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Japanese Descent

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996
As the president of a local chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, I commend the essay by Robert A. Jones, "Whitewashing Manzanar" (April 10). Comments from groups opposing the restoration of Manzanar as a historic site indicate a mentality that exposing or even stating the truth of what happened during the past is un-American or not patriotic. If no other lesson is learned from history, it should be that hiding the truth accomplishes nothing and only leads to further fears and cover-ups.
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NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Jay Jones, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The Japanese American soldiers who fought valiantly in World War II, even as many of their relatives were held in internment camps, will be remembered in an exhibition at Honolulu's Bishop Museum . “American Heroes: Japanese-American WWII Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal ” will be on display March 9-April 14. At the core of the exhibit, curated by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History , is the actual...
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NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Jay Jones, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
The Japanese American soldiers who fought valiantly in World War II, even as many of their relatives were held in internment camps, will be remembered in an exhibition at Honolulu's Bishop Museum . “American Heroes: Japanese-American WWII Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal ” will be on display March 9-April 14. At the core of the exhibit, curated by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History , is the actual...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
George Aratani, a Los Angeles businessman who donated millions of dollars to Japanese American causes, and with his wife endowed the nation's first academic chair to study the World War II internment of people of Japanese descent and their efforts to gain redress, has died. He was 95. An entrepreneur who founded the Mikasa china and Kenwood electronics firms, Aratani died Tuesday at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center of complications of pneumonia, his daughter Linda Aratani said. He had lived at the Keiro nursing facility in Lincoln Heights since last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Re "The Courts of Ethnic Identity," July 14: I read with disgust of the Community Youth Council's decision to kick a 13-year-old Latino kid off the Montebello Jets Corsairs basketball team because he wasn't of Japanese descent. When I was a kid, my friends and I were all colorblind and race made no difference. Leave it to the adults involved in Japanese American basketball leagues to send a hypocritical message to their impressionable children: It's OK for us to discriminate to preserve cultural identity, but it's not OK for others to discriminate against us!
NEWS
November 8, 1987
Re: J. E. M. Zell's reaction to the internment of Japanese Americans, or as is more descriptive, Americans of Japanese descent. Granted her family's and her own personal experiences were inhumane and unpardonable. However, I fail to see how she feels not paying reparations will somehow punish the Japanese who imprisoned her. She seems to rightly feel that Japan owes her an apology. Well, Japan is not America. Since she is living in America, she must feel that it's a better place to live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1992
The Los Angeles Times ("Half a Century Later, Relocation Pain Persists," Feb. 16, and "Night Visitors Brought Halt to Family's Hopes," Feb. 17) gave good coverage to the wartime experiences of individuals of Japanese descent on the West Coast--mainly Orange County. The U.S. Army, authorized by Executive Order 9066, removed more than 120,000 people, both citizens and non-citizens, from their homes on the West Coast and put them into 10 camps, inside barbed wire enclosures, in seven western states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
George Aratani, a Los Angeles businessman who donated millions of dollars to Japanese American causes, and with his wife endowed the nation's first academic chair to study the World War II internment of people of Japanese descent and their efforts to gain redress, has died. He was 95. An entrepreneur who founded the Mikasa china and Kenwood electronics firms, Aratani died Tuesday at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center of complications of pneumonia, his daughter Linda Aratani said. He had lived at the Keiro nursing facility in Lincoln Heights since last summer.
OPINION
May 27, 2011
In one sense, the U.S. solicitor general's recent admission of his office's wrongdoing wasn't really news. After all, commissions courts and investigators long ago established that various government agencies and officials fudged or withheld facts during World War II in order to sweep all people of Japanese descent — American-born citizens as well as immigrants — out of California and parts of three other Western states. Congress, the president, state and local officials and the military rode a wave of war hysteria to support the politically popular but blatantly un-American evacuation and confinement of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2001
I sympathize with the plight of the younger generation of Japanese Americans who are being thrust into the spotlight as a result of the movie "Pearl Harbor" and their discomfort with being the possible object of ridicule, ostracism or worse (" 'Pearl Harbor' Making Its Marks," by Erika Hayasaki, May 29). I hope and am confident that the vast majority of Americans have overcome their animosity toward the Japanese and realize that the Japanese actions in World War II were of a different time and mind-set.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2011 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Every morning, she climbed the wide marble steps of the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga was not trained for this work. She was a homemaker, not a historian. But she had a lifetime of simmering anger and unanswered questions. By lamplight in the grand reading room, she scoured thousands of documents, inventing her own organizing system to keep track of the information she found. She brought home so many copies that she commandeered a bathtub and used it as a filing cabinet.
OPINION
May 27, 2011
In one sense, the U.S. solicitor general's recent admission of his office's wrongdoing wasn't really news. After all, commissions courts and investigators long ago established that various government agencies and officials fudged or withheld facts during World War II in order to sweep all people of Japanese descent — American-born citizens as well as immigrants — out of California and parts of three other Western states. Congress, the president, state and local officials and the military rode a wave of war hysteria to support the politically popular but blatantly un-American evacuation and confinement of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Togo W. Tanaka, a former journalist and businessman whose reports on life inside the Manzanar internment camp illuminated divisions in the Japanese American community after the attack on Pearl Harbor and the tensions that eventually erupted in riots at the World War II-era detention center, has died. He was 93. Tanaka died of natural causes May 21 at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, according to his daughter, Christine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2002 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixty years later, Aki Yamazaki still wonders about a box of sorority papers and mementos she hid in her parents' attic on 29th Place near Western Avenue and Adams Boulevard. She wonders if the people who live there now might have come across the box. She wonders how they would receive her if she knocked on the door of the old house and explained why she had come.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2001
I sympathize with the plight of the younger generation of Japanese Americans who are being thrust into the spotlight as a result of the movie "Pearl Harbor" and their discomfort with being the possible object of ridicule, ostracism or worse (" 'Pearl Harbor' Making Its Marks," by Erika Hayasaki, May 29). I hope and am confident that the vast majority of Americans have overcome their animosity toward the Japanese and realize that the Japanese actions in World War II were of a different time and mind-set.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2000
Re "The Courts of Ethnic Identity," July 14: I read with disgust of the Community Youth Council's decision to kick a 13-year-old Latino kid off the Montebello Jets Corsairs basketball team because he wasn't of Japanese descent. When I was a kid, my friends and I were all colorblind and race made no difference. Leave it to the adults involved in Japanese American basketball leagues to send a hypocritical message to their impressionable children: It's OK for us to discriminate to preserve cultural identity, but it's not OK for others to discriminate against us!
SPORTS
February 11, 1990 | PAUL McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scenes were getting ugly a couple of weeks ago as the Cal State Dominguez Hills men's basketball team wallowed in its season-long doldrums. After a 1-4 start in the California Collegiate Athletic Assn., the Toros had dropped to 5-13 overall, on a pace to become the first team in the school's history to lose 20 games. "Don't count us out yet," assistant coach Bart Yamachika stoically told a reporter after a crushing four-point loss to 11th-ranked Cal State Bakersfield. "Don't count us out."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty-six years after Alicia Nishimoto and Carmen Mochizuki were forced from their homes in Peru and deported to American internment camps, an apology may finally be nearing from their kidnapper: the U.S. government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1996
As the president of a local chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League, I commend the essay by Robert A. Jones, "Whitewashing Manzanar" (April 10). Comments from groups opposing the restoration of Manzanar as a historic site indicate a mentality that exposing or even stating the truth of what happened during the past is un-American or not patriotic. If no other lesson is learned from history, it should be that hiding the truth accomplishes nothing and only leads to further fears and cover-ups.
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