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Japanese Iraq

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NEWS
September 3, 1990 | Reuters
The first group of Japanese freed by Iraq arrived back in Tokyo on Sunday night aboard a government-chartered flight. The Japan Air Lines jet carrying 68 women and children and one sick man released by Baghdad landed at Tokyo's Narita International Airport. The Japanese refugees arrived to an emotional reunion with relatives who began gathering at the airport in the afternoon, hours before the flight was due to arrive.
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NEWS
November 16, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government said Thursday that it will send supplies worth $60 million to the multinational force in the Persian Gulf, but it added that Japanese companies are distinctly cool to the project. At a press conference, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry said no Japanese company involved in the effort wants to be named. Some companies refused to contract as suppliers at all, said Eiichi Hasegawa, director for North American Trade Policy Planning.
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NEWS
November 7, 1990 | KIM MURPHY and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on Tuesday ordered the release of 108 foreign hostages, including 77 Japanese nationals, in an apparent response to appeals from visiting delegations seeking to chip away at Baghdad's "human shield" against military attack.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | KIM MURPHY and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on Tuesday ordered the release of 108 foreign hostages, including 77 Japanese nationals, in an apparent response to appeals from visiting delegations seeking to chip away at Baghdad's "human shield" against military attack.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture of solidarity with the United States and other Western allies, Japan on Thursday rebuffed an Iraqi offer to allow detained Japanese nationals to go free if the Tokyo government would withhold its support of economic sanctions against Iraq. But it is not clear how much further Japan is prepared to go in participating directly in the multinational effort in the Persian Gulf region, especially in terms of military activity. Adding to the pressure on Tokyo to expand its role, U.S.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government said Thursday that it will send supplies worth $60 million to the multinational force in the Persian Gulf, but it added that Japanese companies are distinctly cool to the project. At a press conference, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry said no Japanese company involved in the effort wants to be named. Some companies refused to contract as suppliers at all, said Eiichi Hasegawa, director for North American Trade Policy Planning.
WORLD
April 30, 2004 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Waving rainbow-striped flags for peace, people from across the country marched to the front steps of the Vatican on Thursday to show solidarity with three Italian men taken hostage in Iraq -- just days after the Iraqi captors ordered that they do so. In a video shown Monday on Arabic-language satellite television, the abductors demanded that Italians rise up in protest against their government's decision to maintain troops in Iraq.
OPINION
October 17, 2002 | Chalmers Johnson, Chalmers Johnson is president of the Japan Policy Research Institute. His latest book is "Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire" (Owl Books, 2001).
According to press reports, the White House is developing a plan, modeled on the postwar occupation of Japan, to install an American-led military government in Iraq. Administration officials said Iraq would be governed by a senior American military officer, who would assume the role that Gen. Douglas MacArthur played in Japan after its surrender. The plan calls for war-crimes trials of Iraqi leaders and a transition to an elected civilian government after a few years of American occupation.
NEWS
September 3, 1990 | Reuters
The first group of Japanese freed by Iraq arrived back in Tokyo on Sunday night aboard a government-chartered flight. The Japan Air Lines jet carrying 68 women and children and one sick man released by Baghdad landed at Tokyo's Narita International Airport. The Japanese refugees arrived to an emotional reunion with relatives who began gathering at the airport in the afternoon, hours before the flight was due to arrive.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture of solidarity with the United States and other Western allies, Japan on Thursday rebuffed an Iraqi offer to allow detained Japanese nationals to go free if the Tokyo government would withhold its support of economic sanctions against Iraq. But it is not clear how much further Japan is prepared to go in participating directly in the multinational effort in the Persian Gulf region, especially in terms of military activity. Adding to the pressure on Tokyo to expand its role, U.S.
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