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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday issued an official apology and the federal government pledged payments of $5,000 to each of the more than 2,200 people of Japanese ancestry who were taken from their Latin American homes during World War II and imprisoned in U.S. internment camps. The statement and the promised compensation are designed to close a disturbing, if little known, chapter in the nation's history. As anti-Japanese fervor mounted during the war, U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty-six years after Art Shibayama and his family were forcibly brought to the United States from Peru and placed in a Texas internment camp, he vows to continue his battle to right the wrong committed by the U.S. government against hundreds like him. "I am very tired," said Shibayama, 69, Monday at a news conference at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo, "but I have no choice but to continue." Shibayama and members of two other Japanese American families were on hand as Rep.
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NEWS
August 26, 1996 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The police came to take the family away--a husband and wife and four children, each allowed to pack one suitcase. The family land, including a cotton plantation, was lost forever. Placed on a ship, guarded by soldiers with machine guns, they sailed across an ocean to an internment camp. The camp was in Crystal City, Texas. And the soldiers with the doughboy helmets who took Alicia Nishimoto and her family from Peru were members of the U.S. Army. It is a little-known, dark chapter in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday issued an official apology and the federal government pledged payments of $5,000 to each of the more than 2,200 people of Japanese ancestry who were taken from their Latin American homes during World War II and imprisoned in U.S. internment camps. The statement and the promised compensation are designed to close a disturbing, if little known, chapter in the nation's history. As anti-Japanese fervor mounted during the war, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty-six years after Art Shibayama and his family were forcibly brought to the United States from Peru and placed in a Texas internment camp, he vows to continue his battle to right the wrong committed by the U.S. government against hundreds like him. "I am very tired," said Shibayama, 69, Monday at a news conference at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo, "but I have no choice but to continue." Shibayama and members of two other Japanese American families were on hand as Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1996 | MAKI BECKER
Activists fighting for redress for Peruvians of Japanese descent who were deported from Latin America and forced into U.S. prison camps during World War II announced Wednesday the launch of a campaign to put pressure on the government to make a formal apology and offer reparations. The "Campaign for Justice" was announced by Robin Toma, a civil rights attorney representing three Japanese Peruvians in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty-six years after Alicia Nishimoto and Carmen Mochizuki were forced from their homes in Peru and deported to American internment camps, an apology may finally be nearing from their kidnapper: the U.S. government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are certain childhood memories that still haunt Phil Shigekuni, like the time his mother and grandparents were forced to sell nearly everything they owned in their Los Angeles home, and when he was awakened at night by the sound of people urinating into pails at the Santa Anita racetrack. For the North Hills resident, both are vivid reminders of the U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | EUN-KYUNG KIM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
During World War II, Alice Nishimoto and her family were forced from their home in Peru and herded into an American internment camp with thousands of other Japanese. After the war, no one wanted them. In Japan, they were considered American traitors. In the United States, they were illegal immigrants. Peru turned them away. Half a century later, they feel that the U.S. government owes them--and about 300 other Japanese from Latin America--an apology and $20,000.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, Peter Y. Hong is a Times staff writer. and
Angelita Low, 27, speaks English to her friends, Spanish at work and Chinese at home. That's life when you're a Chinese American teacher of bilingual classes from a Nicaraguan town called Bonanza. Her tri-cultural balancing act is an increasingly common experience in Los Angeles, which provides a window on an overlooked dimension of history: The Latin American nations that send immigrants to Los Angeles are ethnically diverse societies that have drawn immigrants from throughout the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty-six years after Alicia Nishimoto and Carmen Mochizuki were forced from their homes in Peru and deported to American internment camps, an apology may finally be nearing from their kidnapper: the U.S. government.
NEWS
September 21, 1997 | EUN-KYUNG KIM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
During World War II, Alice Nishimoto and her family were forced from their home in Peru and herded into an American internment camp with thousands of other Japanese. After the war, no one wanted them. In Japan, they were considered American traitors. In the United States, they were illegal immigrants. Peru turned them away. Half a century later, they feel that the U.S. government owes them--and about 300 other Japanese from Latin America--an apology and $20,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are certain childhood memories that still haunt Phil Shigekuni, like the time his mother and grandparents were forced to sell nearly everything they owned in their Los Angeles home, and when he was awakened at night by the sound of people urinating into pails at the Santa Anita racetrack. For the North Hills resident, both are vivid reminders of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1996 | MAKI BECKER
Activists fighting for redress for Peruvians of Japanese descent who were deported from Latin America and forced into U.S. prison camps during World War II announced Wednesday the launch of a campaign to put pressure on the government to make a formal apology and offer reparations. The "Campaign for Justice" was announced by Robin Toma, a civil rights attorney representing three Japanese Peruvians in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in federal court.
NEWS
August 26, 1996 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The police came to take the family away--a husband and wife and four children, each allowed to pack one suitcase. The family land, including a cotton plantation, was lost forever. Placed on a ship, guarded by soldiers with machine guns, they sailed across an ocean to an internment camp. The camp was in Crystal City, Texas. And the soldiers with the doughboy helmets who took Alicia Nishimoto and her family from Peru were members of the U.S. Army. It is a little-known, dark chapter in U.S.
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