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REAL ESTATE
May 14, 1989
Author Catherine Collins (Speaking Out, May 7) is unquestionably an expert on Japanese investment in the U.S. Nonetheless, it's my uncomfortable feeling that her thesis regarding the potential danger in Japanese ownership of U.S. real estate has the horse behind the cart. The U.S. doesn't "monitor foreign investments in some manner" nor stringently control same, because prior to the time of runaway trade deficits, we were economically strong enough not to worry. Unlike Mexico, which prohibits its foreign ownership of coastal property--one of its few assets--we had great production and technology strengths.
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BUSINESS
December 26, 2009 | By Yuriko Nagano
At a time when major biotech companies in California are eager for investors, Japanese pharmaceutical companies are increasingly becoming a go-to place for money to develop and sell new drugs. Japan's largest drug maker teamed up with Amylin Pharmaceuticals Inc. in San Diego last month to develop and sell an obesity drug that the companies think could eventually be worth $1 billion. In October, Japan's second-largest drug firm announced a $110-million payment to Medivation Inc. of San Francisco to develop and market a potential prostate cancer drug together in a deal that they hope could reach $655 million.
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BUSINESS
October 29, 1989
I was particularly pleased to see James Flanigan's column on Oct. 11 ("U.S.-Bashing Book by Sony's Chief Costs Him Credibility"). We are continuously besieged with misinformation and disinformation from Japanese lobbyists and paid supporters telling us that the dismantling of our economy is great. We are also told that we make too much of our concern of Japanese investment. Perhaps the most important person is Akio Morita, who has played a game with America and disguised his true feelings until now. His U.S.-bashing is typical of the Japanese strategy.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2000 | Karen Kaplan
Idealab received an investment last month that values the Pasadena Internet business incubator at $7.46 billion. Hikari Tsushin, a Tokyo-based telecommunications firm, paid $100 million for a 1.34% stake in Idealab to "pursue financial and strategic opportunities," according to a notice released by the firm. The investment has already begun to pay off: Hikari Tsushin is preparing to launch a joint venture with an Idealab firm, Intranets.com of Woburn, Mass. The venture, Intranets Inc.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2000 | Karen Kaplan
Idealab received an investment last month that values the Pasadena Internet business incubator at $7.46 billion. Hikari Tsushin, a Tokyo-based telecommunications firm, paid $100 million for a 1.34% stake in Idealab to "pursue financial and strategic opportunities," according to a notice released by the firm. The investment has already begun to pay off: Hikari Tsushin is preparing to launch a joint venture with an Idealab firm, Intranets.com of Woburn, Mass. The venture, Intranets Inc.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1990
Your article, "Japan's Money Troubles Begin to Jolt U.S. Economy" (Oct. 18), noted that "Japanese money has supported everything from the U.S. budget deficit to expansion of the urban skylines." In spite of this, one hears strong criticism of the Japanese and their financial activity in the United States. I am not pro-Japanese, but I feel the criticism of Japan is biased. No criticism is heard about the British who have been quietly making the largest direct investments in the United States.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1989 | Associated Press
Americans are not as worried about Japanese investment in the United States as is commonly supposed, a U.S.-Japan friendship organization said Wednesday in releasing a poll. About 44% of Americans in three states where Japanese direct investment is most heavily concentrated--California, Michigan and Tennessee--agreed with the proposition that Japanese direct investment is good for the U.S. economy. Seventeen percent disagreed, and 39% said they were neutral.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1990 | From Reuter s
Nearly half of Americans see Japanese investments in their country as a bad thing for the United States, according to a Japanese government opinion survey released today. Asked if Japanese investments were good or bad for their nation overall, 44% of the 1,994 respondents aged 18 or over said "bad thing" while 27% said "good thing," the Foreign Ministry said.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1988 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
When the Japanese come to town in the Midwest to announce the opening of an auto plant, they are typically met by a frenzied celebration. But in Indiana, they have been met instead by political controversy, seemingly built upon latent American fears of a Japanese invasion of the nation's industrial heartland.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2000 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ingram Micro Inc. in Santa Ana, the world's largest computer products distributor, said Monday it has invested in a start-up company designed to act as a business-to-business Internet marketplace. The new enterprise, Viacore Inc., will use a universal digital language created by RosettaNet, a consortium of technology-industry leaders, to process sales more cost-efficiently, Ingram Chief Executive Jerre Stead said.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financial crisis in Indonesia is being watched nervously in Japan, whose massive investment in the crisis-wracked Southeast Asian country has closely intertwined the two economies. With $21 billion in Japanese investment, Indonesia ranks first among Asian countries as a target for Japan's foreign direct investment--ahead even of China, with its far greater population and rapid growth rates, according to Japanese Finance Ministry statistics.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think of the heart of England, that welcoming neighborhood pub: British tradition at its homiest, a refuge of good conversation about life and the daily double washed down with pints of beer. Now take a sip and think of globalization: the cross-border, cross-cultural whirl of century-end ideas and capital. Is a Japanese investment bank becoming the largest owner of pubs and the No. 2 owner of bookmaking joints in Britain? Bet on it.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1997 | TOM PETRUNO
What would a deflationary world look like? Perhaps like Japan for the last seven years. When that country's "bubble" economy burst in 1990 with the global recession triggered by the Persian Gulf War, Japanese stock and real estate prices collapsed. Seven years later those assets still are depressed, and the Japanese banking system, weighed down with bad loans, remains in awful shape. Japan's economy registered almost no growth from 1992 through '94, as consumer spending dried up.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL
The giant Japanese traders and manufacturers established operations in Southern California in the late 1970s and early '80s and have been refining and expanding them ever since. Now Orange County may be seeing a new wave of investment from Japan. In recent months, we've had a major noodle maker, a big printing firm and a tofu maker build or enlarge factories in the county, and next month a mid-sized Japanese injection molding company will open its first U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Beautiful Club, a dimly lighted basement karaoke bar here, silk-gowned Chinese hostesses wait on Japanese businessmen who have some yen for company. In the penthouse restaurant of the Senmao Building, an imposing new marble-and-glass skyscraper constructed by Mori Building Co. of Tokyo, Japanese diners linger over elegant courses of yellowtail sushi and sea urchins.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996
Engage Games Online, spun off by Interplay Productions two months ago, said Wednesday that Softbank Holdings Inc. has bought 20% of the company for an undisclosed price. Softbank, Japan's largest distributor of computer software and peripherals, will get a seat on Engage's board of directors. Other terms weren't disclosed. Engage expects to launch an extensive interactive game site later this year on the Internet and through online services.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The dollar soared Wednesday against the Japanese yen after Japan's Finance Ministry announced a surprise set of measures to encourage Japanese investment overseas. The Tokyo announcement was followed by large dollar purchases by the Bank of Japan and then by the U.S. Federal Reserve when trading opened in New York. The result: By the end of the day, the dollar had jumped to 90.95 yen in New York, up 3.3% from 88.05 on Tuesday, and hit its highest level since March 14.
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