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BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | PHIL NOVAK, REUTERS
North Americans are falling out of love with Niagara Falls, but their place is being taken by a growing influx of Japanese. The number of Americans visiting the world-famous falls has dropped at an annual rate of 8.4% over the past two years, a drop of more than 3 million visits. But the number of Japanese tourists to Canada jumped by a quarter in 1989 to 450,000, with Niagara Falls a favorite destination, according to government statistics.
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BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | PHIL NOVAK, REUTERS
North Americans are falling out of love with Niagara Falls, but their place is being taken by a growing influx of Japanese. The number of Americans visiting the world-famous falls has dropped at an annual rate of 8.4% over the past two years, a drop of more than 3 million visits. But the number of Japanese tourists to Canada jumped by a quarter in 1989 to 450,000, with Niagara Falls a favorite destination, according to government statistics.
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NEWS
September 23, 1988
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, saying he wanted to right a 46-year-old wrong, formally apologized to Japanese-Canadians interned during World War II and unveiled an extensive compensation package. Canada will pay $17,000 to every living Japanese-Canadian who was wrongfully incarcerated during the war. Nearly 22,000 Japanese-Canadians--of whom about 12,000 are still living--were interned after the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan.
NEWS
September 23, 1988
Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney, saying he wanted to right a 46-year-old wrong, formally apologized to Japanese-Canadians interned during World War II and unveiled an extensive compensation package. Canada will pay $17,000 to every living Japanese-Canadian who was wrongfully incarcerated during the war. Nearly 22,000 Japanese-Canadians--of whom about 12,000 are still living--were interned after the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2001 | From Reuters
Most stock markets around the world fell Friday in what some analysts fear could be a grim preview of the scheduled reopening of U.S. markets Monday. Many European markets slid to near-three-year lows as investors fled to traditional safe havens--bidding up prices of precious metals, oil and U.S. Treasuries. Analysts blamed fears of escalating violence in the aftermath of Tuesday's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. One bulwark of stability in recent years, the U.S.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Almost three years after it was convened, a 21-member commission headed by Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland on Monday presented one of the most ambitious and unusual programs ever devised for halting the deterioration of the world environment.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1995
The guest book in the farmhouse lists hometowns far from Prince Edward Island: Kyoto, Yokohama, Osaka, Okinawa and Nagoya. The names reflect a Japanese affection for Canada's smallest province, which was the setting of L.M. Montgomery's "Anne of Green Gables" novels. Packed tightly on their island nation, the Japanese are drawn to the simpler life by the sea depicted at the fictional red-haired character's 19th-Century homestead.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
When Toyota President Shoichiro Toyoda traveled to Kentucky last week to dedicate his company's new assembly plant, it was a watershed moment in the history of the American auto industry. For with Toyota's entry into domestic production, the Japanese auto industry has today virtually completed its long-heralded move to re-create a smaller version of itself halfway around the world in America's industrial heartland.
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