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Japanese Culture

MAGAZINE
October 13, 2002 | RENEE VOGEL
I went to Japan for the first time. I went with my brother Piet and Billy Shire, who owns the Wacko store in L.A. I wanted to see the two sides of Japan that interest me. The frenetic pop culture side [is] what we did in Tokyo. Shibuya is where all the kids go to be hip and hang out. It's like Melrose Avenue but kicked up. I loved it. We went to Kyoto. That was the other side of Japanese culture, the ancient imperial state of Japan. Our host was a Japanese pop star.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
"Japan's Modern Divide" at the Getty Museum expands to full scale the classic art history course drill: slides by two artists appear side by side on the screen; compare and contrast. The show features two mid-20th-century photographers who practiced at opposite ends of the aesthetic spectrum. It could just as easily have been titled Sense and Sensibility. Or, in keeping with the didactic nature of the exercise, Subject and Subjectivity. Hiroshi Hamaya (1915-99) is far better known in the U.S. than his counterpart, Kansuke Yamamoto (1914-87)
NEWS
February 5, 2006 | Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press Writer
Masa sits on the couch in his apartment with his arm around Konoha's shoulders, gently brushing her hair away from her bright blue eyes. Iris stands behind them, decked out in a frilly dress. Masa speaks warmly to Konoha and Iris, greeting them brightly each morning and when he returns from work, but they never answer. His companions are life-sized dolls. Konoha is his favorite.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1997 | DON SNOWDEN
The music of Kodo, the Japanese drum ensemble that opened a three-night stand Thursday at the Wiltern Theatre, is deeply rooted in traditional Japanese culture, but the group was also an international pioneer of all-percussion touring groups. The lasting impression of the impressive 90-minute performance was how much Kodo now seems like the Japanese representative of a world full of related rhythms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992
As a representative of many trail users--hikers, equestrians, bird-watchers, dog-walkers, nature-lovers--I attended the Ventura County Board of Supervisors meeting concerning the Soka property. It seems to most of us that Soka University chose an improper location for its expansion. The Mountains Recreation Conservation Authority has always wanted the location to be the center of its operations when the area becomes a national park. The Times used the word "seize" in an inflammatory manner--as though Soka will be ousted without remuneration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1990 | FRANKI V. RANSOM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1975, Grace Brophy did a favor for friends and gave a San Diego elementary school class a quick lesson in Japanese culture. That favor has since turned into an annual countywide event. Brophy is a member of the San Diego chapter of Ikebana International, a nonprofit cultural organization based in Tokyo that promotes the study of Japanese floral art. Its motto is "Friendship Through Flowers."
TRAVEL
August 18, 1996
Atlanta had the Olympics. Next month, what Japanese officials are calling the largest Japanese cultural festival ever planned in the United States will get under way in Texas. Sept. 4 is the kickoff date for Sun & Star 1996, a 100-day celebration of Japanese culture in Dallas and Fort Worth.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The AFLAC duck is going to Japan this month with a softer quack. In commercials designed for the Japanese market, AFLAC has ditched comedian Gilbert Gottfried's abrasive quacking of the Columbus, Ga.-based insurance company's name. Instead, a Japanese actor portrays the duck with a more soothing tone. "The Japanese culture does not like to be yelled at," AFLAC spokeswoman Laura Kane said. "Gilbert might be a little over the top." Gottfried's voice will remain in U.S.
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