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FOOD
March 14, 2001 | RUSS PARSONS
For all of its apparent simplicity, Japanese cooking is a mystery to most American cooks. While some dishes may look like nothing more than rice and raw fish artfully arranged, as anyone who has tried it at home can attest, there's more to Japanese food than meets the eye. As with anything truly simple, every element demands the utmost care.
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NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller
Common Grains , a Japanese food and culture project founded by writer, artisan soba maker and Japanese food expert Sonoko Sakai, is celebrating the new year with a rice tasting and onigiri-making contest at the Japanese American National Museum 's annual Oshogatsu family festival on Sunday, Jan. 6. Attendees can watch Sakai, along with Naoko Moore of Toiro Kitchen , prepare Japanese rice two ways and learn about the history and tradition...
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
With so many big-deal restaurants opening on the Westside, it's easy to overlook the others. SanSui, for instance, is on the Eastside at 2040 Hillhurst Ave., Los Feliz, (213) 660-3868, and is definitely not big-deal. It is, however, unique. "Our goal," says chef-owner Shinichi Kishi, "is to serve healthy Japanese food in a peaceful room."
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Holiday traffic, gift shopping, partying…. It's a relief to slow down with a good cookbook that reflects an idyllic life on a farm in northern  Japan , where the cooking revolves around food that's grown at home and prepared simply. “ Japanese Farm Food ” by Nancy Singleton Hachishu, who moved from California to Japan and ended up marrying a farmer and living in his ancestral home two hours from Tokyo, is a transporting respite. The book opens with a description of her Japanese farmhouse kitchen, a place of wood posts and beams, filled with her collection of 100-year-old baskets and bowls.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JON NALICK
For good Japanese food and sushi in a cool, relaxing atmosphere, climb upstairs to Kamakura, nestled above a neat cluster of shops on Irvine Avenue in Costa Mesa. After choosing either a seat at the bar, or at the sushi bar staffed with friendly chefs, or at a table, try some of the appetizers. The deep-fried sesame chicken ($3.25) makes for a tasty light meal starter. Other good bets running from $4 to $6.50 include crab and tartar scallops. Dinner prices range from $7.50 to $21.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | Max Jacobson
"I don't believe it," says my wife, Keiko, as she eyes the long line at the front desk of Taiko, a white-hot Irvine restaurant that does not take reservations. "In Japan, even Michael Jackson is not this popular." Keiko, a Tokyo native, has been looking forward to eating at this upscale sushi bar for months; she looks positively downcast when the hostess gives her the bad news: "Table . . . one hour. Sushi bar . . . 40 minutes." "Let's go," she says, pulling at my sleeve.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | HILARY DOLE KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The unassuming restaurant, Aya, was called to my attention by a reliable source--the owners of a Japanese restaurant in Santa Barbara. They make a habit of stopping there for a meal on their way home from Los Angeles. Located in a mini-mall that faces the freeway, Aya is small and cozy, with only three booths, a few tables and a curving sushi bar. With lots of smooth blond wood, pink tabletops, colorful Japanese knickknacks and easy, friendly service, it has quite a pleasant, homey feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2001 | SUE ELLICOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Photographs from the 1920s show Western Avenue south of what is now the San Diego Freeway as little more than a dirt track lined with telegraph poles. These days, it's a busy backbone between the two South Bay cities of Gardena and Torrance, pocked with strip malls, auto body shops, Japanese plant nurseries and industrial parks.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Akiko Yamashita carefully pricked a hole in the paper strip and strung it high on a bamboo shoot adorned with origami cranes and angel fish. A visitor to the Japanese section of the Huntington Gardens in San Marino handed Yamashita another strip with her wish written on it. Nearby, Atsuko Hasegawa explained that in Chinese lore, dreams come true on the seventh day of the seventh month because mythical lovers meet on that day every year.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1987
The big Englewood Cliffs, N.J., food concern said it will sell interests in several Asian grocery products businesses in Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand. The units will be sold for $340 million to Ajinomoto Co., a leading Japanese food enterprise. The businesses will be operated by the two companies in a joint venture.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - The worst of the anti-Japanese protests that have swept China in recent days may be over. The financial fallout for the world's second- and third-biggest economies may be just beginning. Japanese-owned factories, restaurants, mini-marts and clothing retailers across China closed en masse Tuesday as protests continued in nearly 100 cities, sparked by a dispute over control of uninhabited islands near Taiwan. Automakers Nissan, Honda, Toyota and Mazda suspended operations at some plants, as did Sony.
HEALTH
March 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan and Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Japan halted some food shipments Monday as officials from the World Health Organization warned that radioactive milk, spinach and other items posed a greater health threat than radioactive materials in the air. Tainted agricultural products turned up over the weekend, with some exceeding government standards for allowable radiation levels. Here's some information on radiation and food safety: How does food become tainted by radiation? Plants can become poisoned when radioactive material enters the soil and is taken up by root systems.
FOOD
June 18, 2008 | Noelle Carter, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: Ita-Cho restaurant on Beverly Boulevard makes the best buta kakuni [a Japanese pork dish]. My family just loves it. Any possibility of getting the recipe? Cari Masuda Beverly Hills Dear Cari: Here's a variation on the traditional Japanese braised pork dish that won't take days to prepare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2007 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
For years, after he had moved back to the old neighborhood, Roy Yoshioka jogged past a slender little restaurant on 1st Street in Boyle Heights. He couldn't imagine it was still open, the place his uncle and aunt had opened more than half a century ago. The place where he watched his mother make sushi for thousands of bento lunch boxes. Then, a few months ago, an old friend invited him to lunch there -- at the last Japanese restaurant in Boyle Heights.
FOOD
June 27, 2007 | S. Irene Virbila, Times Staff Writer
THE server sets down a porcelain plate and announces, "Potato and cheese croquettes." As I look at the two golf ball-sized croquettes and find myself mesmerized by the bonito flakes on top fluttering like the tentacles of some eccentric sea urchin, he quickly adds, "with fish flakes." Not everybody would necessarily know. The bonito flakes look as if they're about to flutter right off and fly around the room, but when I check, the window isn't open.
FOOD
November 9, 2005 | Linda Burum, Special to The Times
IT'S after midnight on a Saturday night at the izakaya Honda Ya, a Japanese pub in Tustin. When the door swings open, a roar of laughter and conversation blasts out to the waiting crowd. Inside, the room pulses with electric energy. Diners sit elbow to elbow at heavy wooden tables in front of the open kitchen or the smoky yakitori bar in the back, drinking sake or draft Kirin and sharing plate after plate of sakana, the Japanese tapas always served with drinks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2007 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
For years, after he had moved back to the old neighborhood, Roy Yoshioka jogged past a slender little restaurant on 1st Street in Boyle Heights. He couldn't imagine it was still open, the place his uncle and aunt had opened more than half a century ago. The place where he watched his mother make sushi for thousands of bento lunch boxes. Then, a few months ago, an old friend invited him to lunch there -- at the last Japanese restaurant in Boyle Heights.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Caitlin Keller
Common Grains , a Japanese food and culture project founded by writer, artisan soba maker and Japanese food expert Sonoko Sakai, is celebrating the new year with a rice tasting and onigiri-making contest at the Japanese American National Museum 's annual Oshogatsu family festival on Sunday, Jan. 6. Attendees can watch Sakai, along with Naoko Moore of Toiro Kitchen , prepare Japanese rice two ways and learn about the history and tradition...
FOOD
October 29, 2003 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
Japanese and fusion are two cuisines that make me nervous. One is daunting and the other usually a disaster. But the best new book I've cooked from in months dabbles in both -- with dishes such as edamame in mint pesto and shiso with corn -- and nothing is lost in translation. "The Breakaway Japanese Kitchen" (Kodansha, $27) is by Eric Gower, a self-trained San Francisco cook who lived in Japan for 15 years and whose first cookbook was written in Japanese.
MAGAZINE
June 22, 2003 | S. Irene Virbila
At The Hump, a sushi chef with a glossy Elvis-like pompadour filets a silvery Japanese mackerel, slicing the flesh into sashimi that tastes as if it were just plucked from the ocean. Next comes pearly-fleshed snapper decorated with slender rings of serrano pepper and tiny saffron-colored flower petals. Later there's a mackerel fried to a golden crunch, followed by a slew of exceptional sushi-nigiri arranged on a huge ceramic slab splashed with black-and-white glazes.
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