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Japanese Brazil

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NEWS
November 16, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
At baseball games here, fans do not ask for hot dogs or peanuts. They are more likely to order sushi or Japanese noodle soup. Many Brazilians, in fact, assume that baseball originated in Japan, and it's easy to understand why. After all, the thousands who play baseball here are overwhelmingly nikkei , Brazilians of Japanese origin. Game announcers at Sao Paulo's baseball stadium call out the plays in Japanese as well as Portuguese, Brazil's official language.
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NEWS
November 16, 1987 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
At baseball games here, fans do not ask for hot dogs or peanuts. They are more likely to order sushi or Japanese noodle soup. Many Brazilians, in fact, assume that baseball originated in Japan, and it's easy to understand why. After all, the thousands who play baseball here are overwhelmingly nikkei , Brazilians of Japanese origin. Game announcers at Sao Paulo's baseball stadium call out the plays in Japanese as well as Portuguese, Brazil's official language.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House, taking the first steps in a process to boost U.S. exports and protect American patents, Friday identified trading partners that the Administration contends discriminate against American companies or allow U.S. products to be pirated. Among the countries named were Japan, whose government procurement policies the White House said continue to discriminate against American companies, and Brazil, India and Thailand, which were singled out as the worst violators of U.S.
BOOKS
October 11, 1992 | Michael Harris, Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review
Karen Tei Yamashita has a big talent. And she has a talent for bigness, which isn't necessarily the same thing. Her first novel, "Through the Arc of the Rain Forest," was a jungle of genres, a dense interweaving of realism and fantasy, a satire on nothing less than modern industrial civilization. "Brazil-Maru," a more conventional novel, takes on another sprawling subject: Japanese immigration to Brazil. The details are exotic, but the story is familiar.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, Peter Y. Hong is a Times staff writer. and
Angelita Low, 27, speaks English to her friends, Spanish at work and Chinese at home. That's life when you're a Chinese American teacher of bilingual classes from a Nicaraguan town called Bonanza. Her tri-cultural balancing act is an increasingly common experience in Los Angeles, which provides a window on an overlooked dimension of history: The Latin American nations that send immigrants to Los Angeles are ethnically diverse societies that have drawn immigrants from throughout the world.
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