smashing success during the last five years.
OPINION
July 22, 2004 | MAX BOOT, Max Boot is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
If you want to know what's wrong with the CIA -- and these days who doesn't? -- start with the fact that it's almost 60 years old. How many 60-year-olds do you know who take insane risks, rethink cherished shibboleths and produce brilliant flashes of insight? That is what's required to win the war on Islamist terror. But, like many other prosperous geezers, the CIA would prefer to hit the links and avoid uncouth places where nobody has heard of Metamucil. Don't get me wrong.
OPINION
February 21, 1993 | JOEL KOTKIN and DAVID FRIEDMAN, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the Center for the New West and an international fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Business and Management. David Friedman, an attorney, is a visiting fellow in the MIT Japan program.
The two-day California economic summit unfolded in a time-warp. It was at least two years too late to deal seriously with the deepest problems brought on by the reces sion. Unable to draw up a specific blueprint to guide even the most urgently needed reforms--streamlining regulations and overhauling workers' compensation--the summiteers barely touched on the issue of how to handle the state's long-term economic future.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa, beleaguered by a controversy over his personal finances, announced today that he intends to resign. Hosokawa, who took over last August after 38 years of unbroken rule by the Liberal Democratic Party, said he will step down because of an impasse in Parliament over charges that he received an illicit $952,000 payment from a gangster-tainted parcel-delivery firm. Hosokawa called the transactions "something for which I must take moral responsibility."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2000
A week into the year 2000, Orange County reckons with its future. The changing face of the county's population was evident in a bit of celebratory symbolism last weekend. The new year's first births came to immigrant couples from Cambodia and Mexico. The promise of the future rests in part with these parents, their new children, and all citizens who will share this county with them. Making our new ethnic diversity an asset provides both a challenge and an opportunity for the county.
BUSINESS
December 20, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Carlos Salinas de Gortari took office five years ago, he pledged to make Mexico a Pacific Rim nation, economically as well as geographically. During his term, Mexico joined influential Pacific Rim organizations, culminating last month in the country's inclusion in the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. But Mexico's relations with Asia have been disappointing in one crucial respect: investment.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|