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May 7, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid official protests from China and South Korea, Justice Minister Shigeto Nagano on Friday withdrew his statements claiming that the 1937 Rape of Nanking was a "fabrication" and disavowing Japan's aggression in Asia. In a nationally televised news conference, he said he will accept Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata's decision about his future in the Cabinet that Hata formed eight days ago.
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NEWS
May 7, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid official protests from China and South Korea, Justice Minister Shigeto Nagano on Friday withdrew his statements claiming that the 1937 Rape of Nanking was a "fabrication" and disavowing Japan's aggression in Asia. In a nationally televised news conference, he said he will accept Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata's decision about his future in the Cabinet that Hata formed eight days ago.
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NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
China and Japan signed an accord Saturday designed to boost economic cooperation between the two countries by encouraging Japanese businesses to invest in China. "The investment protection agreement being signed today can be seen as a new starting point," Japanese Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita said at a press conference before the signing ceremony. "Medium- and small-sized enterprises in Japan are especially enthusiastic about investment in China. I have great expectations."
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
China and Japan signed an accord Saturday designed to boost economic cooperation between the two countries by encouraging Japanese businesses to invest in China. "The investment protection agreement being signed today can be seen as a new starting point," Japanese Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita said at a press conference before the signing ceremony. "Medium- and small-sized enterprises in Japan are especially enthusiastic about investment in China. I have great expectations."
NEWS
June 17, 1990
David Corcoran, 86, who helped organize the American Volunteer Group known as the Flying Tigers that fought under Gen. Claire Chennault against the Japanese in China and Burma in the late 1930s. Along with the Flying Tigers, he managed the lend-lease operation known as China Defense Supplies providing war materiel to the Chinese. After World War II, Corcoran helped set up Chennault's Asiatic airline, Civil Air Transport.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A First Look: Japan's public television Wednesday night aired rare film of the 1937 "rape" of Nanking by Japanese soldiers, showing Chinese civilians with hands tied behind their backs being shot and dumped in a ditch. No known footage of the massacre had previously been shown in Japan. The scenes, from a 30-minute documentary titled "China Invaded," were filmed with a 16-millimeter camera and smuggled out of Japanese-occupied China by an American missionary in 1938.
NEWS
July 17, 1986
China's Foreign Ministry said that the approved final version of a new Japanese history textbook deliberately covers up Japan's role in starting the 1937-45 Sino-Japanese war. China had previously complained about Japanese textbooks concerning the war, and a Foreign Ministry spokesman noted "the removal or revision of a number of obviously erroneous narrations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
George Aratani, a Los Angeles businessman who donated millions of dollars to Japanese American causes, and with his wife endowed the nation's first academic chair to study the World War II internment of people of Japanese descent and their efforts to gain redress, has died. He was 95. An entrepreneur who founded the Mikasa china and Kenwood electronics firms, Aratani died Tuesday at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center of complications of pneumonia, his daughter Linda Aratani said. He had lived at the Keiro nursing facility in Lincoln Heights since last summer.
FOOD
May 28, 2008 | Betty Hallock, Times Staff Writer
IT'S a beautifully flamboyant cracker -- a big square of a cracker, almost the size of a sheet of paper, topped with swaths of white sesame seeds, fiery-russet Japanese shichimi pepper and black-green nori powder. And it's elegant too -- thin and super-crisp and light. This dashing cracker, based on L.A. bakery Breadbar's lavash, sprang out of a collaboration between chef Noriyuki Sugie and Breadbar head baker Nicolas Lauge.
NEWS
December 3, 1991
BEFORE THE WAR . . . ...Americans had little sympathy for the Japanese, favoring China over expansion-minded Japan in 1937 by 43% to 2%, and favoring Russia in a 1938 boundary dispute with Japan by 45% to 4%. (Others either favored neither side or expressed no opinion.) But they didn't foresee war until the eve of Pearl Harbor: May, 1939 October, 1939 Foresee War With Will Japan Be Japan In Next 10 Serious Threat Years? to Peace of U.S. In Next 50 Years?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Rev. Jacob Daniel DeShazer, one of the participants in the historic Doolittle Raid on Japan during World War II, died in his sleep March 15 at his home in Salem, Ore. He was 95. After spending 40 months as a prisoner of war after the raid, DeShazer returned to Japan intent on forgiving his former captors and converting them to Christianity. During 30 years as a missionary, he helped start 23 churches in Japan. DeShazer was born Nov. 15, 1912, to an Oregon wheat-farming family.
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