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Japanese Internment

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OPINION
February 10, 2005
Teresa Watanabe's excellent article "A Lifelong Lesson in Justice" (Feb. 5) tells the story of white teachers in World War II internment camps for Japanese Americans. I hope more Americans will learn about the terrible injustice that our country perpetuated on persons of Japanese ancestry -- immigrants and U.S. citizens alike -- during World War II. When I attended high school in the L.A. Unified School District in the 1960s, the internment camps were not even mentioned in our history textbooks.
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TRAVEL
April 14, 2013
I feel compelled to respond to Bill Watters' letter of April 7 regarding Japanese internment during World War II. First, he seemed to have missed his history lessons as many of these internees were U.S. citizens. Second, if their "spartan" camps provided "medical and social" needs, it is because the internees had to build them from scratch. Third, upon their return they were not compensated. Most lost their homes (forced to sell before being forced to leave), their businesses, property and farms.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1998 | LISA ADDISON
A discussion titled "The Japanese American Internment: A Historical, Legal and Political Perspective," is scheduled May 9 at UC Irvine. The event is set from 10 a.m. to noon at the Social Science Lecture Hall, Room 100. The moderator of the event, sponsored by the Orange County Japanese American Lawyers Assn., will be Kirk H. Nakamura, president of the organization. Featured panelists will include Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito, U.S.
TRAVEL
March 31, 2013 | By Diana Lambdin Meyer
CODY, Wyo. - The drive east of Cody is through high desert, and the February weekend of my visit was bitterly cold. But I was wearing a heavy down coat, snow pants and boots, and riding in a cozy, warm SUV. That's not how nearly 14,000 earlier visitors had arrived in Cody. They came by train from California in late August, and they weren't wearing down or fleece, nor did they have a comfy hotel room awaiting them. They were among the 100,000 Japanese Americans relocated from the West Coast to the interior of the U.S. at the beginning of World War II, shortly after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Anne Marie Welsh, Special to the Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Like "The Scottsboro Boys" and "Parade" before it, "Allegiance - A New American Musical," about the internment of Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor, attempts to confront a shameful episode in American history and rewrite it as musical theater. Now in its world premiere at the Old Globe, "Allegiance" takes a different route from those dark, sardonic and largely successful shows about bigotry and racial hysteria. "Allegiance" presents a surprisingly mild story of family fractures, not an indictment of American failures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1992 | DAVID REYES
The film "Days of Waiting," on the internment of people of Japanese ancestry during World War II, will be shown during a talk at Rancho Santiago College today from noon to 1:30 p.m. In "Days of Waiting," Steven Okazaki presents a biography of Estelle Peck Ishigo, whose refusal to be separated from her Asian husband made her one of the few Caucasians interned with the Japanese-Americans at Heart Mountain, Wyo., during the war. The film won an Academy Award in 1991 for short documentary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reopening a debate that earned him widespread scorn among his legislative colleagues last year, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) has introduced a resolution that states "it is simply untrue that Japanese-Americans were interned in concentration camps during World War II."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1994
1882--the Chinese Exclusion Act. 1924--the Oriental Exclusion Act. 1930s--Police confront "Dust Bowl refugees" at the state border to prevent their entry. 1942--Executive Order 9066 resulting in the Japanese internment. 1994--Proposition 187. How embarrassing. JOHN R. PULSKAMP Granada Hills
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Igniting acrimonious debate, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) on Thursday attacked a resolution calling for California schoolchildren to be taught that the Japanese internment during World War II was a violation of human rights, not an act of military necessity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992
Feb. 19, 1992: Fifty years ago today, the U.S. government announced it would herd Japanese-Americans into internment camps. A few weeks later in Sacramento, I was a carefree 11-year-old strawberry picker plucking free berries from a vacated truck farm. The berries were free because the farm's owners, who had worked long days cultivating the crop, had been removed. Their house and furniture, seen through the windows, looked as normal as though they had left suddenly after breakfast.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Anne Marie Welsh, Special to the Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - Like "The Scottsboro Boys" and "Parade" before it, "Allegiance - A New American Musical," about the internment of Japanese Americans after Pearl Harbor, attempts to confront a shameful episode in American history and rewrite it as musical theater. Now in its world premiere at the Old Globe, "Allegiance" takes a different route from those dark, sardonic and largely successful shows about bigotry and racial hysteria. "Allegiance" presents a surprisingly mild story of family fractures, not an indictment of American failures.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Chris Barton
The story of the internment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II hasn't always gotten widespread attention in the United States. But with construction beginning on the new Topaz Museum and Education Center in Utah, another step is being taken to keep the memory alive. In a groundbreaking ceremony on Sunday that featured Taiko drumming and a book signing by former Japanese internment camp resident turned Disney animator Willie Ito, the museum began work on a location some 16 miles away from the original Topaz camp.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
When they first came to this corner of Wyoming 69 years ago, shops and restaurants in the tiny town of Cody hung banners warning "No Japs Allowed. " A local newspaper announced their arrival with the headline, "TEN THOUSAND JAPS TO BE INTERNED HERE. " But this weekend, as hundreds of Japanese Americans interned during World War II at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center returned, many for the first time, new signs greeted them: "Welcome all Japanese Americans. Congratulations. " Photos: Heart Mountain reunion They returned to see the land, now fields of lima beans and alfalfa, and to see the opening of a long-awaited museum at the site that will preserve their stories.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2011 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Acting Solicitor Gen. Neal Katyal, in an extraordinary admission of misconduct, took to task one of his predecessors for hiding evidence and deceiving the Supreme Court in two of the major cases in its history: the World War II rulings that upheld the detention of more than 110,000 Japanese Americans. Katyal said Tuesday that Charles Fahy, an appointee of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, deliberately hid from the court a report from the Office of Naval Intelligence that concluded the Japanese Americans on the West Coast did not pose a military threat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
When the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor hurled the United States into World War II on Dec. 7, 1941, the impact on William Hohri, then a sophomore at North Hollywood High School, was almost immediate. That afternoon his immigrant father, a Methodist minister, was arrested by the FBI and sent to an alien detention center at Fort Missoula, Mont. Four months later, with only a week's notice, Hohri, his mother and siblings were bused to Manzanar, a prison camp for Japanese Americans at the eastern base of the Sierra Nevada.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
THESE long-ago games don't show up in baseball's official records. They are preserved in the memories of men and women who are very old now, and in the speckled black-and-white photos that survive from that time: shots of sheepish young men showing off their batting stance or a boy caressing a favorite bat, of crowds squeezing around the crude infields for a better view of the game, of a lanky kid kicking up dust as he slides hard into home. Americana, 1940s vintage.
OPINION
January 13, 1991
The Times reports (Jan. 8) that FBI agents are currently interviewing Arab-American businessmen in the U.S. in light of the threats of terrorism worldwide from Iraq. The FBI states that these interviews are intended to protect the Arab-American businessmen from retaliation should the U.S. and Iraq go to war as well as to head off any possible internal Arab terrorist activities. This behavior on the part of our FBI is outrageous and must be condemned for what it is--a retreat to paranoia a la the Japanese internment of World War II. Didn't we just award millions to Japanese-Americans in reparation for that debacle?
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, Times Staff Writer
Igniting an acrimonious debate, Assemblyman Gil Ferguson (R-Newport Beach) on Thursday attacked a resolution calling for California schoolchildren to be taught that the Japanese internment during World War II was a violation of human rights, not an act of military necessity.
BOOKS
December 24, 2006 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
DOROTHEA LANGE worked for the U.S. government. Her famous photographs of migrant workers and sharecroppers, shot in the early 1930s, were commissioned by the Farm Security Administration. In February 1942, not long after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the detention of Japanese Americans in internment camps. The following month, the War Relocation Authority hired Lange to photograph the process.
HOME & GARDEN
June 22, 2006 | Bettijane Levine
These sculptures, carvings and paintings are extraordinary celebrations of humanity and nature. Without knowing where they were done, and under what circumstances, they command attention and exaltation.
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