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Japanese Latin Americans

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty-six years after Alicia Nishimoto and Carmen Mochizuki were forced from their homes in Peru and deported to American internment camps, an apology may finally be nearing from their kidnapper: the U.S. government.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001 | MICHELLE KOIDIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
His brow creased, Art Shibayama gazes across a wide green field strewn with slabs of concrete. The barracks that housed families like his are gone. So are the barbed wire and the armed guards. Still, a recent visit to this chunk of flat South Texas land stirs painful memories more than 50 years old.
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NEWS
December 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of Japanese Latin Americans, offered $5,000 and an apology for being abducted to the United States during World War II, lost Tuesday in a lawsuit that sought to make sure the government had enough money to pay them. U.S. District Judge Charles Legge dismissed the suit, which accused the Treasury Department of losing $200 million by failing to invest a $1.65-billion fund created by Congress to pay reparations to Japanese Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty-six years after Art Shibayama and his family were forcibly brought to the United States from Peru and placed in a Texas internment camp, he vows to continue his battle to right the wrong committed by the U.S. government against hundreds like him. "I am very tired," said Shibayama, 69, Monday at a news conference at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo, "but I have no choice but to continue." Shibayama and members of two other Japanese American families were on hand as Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are certain childhood memories that still haunt Phil Shigekuni, like the time his mother and grandparents were forced to sell nearly everything they owned in their Los Angeles home, and when he was awakened at night by the sound of people urinating into pails at the Santa Anita racetrack. For the North Hills resident, both are vivid reminders of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to settle unfinished business, a delegation of Japanese Americans left for Washington, D.C., on Tuesday to lobby Congress for redress for Latin Americans of Japanese descent who were detained and forced into U.S. prison camps during World War II. The delegation also plans to lobby on behalf of Japanese American railroad and mine workers who, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, were abruptly fired from jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For human rights activist Grace Shimizu, it was the 1990 reunion of Peruvian Japanese internees in San Francisco that sparked what has become an eight-year "labor of love" to win justice for them. Her passion has turned a good portion of her El Cerritos home, which she shares with her aging parents, into an office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2000 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty-six years after Art Shibayama and his family were forcibly brought to the United States from Peru and placed in a Texas internment camp, he vows to continue his battle to right the wrong committed by the U.S. government against hundreds like him. "I am very tired," said Shibayama, 69, Monday at a news conference at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo, "but I have no choice but to continue." Shibayama and members of two other Japanese American families were on hand as Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1997 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With only a year left before the federal government stops reparations to Japanese Americans who suffered internment and other discrimination during World War II, several civil rights groups Monday complained that about 3,300 people are being unfairly denied redress. Roughly 80,000 individuals have received written apologies and cash payments of $20,000 apiece since the reparations program began nine years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000 | BRENDAN RILEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Art Shibayama was just 13 when he and other family members were forced from their home in Peru in 1944 and put on a ship for a three-week voyage to the United States --and an internment camp in Texas. The Shibayamas and tens of thousands like them who lost their freedom and property were "guilty" only of being of Japanese ancestry and of living in the Americas at a time when the United States was at war with Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000 | BRENDAN RILEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Art Shibayama was just 13 when he and other family members were forced from their home in Peru in 1944 and put on a ship for a three-week voyage to the United States --and an internment camp in Texas. The Shibayamas and tens of thousands like them who lost their freedom and property were "guilty" only of being of Japanese ancestry and of living in the Americas at a time when the United States was at war with Japan.
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of Japanese Latin Americans, offered $5,000 and an apology for being abducted to the United States during World War II, lost Tuesday in a lawsuit that sought to make sure the government had enough money to pay them. U.S. District Judge Charles Legge dismissed the suit, which accused the Treasury Department of losing $200 million by failing to invest a $1.65-billion fund created by Congress to pay reparations to Japanese Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For human rights activist Grace Shimizu, it was the 1990 reunion of Peruvian Japanese internees in San Francisco that sparked what has become an eight-year "labor of love" to win justice for them. Her passion has turned a good portion of her El Cerritos home, which she shares with her aging parents, into an office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifty-six years after Alicia Nishimoto and Carmen Mochizuki were forced from their homes in Peru and deported to American internment camps, an apology may finally be nearing from their kidnapper: the U.S. government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1998 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to settle unfinished business, a delegation of Japanese Americans left for Washington, D.C., on Tuesday to lobby Congress for redress for Latin Americans of Japanese descent who were detained and forced into U.S. prison camps during World War II. The delegation also plans to lobby on behalf of Japanese American railroad and mine workers who, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, were abruptly fired from jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1997 | JACK LEONARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With only a year left before the federal government stops reparations to Japanese Americans who suffered internment and other discrimination during World War II, several civil rights groups Monday complained that about 3,300 people are being unfairly denied redress. Roughly 80,000 individuals have received written apologies and cash payments of $20,000 apiece since the reparations program began nine years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001 | MICHELLE KOIDIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
His brow creased, Art Shibayama gazes across a wide green field strewn with slabs of concrete. The barracks that housed families like his are gone. So are the barbed wire and the armed guards. Still, a recent visit to this chunk of flat South Texas land stirs painful memories more than 50 years old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1997 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There are certain childhood memories that still haunt Phil Shigekuni, like the time his mother and grandparents were forced to sell nearly everything they owned in their Los Angeles home, and when he was awakened at night by the sound of people urinating into pails at the Santa Anita racetrack. For the North Hills resident, both are vivid reminders of the U.S.
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