Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapanese Government Officials
IN THE NEWS

Japanese Government Officials

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 2, 1985 | Associated Press
Japan on Tuesday lifted sanctions it imposed on North Korea in November, 1983, to protest a terrorist bombing in Rangoon, Burma, the previous month that killed 17 visiting South Korean officials. Japanese government officials may again travel to North Korea, and North Korean officials may enter Japan. Also lifted were bans on Japanese and North Korean diplomats' making contact in third countries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A Japanese government spokesman apologized for insulting Koreans, the latest in a string of verbal blunders by Japanese leaders over the past few years. Seiroku Kajiyama, Japan's chief government spokesman, had predicted that hostilities between North and South Korea would set off street violence between rival Korean factions in Japan. South Koreans said the comment reinforced a mistaken image of Koreans who live in Japan as thugs and gang members.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one frightening month in 1940, Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara handwrote transit visas day and night, allowing thousands of Polish Jews to flee advancing Nazi soldiers. "He wrote and wrote--sometimes even refusing to take his meals," Yukiko Sugihara, his widow, recalled Tuesday. When the pain in his fingers forced the Japanese consul general in Lithuania to stop momentarily, she massaged his hands and reassured him: "You're doing the right thing; we must help these people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1995 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one frightening month in 1940, Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara handwrote transit visas day and night, allowing thousands of Polish Jews to flee advancing Nazi soldiers. "He wrote and wrote--sometimes even refusing to take his meals," Yukiko Sugihara, his widow, recalled Tuesday. When the pain in his fingers forced the Japanese consul general in Lithuania to stop momentarily, she massaged his hands and reassured him: "You're doing the right thing; we must help these people.
NEWS
August 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A Japanese government spokesman apologized for insulting Koreans, the latest in a string of verbal blunders by Japanese leaders over the past few years. Seiroku Kajiyama, Japan's chief government spokesman, had predicted that hostilities between North and South Korea would set off street violence between rival Korean factions in Japan. South Koreans said the comment reinforced a mistaken image of Koreans who live in Japan as thugs and gang members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1992 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The image is of a lonely Korean woman in her late 60s, working in a back street bar in Shanghai. It could be Manila. Or Taipei. She is quiet. No one asks how she got there, so no one answers. The image and the silence haunt Bok Lim Kim, a La Jolla resident who has for a decade tried to raise awareness of sex crimes committed against Korean and other Asian women during World War II. The euphemism was "comfort girls." In reality, they were sex slaves.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Government to Use Public Funds to Cover Thrift's Deposits: After a day of emergency meetings, Japanese government officials agreed to use public funds to cover the deposits of the troubled Cosmo Credit Union, the Tokyo area's largest thrift, said a senior Tokyo Metropolitan Government official. The use of government money to guarantee all Cosmo's deposits could mark the beginning of a move by Japanese officials to resolve the country's long-running banking crisis.
NEWS
January 27, 1988
Japan, saying that North Korea undoubtedly was behind the November terrorist bombing of a South Korean jetliner that killed all 115 people aboard, imposed sanctions for the "inexcusable act against world peace and order." Under the sanctions, contact between Japanese diplomats and North Korean officials will be severely restricted, and Japanese government officials will not be allowed to visit North Korea.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Japan's trade surplus shrank for the second straight month in July as imports grew on the back of improved consumer spending and export growth slowed. The surplus decreased a seasonally adjusted 14.4% in July from June to $6.28 billion, the Finance Ministry said. That was more than the 5.4% slide forecast by economists in a Bloomberg News survey. Exports rose 1.9% from the previous month while imports increased 6.2%.
NEWS
January 2, 1985 | Associated Press
Japan on Tuesday lifted sanctions it imposed on North Korea in November, 1983, to protest a terrorist bombing in Rangoon, Burma, the previous month that killed 17 visiting South Korean officials. Japanese government officials may again travel to North Korea, and North Korean officials may enter Japan. Also lifted were bans on Japanese and North Korean diplomats' making contact in third countries.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1990
I agree with James Flanigan's "Foreigners Pose No Threat to Hollywood" (Nov. 25), but for different reasons. Quincy Jones is concerned about Japanese ownership as a possible threat to cultural sensitivity, given statements by Japanese government officials about African-Americans and Mexican-Americans. But the greatest threat comes from Hollywood itself. Hollywood has never portrayed minority cultures or interests fairly. Contrary to Flanigan's belief that social pressures will effect Japanese behavior, a 1953 treaty between the United States and Japan allows Japanese companies to hire managers of their own choice, and a 1982 U.S. Supreme Court ruling only constrains foreign companies that incorporate here to be subject to U.S. civil rights laws.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1992 | From Associated Press
American auto workers may not take pride in their products, but they're not lazy, according to an informal survey of auto industry executives. "Many have a poor attitude about work and building quality and are 'spoiled' by strong unions that protect slackers and discourage involvement in problem-solving," said the Ward's Auto World magazine survey of 500 automotive engineers, purchasing and corporate officials.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|