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BUSINESS
May 23, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Japanese corporations acknowledged Tuesday that they have moved to segregate their American and Japanese staffs by nationality so that American employees report only to other Americans, while Japanese nationals report only to other Japanese officials. The segregation policy at one major company, Nissan Motor, was revealed in internal company documents obtained by The Times.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Japanese corporations acknowledged Tuesday that they have moved to segregate their American and Japanese staffs by nationality so that American employees report only to other Americans, while Japanese nationals report only to other Japanese officials. The segregation policy at one major company, Nissan Motor, was revealed in internal company documents obtained by The Times.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's leading employers association and its largest labor confederation, usually at loggerheads, have united in an unprecedented joint struggle against this country's high consumer prices and high cost of land. In the first round of the effort, the two groups--Nikkeiren, the Japan Federation of Employers' Assns., and Rengo, the Private Sector Trade Union Confederation--announced the results of a joint survey of consumer prices in Tokyo, New York and Frankfurt. The results were not surprising.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's leading employers association and its largest labor confederation, usually at loggerheads, have united in an unprecedented joint struggle against this country's high consumer prices and high cost of land. In the first round of the effort, the two groups--Nikkeiren, the Japan Federation of Employers' Assns., and Rengo, the Private Sector Trade Union Confederation--announced the results of a joint survey of consumer prices in Tokyo, New York and Frankfurt. The results were not surprising.
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | United Press International
Japanese employment remained stable in the 1985 fiscal year, with the jobless rate averaging 2.6%, down 0.1% from 1984, the government reported Thursday. The report said that 1.58 million people were jobless in the year ending March 31, a decrease of about 10,000 from a year ago.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1991 | CATHERINE COLLINS, CATHERINE COLLINS is a Washington writer
Twenty years after enacting the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the law's original sponsors have proposed its first major reform. It would overhaul workplace safety laws, give workers a say in job safety and increase criminal penalties for willful violations that result in death or serious injury. The original, groundbreaking legislation represented a government promise to millions of workers that the country was willing to "assure so far as possible" a safe and healthy workplace.
OPINION
April 16, 1989 | David Williams, David Williams, an editorial writer for the Japan Times, is the author of "Calder, Crisis and Compensation: Public Policy and Political Stability in Japan, 1949-1986" (Princeton University Press)
Japan's political pundits are agreed: The days of Noboru Takeshita's government are numbered. Rocked by almost daily revelations of influence-peddling at the heart of Japan's ruling elite, less than 15% of the Japanese public now supports the Takeshita Cabinet. If the Recruit scandal had not cast a shadow over his most likely successors, the man would surely be out of office already. The Takeshita government is therefore doomed. The struggle to find a successor within the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, the progress of the investigations of the public prosecutor's office and the mass media's uncovering of another spectacular wrong-doing will determine when and how the end comes for Takeshita.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major bribery scandal rocking Japan's medical world is raising new questions about whether this nation has double standards for Japanese and U.S. companies. It also raises questions about whether the Japanese are willing to let foreign firms succeed here--even if they play by Japan's rules. Japanese authorities have arrested five employees of General Electric's medical equipment subsidiary in Japan and temporarily barred the unit from selling to university hospitals.
NEWS
August 17, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh out of a two-year technical school, Miyuki Hirai, 19, is looking for work as a biotechnologist. But as she pounds the pavement during Japan's new employee recruitment season, which began last month, she has been told, flat-out, that in this time of economic retrenchment, "We're taking men but not women." No one has been that blunt with a 22-year-old home economics major at Japan Women's University. But the uncertainty may be worse.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Audrey Quintero, a Berkeley woman just starting a week of training for her new job as a counselor at a temporary help agency, couldn't believe what she was hearing. The point of this business is to make money, Quintero recalled the trainer explaining, no matter what the laws say about discrimination. So if a company calls and says it wants to hire only men, just fill out the "male" section of the job order form under the heading "Appropriate Dress," the trainer told Quintero.
BOOKS
June 13, 1999 | VIRGINIA POSTREL, Virginia Postrel is the editor of Reason magazine and the author of "The Future and Its Enemies: The Growing Conflict Over Creativity, Enterprise, and Progress" (The Free Press)
Francis Fukuyama likes big subjects and bold claims. In 1989, he burst into public consciousness with his provocatively titled National Interest article, "The End of History," later expanded into a book, "The End of History and the Last Man" (1992). His thesis: Liberal, democratic capitalism represents the final stage in the Hegelian evolution of governing regimes, and the fall of the Soviet Union settled the debate.
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