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BUSINESS
July 4, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Japanese business confidence rose to its best level in nearly three years, adding to indications that the central bank may raise interest rates as early as this month. The Bank of Japan's quarterly tankan index of large manufacturers' sentiment rose to +3 in June from -9 in March. That's the first time since September 1997 that the index is positive, which means more manufacturers are optimistic about the economy than pessimistic.
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WORLD
September 16, 2012 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - Anti-Japan rallies spread to dozens more Chinese cities Sunday, as thousands of people demonstrated against the Japanese government's plan to buy several uninhabited islands near Taiwan that China also claims. Protesters marched in front of diplomatic compounds, attacked Japanese businesses and burned Japanese flags. In the southern city of Guangzhou, demonstrators stormed into the first two floors of a complex that houses the Japanese Consulate, breaking windows in a hotel and smashing a vehicle.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
A new and different sun may be rising. The Japan that President Clinton visits this week is poised for an economic recovery after five years of recession and for a technology-led transformation of business similar to that experienced by U.S. companies in recent years.
WORLD
May 25, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Looking back, Japanese businessman Tomatsu Ito says, he might as well have moved to Mars rather than a few hours' flight away to China. Unlike in his publicly polite homeland, drivers in Dalian were chaotic, often careening through crowded crosswalks. Worse, he couldn't muster even the most basic Chinese. Often desperate, he would phone JianHua Yang, his second in charge at the branch office of an Osaka, Japan-based software company. Yang is a Dalian native who, like many here, speaks Japanese.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the American black community, angered by continued signs of apparent Japanese racism, are planning a series of meetings this week to plot a strategy for government and private action or even a possible black boycott of Japanese goods. "I think our patience is running out," said Rep. Walter Fauntroy (D-D.C.), the non-voting congressional representative of the District of Columbia. "We are very close to taking some concrete steps."
BUSINESS
May 9, 1990 | CRISTINA LEE, Times staff writer
Irvine, which is home to two major Japanese manufacturers, ranks among the three most popular areas for Japanese business people to live in the Southland, according to a survey by the Japan Business Assn. of Southern California. The survey, conducted in January, calculates the number of Japanese-nationalbusiness people's children enrolled in Southern California schools. Two other areas popular with Japanese business people are the city of Arcadia and the South Bay area.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
From its first moments "Free and Easy" (Little Tokyo Cinema 1), a warm and bracing comedy, proves impossible to predict. In the pre-credit sequence we meet a truly happy man, the stocky, good-natured Densuke (Toshiyuki Nishida). He lives with his devoted wife, Michiko (Eri Ishida), in Southern Japan on an island with a Carmel-like coastline. He begins each day joyously fishing before taking a ferry to work as a salesman for a Tokyo-based construction company.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The attorney for the businessman accused of engineering an $11-million kickback scheme at American Honda Motor Co. says he will put Japanese business practices and trade relations on trial Tuesday when the racketeering and fraud case gets under way in Concord, N.H.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
At a time of tension between Japanese business and American minorities, there was good news last fall when the Japanese began expressing interest in a huge development project taking shape on the edge of Harlem. Japanese interest in the Harlem-on-the-Hudson project began with a visit in October, 1987, by Japanese Crown Prince Akihito and Princess Michiko, followed early this year by visits from a stream of Japanese executives.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mayor Tom Bradley kicked off the Los Angeles Festival in San Pedro earlier this month, he stood behind a podium draped with the name of Occidental Petroleum Corp., a sponsor of the event since it was launched in 1984. The oil company's chairman, Armand Hammer, also was on hand to speak. Less visible to the public, however, has been the role of one group of executives whose support was considered crucial to this latest festival--the Japanese business community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | Diana Wagman, Wagman, a Cal State Long Beach professor, is the author of the novels "Skin Deep," "Spontaneous" and "Bump."
The Japanese have a fiction genre called "business novels." Like American noir, which reflects our particular tradition of one man against all odds, independent and alone, the Japanese business novel is rooted in their background of amae, translated as "indulgent dependency." The business novel is about one's sacrifice of self for the good of the company, the ability to bow to industrial development. Insights and intrigue about a company's inner workings as well as the psychologies of businessmen and women make these very popular in Japan.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
General Electric Co. said it would take a third-quarter charge of $300 million to $400 million to exit the sub-prime mortgage market. The costs are among total charges of $1.7 billion to $1.9 billion, including $900 million to $1 billion to write down the value of Lake, GE's Japanese personal-loan operation, and $500 million for restructuring efforts in GE's industrial operations. GE plans to sell the Japanese business. In announcing its second-quarter earnings in July, GE said it dumped $3.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
The self-styled rebel of Japanese business was convicted today of breaking securities laws after a prosecution that many here saw as an attempt by the corporate establishment to snuff out a financial upstart whose only crime was his refusal to play by traditional rules. The Tokyo District Court found fallen Internet mogul Takafumi Horie guilty of misleading markets about the financial health of his Livedoor business empire to drive up its stock price. He was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail.
WORLD
May 24, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Delivering a sharp diplomatic rebuke to Japan, Chinese Vice Premier Wu Yi cut short a fence-mending visit here Monday, a day early and just a few hours before she was to meet with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. Wu was the most senior Chinese official to visit Japan in two years; her trip had been described as an attempt to improve the strained atmosphere between Asia's two biggest powers. But Monday morning, she told her hosts that she was returning to Beijing early.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2005 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
It's easy to see Japan's rising economic presence in this fast-growing southern Chinese city. Japanese automakers have built up such a beachhead that some call this area China's new Detroit. Every morning, 30 blue-and-white buses rumble along winding streets, taking hundreds of Honda employees to the automaker's factories here. Honda and Nissan vehicles may be as familiar here as in Los Angeles. It's not just autos.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Japanese business confidence rose to its highest in more than three years in September, and companies are plowing rising profits back into their businesses. While that's boosting economic growth, the pace of the recovery is poised to slow, analysts said. The Bank of Japan's quarterly tankan survey showed confidence among large manufacturers rose to 10 points in September from 3 in June.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1990 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Takashi Nakamura, the top Los Angeles official of Japan's largest advertising agency, took his videotapes to Tokyo from Southern California. And they added up to a grim message for the audience of 600 senior Japanese executives gathered in Dentsu Inc.'s office in the Tsukiji district. "I always thought this is the United States, but Japan is buying everything," one Southern California resident said. "They lost the war so they are trying to win this way," said a woman in her 60s.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Politicians are pumping $171 billion into yet another gargantuan stimulus package aimed at jump-starting the anemic Japanese economy. But one retailer is making his own economic miracle come true a buck at a time. Daiso Industries Co., one of the few booming chains in Japan these days, sells every item in its stores for 100 yen--slightly less than $1. It already packs more than 1,300 outlets, known as 100 Yen Plazas, into a country roughly the size of California, and it's growing exponentially.
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