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REAL ESTATE
June 28, 1987 | BUSTER SUSSMAN, Sussman is a Times real estate writer
What will Japanese real estate investors do next? One thing they may not do is take capitalization rates as low as some local sellers would like. A capitalization rate is a measure of a property's overall return to an investor calculated by dividing the annual net operating income by the purchase price. "Japanese investors are getting more selective, they're looking for more than a 7.
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WORLD
May 25, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Looking back, Japanese businessman Tomatsu Ito says, he might as well have moved to Mars rather than a few hours' flight away to China. Unlike in his publicly polite homeland, drivers in Dalian were chaotic, often careening through crowded crosswalks. Worse, he couldn't muster even the most basic Chinese. Often desperate, he would phone JianHua Yang, his second in charge at the branch office of an Osaka, Japan-based software company. Yang is a Dalian native who, like many here, speaks Japanese.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Honolulu Mayor Frank F. Fasi is known as a maverick politician who is not afraid to stoke the fires of controversy. And this week he has lived up to his reputation. In an effort to stem a wild home-buying spree by Japanese investors in the city's luxury neighborhoods in recent months, Fasi sent a bill to the state Legislature seeking to prevent foreign investors from buying residential property throughout Hawaii.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2008 | Victoria Kim, Kim is a Times staff writer
In retrospect, Drew Gordon says, he should have been more wary of the well-dressed man at the Beverly Hills BMW dealership with a deep voice, suave ways and a business offer that seemed too good to be true. But he appeared to be both well-to-do and well-connected, buying a pair of pricey luxury cars on the spot and introducing himself as Alfredo Trujillo Fox, the brother of former Mexican President Vicente Fox, Gordon recalled. "I have a perfect business for you," Gordon said Trujillo told him.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1987 | Associated Press
A more stable dollar and improved market conditions have helped lure Japanese investors away from Tokyo and back to Wall Street, although the extent of their interest isn't known yet, financial experts say. "They're definitely bullish," said Maria F. Ramirez, a managing parter for Drexel Burnham Lambert who recently returned from a business trip to Japan. "They were paring their European investments and buying (U.S.) Treasuries." "We're seeing them nibbling.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1987 | From Reuters
Big Japanese investors here say that Washington has not done enough to reduce the federal budget deficit and that Friday's agreement in Washington won't bring them back to Wall Street in force. "I have no intention to start buying, as the stock market is forecast to decline further technically," said Nobuhiko Higo, fund manager at Sumitomo Life Insurance Co. in New York. Japanese investors have taken to the sidelines since Wall Street suffered its record crash on Oct.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1989 | CHARLES STROUSE, Times Staff Writer
Increasingly sophisticated Japanese real estate investors are leaving the office behind and heading for retail and residential markets in Orange County, according to a report released Thursday by Coldwell Banker. Since last September, Japanese buyers have handed over almost $100 million for retail and apartment buildings in the county. And the figure is expected to keep rising, said Joe Leon, a Japanese investment specialist with Coldwell Banker, a major real estate brokerage. For other real estate investors in Orange County, the result could be more competition for available properties.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Frank F. Fasi, Honolulu's feisty mayor, has jumped into the fray over the sale of a popular Roman Catholic church to Japanese investors who intend to demolish the building and put up a luxury condominium tower. The ruckus was kicked off when the bishop of Honolulu decided to sell St. Augustine Catholic Church, which is just across the street from Waikiki Beach, for $45 million, despite the opposition of parishioners.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hajime Omura is one of many Japanese savers who have endured endless frustration since the beginning of this decade. Omura, 49, has assets socked away in real estate, stocks, bonds, bank savings and a postal savings account. But since 1990, property values have plunged, stocks have fallen by more than 50%, and interest rates have dropped so low that multiyear time deposits in the postal savings system--the single most popular form of savings in Japan--pay less than 1% annual interest.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At MCA Inc.--the entertainment giant whose movies, records and theme parks help shape American popular culture--about 60 employees recently filed into a screening room for a talk on "group think," the history of sushi and the role of consensus-building in Japanese management. The wide-ranging discussion of Japanese business and culture ended with the MCA employees rising from their padded chairs and awkwardly bowing to one another.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2006 | From Reuters
Japan's best-known shareholder activist, fund manager Yoshiaki Murakami, said today that he expected to be charged with insider trading and would resign immediately from his fund. Murakami said that after discussions with prosecutors he had decided that his actions in connection with a high-profile takeover battle last year initiated by Livedoor Co., a scandal-hit Internet firm, could be interpreted as having violated securities trading laws.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
When Takao Uchida's plan to launch his own business fell through three years ago, he knew right away how to use his 2.5 million yen ($21,550) in savings. He bought stocks. Uchida has doubled his money since then. The 29-year-old recently quit a job as a computer engineer to become a full-time day trader and now heads a company to provide support for hundreds of others like him. "Sometimes I get so carried away, I end up skipping lunch.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Action on Wall Street slowed sharply Monday as investors awaited Federal Reserve policymakers' meeting today. In commodities trading crude oil futures rose above $25 a barrel. In currency markets the dollar resurged against the yen after recent weakness. The Dow Jones industrials ended down 29.48 points, or 0.3%, at 10,577.75. The Nasdaq composite inched up 8.76 points, or 0.5%, to 1,877.06. Winners topped losers by 18 to 14 on the New York Stock Exchange and by 19 to 16 on Nasdaq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2002 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State officials and private business groups stepped up efforts Thursday to help nearly 600 Northern California families being uprooted from their rental homes by the Japanese billionaire who owns the properties. The California Assn. of Mortgage Brokers announced that its members will waive home sale fees and commissions to any of the displaced tenants who seek to buy homes. Meanwhile, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) joined the chorus of politicians--including Gov.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Republic New York Corp., a subsidiary of HSBC Holdings, pleaded guilty to helping financier Martin Armstrong swindle Japanese investors and will pay them $606 million, the largest corporate criminal restitution ever ordered by a U.S. court. The charges against the unit of Britain's No. 1 banking company stem from Republic's involvement with Armstrong and his company, Princeton Economics International Inc.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TOKYO Japanese consumers, long dismissed as an illogical breed that eschews risk and enjoys paying higher prices, are showing they will act as rationally as their counterparts anywhere else if given half a chance. On Oct. 1, Japan ended its high fixed commissions on retail stock trading under its "Big Bang" deregulation policy--replicating a move the United States made in 1975. Overnight, commissions dropped by as much as 90%.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1990 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Japanese come calling in Hollywood, one of their first stops is usually talent agent Michael Ovitz's sleek new I. M. Pei building in the heart of Beverly Hills, attorney Peter Dekom's elegant wood-paneled office high above Sunset Boulevard, or Jake Eberts' table at the Polo Lounge in the Beverly Hills Hotel, where the London-based producer frequently resides.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The Dow Jones industrial average tumbled 61.94 points Tuesday, a reaction in part to the Japanese stock market's spectacular--and unabated--plunge. As the Tokyo market opened today, unnerved traders there used the Dow's drop as another excuse to sell--raising worries that New York and Tokyo now are locked in a downward spiral. The Nikkei stock average plunged 602.27 points, or 3.4%, to end the morning session today at 17,189.28. That followed a 644.82-point loss Tuesday.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1998 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
American investors are jockeying to scoop up prestigious resorts in Hawaii at bargain-basement prices as banks pressure their debt-ridden Japanese owners to sell them. "The bank reforms that went into effect in Japan in April have really forced the issue," said Joseph Toy, director of real estate and hospitality consulting for Coopers & Lybrand in Honolulu. "There's long been talk about the [Japanese] Ministry of Finance being more adamant about divestiture of these troubled loans.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hajime Omura is one of many Japanese savers who have endured endless frustration since the beginning of this decade. Omura, 49, has assets socked away in real estate, stocks, bonds, bank savings and a postal savings account. But since 1990, property values have plunged, stocks have fallen by more than 50%, and interest rates have dropped so low that multiyear time deposits in the postal savings system--the single most popular form of savings in Japan--pay less than 1% annual interest.
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