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SPORTS
March 31, 1990
Hide Koga, a minor league pitcher in the 1960s, has been named manager of the Salinas Spurs of the Class-A California League, becoming the first Japanese manager of an American baseball team.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
January 20, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
A very good chance exists that a Japanese pitcher will be in the starting rotation of the Dodgers, Angels and Padres this baseball season. With luck, Hideo Nomo could oppose Shigetoshi Hasegawa when the Angels make their history-making June 17-18 visit to Dodger Stadium, and then perhaps Nomo could face Hideki Irabu a week later, when San Diego is in town. Irabu isn't signed yet. He is 6 feet 4, can throw a ball 100 mph and is nicknamed "The Irabu Express," a la Nolan Ryan.
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NEWS
June 28, 1988
Embarrassed city officials in Sunnyvale promised to purge from city resolution an anti-Japanese ordinance that was adopted during the hysteria of World War II. The 44-year-old resolution states that it is the official policy of Sunnyvale, now a bustling city in the heart of the high-tech "Silicon Valley," to distrust the Japanese and "permanently exclude them from the state of California."
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | Associated Press
A Japanese exchange student who was shot twice in the back of the head died Saturday, shortly after his parents arrived from Japan. Masakazu Kuriyama, 25, died at John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, where paramedics took him after two passersby found him near a Concord transit station. Investigators have no suspects or motive in the case. His parents were with the young man when doctors took him off life support systems, said Steve Durkee of the host family with whom Kuriyama stayed.
SPORTS
January 20, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
A very good chance exists that a Japanese pitcher will be in the starting rotation of the Dodgers, Angels and Padres this baseball season. With luck, Hideo Nomo could oppose Shigetoshi Hasegawa when the Angels make their history-making June 17-18 visit to Dodger Stadium, and then perhaps Nomo could face Hideki Irabu a week later, when San Diego is in town. Irabu isn't signed yet. He is 6 feet 4, can throw a ball 100 mph and is nicknamed "The Irabu Express," a la Nolan Ryan.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
They are the future business leaders of Japan and they are here this summer, in conspicuously untrendy Santa Paula, to bone up on English and immerse themselves in American culture. And though they're just 65 miles northwest of pace-setting Los Angeles, students from Tokyo International Business College are purposely keeping their distance. They're not on the lookout for duck sausage pizzas, Surf Nazis, jet propulsion scientists or Kim Basinger wanna-bes.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | Associated Press
A Japanese exchange student who was shot twice in the back of the head died Saturday, shortly after his parents arrived from Japan. Masakazu Kuriyama, 25, died at John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek, where paramedics took him after two passersby found him near a Concord transit station. Investigators have no suspects or motive in the case. His parents were with the young man when doctors took him off life support systems, said Steve Durkee of the host family with whom Kuriyama stayed.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanwa Bank California is experiencing such a slowdown in business loans that earnings could fall about 15% below the Japanese-owned bank's target, the company told its managers in a recent memo obtained by The Times. The disclosure is further evidence that commercial lending in California is slowing amid a cooling off of the state's economy and tighter lending practices that some have attributed to tougher reviews by regulators.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Japanese real estate investors can let their fingers do the walking. A new magazine pitched to them, California Real Estate Guide, will come off the presses in May. Based in Costa Mesa, the guide will feature ads in Japanese on California commercial buildings and residences. The magazine says it will have a mailing list of 2,500 real estate companies, banks, trading firms and individuals in Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
His hands are like bronze mitts - cracked and weathered by labor, age and too much sun. But his touch is soft. He cups the branch of a willowy shrub and nods toward the hills for which it is named. "This is a Hollywood juniper," Tadashi Hamada says. He knows the breed well. An evergreen with twisted tufts, it is native to his birth country, Japan. This one is planted in front of his Mid-City home, where the paint peels and the stoop sags. Fishing a pair of clippers from his pocket, Hamada begins to prune.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1990 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanwa Bank California is experiencing such a slowdown in business loans that earnings could fall about 15% below the Japanese-owned bank's target, the company told its managers in a recent memo obtained by The Times. The disclosure is further evidence that commercial lending in California is slowing amid a cooling off of the state's economy and tighter lending practices that some have attributed to tougher reviews by regulators.
SPORTS
March 31, 1990
Hide Koga, a minor league pitcher in the 1960s, has been named manager of the Salinas Spurs of the Class-A California League, becoming the first Japanese manager of an American baseball team.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
They are the future business leaders of Japan and they are here this summer, in conspicuously untrendy Santa Paula, to bone up on English and immerse themselves in American culture. And though they're just 65 miles northwest of pace-setting Los Angeles, students from Tokyo International Business College are purposely keeping their distance. They're not on the lookout for duck sausage pizzas, Surf Nazis, jet propulsion scientists or Kim Basinger wanna-bes.
NEWS
June 28, 1988
Embarrassed city officials in Sunnyvale promised to purge from city resolution an anti-Japanese ordinance that was adopted during the hysteria of World War II. The 44-year-old resolution states that it is the official policy of Sunnyvale, now a bustling city in the heart of the high-tech "Silicon Valley," to distrust the Japanese and "permanently exclude them from the state of California."
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Yoya Takahashi is the new sushi chef at Hamasaku in West Los Angeles, joining recent addition Wonny Lee, the executive chef (and Bazaar by Jose Andres alum) who has brought modern touches to a revitalized Japanese-California menu. Joining dishes such as black cod with pine nut praline sauce and bone marrow with shiso gremolata are Takahashi's sushi: trumpet fish garnished with its liver and uni topped with seared scallops, for example. Takahashi, who was chef de cuisine at Sashi in Manhattan Beach and headed the sushi bar for Makoto Okuwa, is bringing a traditional sensibility (with some modernist twists)
MAGAZINE
July 26, 1987 | JOEL KOTKIN and YORIKO KISHIMOTO
THE FIRST JAPANESE in North America sailed with the Spanish from Japan in 1610, docking in Acapulco, Mexico, where 12 of 25 Japanese remained; nothing is known as to their destiny. . . . Founded in 1885, when an ex-seaman called Kame opened a restaurant on the west side of Los Angeles Street, L.A.'s Little Tokyo is the oldest Japanese settlement on the North American mainland. . . . By 1905, 3,400 Japanese lived in Los Angeles; 142 were women and 42 were children. . . .
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