Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapanese History
IN THE NEWS

Japanese History

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Mary Adams Urashima crossed through the chain-link gate and stepped back in time. On this warm afternoon, the field was dry and rutted, a hint of the dump next door wafting through the breeze. The few buildings were tattered and filled with refuse, abused by time and vandals. But Urashima saw a wide-open lawn where the rich soil nourished harvests so bountiful that trains would cart away dozens of boxcars at a time. The ponds where goldfish and lily pads were raised. And over there, closer to the crimson farmhouse, the kitchen garden where a family grew vegetables and herbs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
South Korea chided Japan for “retrograde comments and behaviors” Thursday, days after Japanese government ministers and a host of lawmakers flocked to a politically sensitive war shrine. Japan “turns a blind eye and a deaf ear to excruciating loss and pain that Japan inflicted on neighboring countries through its aggression and colonial rule,” a South Korean vice minister told the Japanese ambassador Thursday, according to South Korea's Foreign Ministry . South Korea, “which intends to build a bright future together with Japan, finds it profoundly regrettable.” South Korean officials summoned the ambassador after scores of lawmakers went Tuesday to the Yasukuni shrine, which honors Japanese war dead.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000
Marius Berthus Jensen, 78, a noted scholar of Japanese history and professor emeritus at Princeton University. Born in Vleuten, the Netherlands, Jensen grew up in Massachusetts and received his undergraduate degree at Princeton, where he majored in European history of the Renaissance and Reformation eras. His Army service as a member of the Allied Occupation Team in Japan helped refocus his interest from Europe to Japan. He earned a master's in history at Harvard in 1948, as well as a doctorate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Mary Adams Urashima crossed through the chain-link gate and stepped back in time. On this warm afternoon, the field was dry and rutted, a hint of the dump next door wafting through the breeze. The few buildings were tattered and filled with refuse, abused by time and vandals. But Urashima saw a wide-open lawn where the rich soil nourished harvests so bountiful that trains would cart away dozens of boxcars at a time. The ponds where goldfish and lily pads were raised. And over there, closer to the crimson farmhouse, the kitchen garden where a family grew vegetables and herbs.
NEWS
December 7, 1991
Robert Arden Wilson, who taught Japanese history at UCLA for 29 years and wrote extensively about the Japanese in the United States, has died. He was 81. Wilson died Nov. 29 at his Los Angeles home of natural causes. Among his articles and books was "East to America: A History of the Japanese in the U.S." published in 1980. Wilson frequently said that documenting and writing the history of Japanese-Americans could help society learn to cope with prejudice against all ethnic groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Sharon L. Sievers, a history professor who helped pioneer women's studies at Cal State Long Beach in the early 1970s and with others later sued the university to preserve the program, has died. She was 71. Sievers, who also was a noted scholar of Japanese history, died April 5 at her Long Beach home after a long illness, said Nancy Quam-Wickham, who followed her as chairwoman of the university's history department. After joining Cal State Long Beach in 1968, Sievers spent her entire 40-year academic career there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2001
Re "Monsters of the Imagination," editorial, Oct. 21: "But on Sept. 11 we saw in disbelief, live on TV, more sudden death than on any other day in American history." What about Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Oh, I forgot. That's Japanese history. Lawrence Berk Ventura
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2009 | Charles Solomon, Solomon's "Tale as Old as Time: The Art and Making of 'Beauty and the Beast' " will be published in February.
The only foreign director to win the Academy Award for best animated feature, Hayao Miyazaki, 68, is the most admired and influential filmmaker working in animation today. His latest film, "Ponyo," opened earlier this month in America in 927 theaters -- a record for a Japanese animated feature. ("Ponyo" was the No. 1 box office hit in Japan in 2008, earning more than 14.9 billion yen -- more than $155 million -- to become the eighth-highest-grossing film in Japanese history.) Miyazaki's work has attracted praise not only from critics, including The Times' Kenneth Turan, but from the artists leading the renaissance in animation: John Lasseter and the other Pixar directors, four-time Oscar winner Nick Park of "Wallace & Gromit" fame, and Frédéric Back, the Oscar-winning creator of "The Man Who Planted Trees."
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mariko Terasaki Miller, leafing through her father's diaries and looking at the pages of Japanese characters was a longtime ritual. Miller and her mother, Gwen Harold Terasaki, could not read the writing, but they were content to study the simple ink sketches of mountain ranges and family photographs and to point out the only Japanese words they knew--their names. Translation was out of the question.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992
Japan's Emperor Akihito is scheduled to begin a visit to China today, the first such in the 2,000-year history of the monarchy. The journey aims at improving relations between two neighbors, but the atmospherics surrounding it threaten to produce an opposite effect. The problem--a persistent one--is, from China's perspective, Japan's refusal to face up to the brutal war it waged and the atrocities it inflicted on the Chinese from 1937 to 1945.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Sharon L. Sievers, a history professor who helped pioneer women's studies at Cal State Long Beach in the early 1970s and with others later sued the university to preserve the program, has died. She was 71. Sievers, who also was a noted scholar of Japanese history, died April 5 at her Long Beach home after a long illness, said Nancy Quam-Wickham, who followed her as chairwoman of the university's history department. After joining Cal State Long Beach in 1968, Sievers spent her entire 40-year academic career there.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2009 | Charles Solomon, Solomon's "Tale as Old as Time: The Art and Making of 'Beauty and the Beast' " will be published in February.
The only foreign director to win the Academy Award for best animated feature, Hayao Miyazaki, 68, is the most admired and influential filmmaker working in animation today. His latest film, "Ponyo," opened earlier this month in America in 927 theaters -- a record for a Japanese animated feature. ("Ponyo" was the No. 1 box office hit in Japan in 2008, earning more than 14.9 billion yen -- more than $155 million -- to become the eighth-highest-grossing film in Japanese history.) Miyazaki's work has attracted praise not only from critics, including The Times' Kenneth Turan, but from the artists leading the renaissance in animation: John Lasseter and the other Pixar directors, four-time Oscar winner Nick Park of "Wallace & Gromit" fame, and Frédéric Back, the Oscar-winning creator of "The Man Who Planted Trees."
WORLD
December 18, 2006 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
The Japanese website for Clint Eastwood's "Letters From Iwo Jima" opens with a pitch to go see a movie about "an island the world must not forget." But it is the Japanese who have always pushed memories of the terrible battle for that Pacific rock to the recesses of the mind. Sixty-one years on, there are signs, at last, of a Japanese desire to resurrect the story of those men dispatched into the maw of a superior enemy force and ordered to die for a lost cause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2002 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
Daisy Uyeda Satoda, who spent her high school years at the Topaz internment camp in Utah, now spends her days rushing to chronicle her experience and that of her classmates before the memories slip away. "We've been losing so many members" of the Topaz High School class of 1945, Uyeda Satoda said. "That's why we want to get things into print." Sixty years have passed since the U.S. government banished 120,000 people of Japanese descent to camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2001
Re "Monsters of the Imagination," editorial, Oct. 21: "But on Sept. 11 we saw in disbelief, live on TV, more sudden death than on any other day in American history." What about Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Oh, I forgot. That's Japanese history. Lawrence Berk Ventura
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000
Marius Berthus Jensen, 78, a noted scholar of Japanese history and professor emeritus at Princeton University. Born in Vleuten, the Netherlands, Jensen grew up in Massachusetts and received his undergraduate degree at Princeton, where he majored in European history of the Renaissance and Reformation eras. His Army service as a member of the Allied Occupation Team in Japan helped refocus his interest from Europe to Japan. He earned a master's in history at Harvard in 1948, as well as a doctorate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1994
I write in reply to Ellen Goodman's column of April 29, "Germany Has No Place at the D-Day Reunion." Of course, we should always remember those who died in Nazi concentration camps and those who died trying to free them. It's important to remember the national denial and the international denial that made the Holocaust possible. Goodman says that the sins of the grandparents should not be visited on the grandchildren. She points out that in 1944 few Germans thought they were getting a welcome liberation from Hitler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992 | SHEILA K. JOHNSON, Sheila K. Johnson is an anthropologist and author of "The Japanese Through American Eyes" (Stanford Press). and
In July, the weekly Shukan Post published an article entitled, "Japanese Corporations Are Dogged by the Stock Manipulations of Jewish Capital." It was not the first and doubtless will not be the last time that anti-Semitism is openly expressed in Tokyo. Yet most Japanese would be surprised to hear themselves called anti-Semitic, particularly since they usually cannot tell a Jewish foreigner from a Gentile.
TRAVEL
February 28, 1999 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A small-group tour of England, May 3 to 13, highlights teatime in the traditional English fashion. Three days in London include tea at the Ritz, a tour of Windsor Castle, a visit to the Braham Tea & Coffee Museum, a pub walk along the Thames and a night at the theater. The City of Flowers, Bath, will be the next stop, with an afternoon tea at a country manor owned by Prince Charles and dinner at a pub.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1997
"A country whose textbooks lie . . . will inevitably collapse." Japan's Supreme Court cited that warning from novelist Ryotaro Shiba in ruling that the Education Ministry was wrong in ordering a textbook author to delete accurate descriptions of atrocities committed by Japanese forces during World War II.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|