Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJapanese Los Angeles
IN THE NEWS

Japanese Los Angeles

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG and JOCELYN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When a magnitude 7.5 earthquake cracked buildings and claimed lives in Southern Mexico on Thursday, Spanish-language news stations in Los Angeles went live with coverage, including a statement from Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo. When, about the same time, a nuclear accident sent radiation spilling out of a uranium processing plant in Japan, workers in Japanese businesses in Los Angeles dropped what they were doing and went to the Internet.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a swift, brutal murder--a symbol, it seemed, of Los Angeles violence at its very worst. Two Japanese tourists--a husband and wife--were gunned down in an apparent robbery in 1981 as they snapped photographs near the Music Center. Kazumi Miura, 28, was shot dead. Her husband, Kazuyoshi, escaped with only a wound to the leg, receiving an outpouring of sympathy here and throughout Japan.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989
Sixty-thousand dollars for a Japanese version of the Hollywood Walk of Fame was approved Wednesday by the Los Angeles Harbor Department's Board of Commissioners as a gift to Nagoya, Japan, the sister city of Los Angeles. The money will be used to buy 25 prefabricated stars to be placed in Los Angeles Square in Nagoya. The gift is intended to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Nagoya's sister-city relationship with Los Angeles and also to mark Nagoya's centennial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1988 | KENNETH T. YAMADA, Times Staff Writer
Shin Asai and Hiromi Okiyama stood before the Rev. Harry Taffel as he married them in an empty Rancho Palos Verdes chapel. Unable to understand English, they waited for Taffel's cue before pronouncing the words they had practiced over and over again--"I will." The couple had arrived in Los Angeles from Japan just 24 hours before, beginning an odyssey of wedding preparations: clothes fittings, a first-time look at the church, an initial meeting with the minister and a rehearsal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley, on a tourism-promoting visit here on Tuesday, reiterated his call for the resignation of Police Chief Daryl F. Gates. But his main message to the Japanese was that Los Angeles is a "safe city." At a news conference, Bradley complained that many Japanese view Los Angeles as "a dangerous city" plagued by drive-by shootings and gang wars that make residents "feel insecure." The mayor called such an impression a "myth."
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | HILLARY MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a treasure hunt that links popular Japanese culture to dark times in U.S.-Japan relations, a team of experts arrived in Los Angeles this week to search for paintings by Yumeji, one of Japan's most popular 20th-Century artists, who had a brief Southern California sojourn. The search for the lost works is a race against time: The last of the immigrants who knew of Yumeji and bought his art are dying, taking their secrets with them.
NEWS
March 30, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having endured the effects of riots and earthquakes, Orange County tourist officials say they are frustrated by the battering their $4.8-billion industry has taken following problems in Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1990 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were times this month when Japanese tour leader Kyoko Oyama felt that the direction things were going was from bad to worse, rather than eastward from Tokyo to Los Angeles. Oyama operates a small English language school in Japan and, for the last three summers, has escorted students to Los Angeles to stay in local homes. The idea is for the youngsters to absorb English by soaking up American culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1999 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a contentious membership meeting at the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo last fall, board member Frances Hashimoto lamented: "I never thought Japanese were that confrontational." To Hashimoto, who grew up in Little Tokyo and runs her family's confectionary there, the public airing of simmering disagreements between Japanese-born immigrants and Japanese Americans over the operation of the landmark cultural center seemed almost un-Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1996 | PETER NOAH
Police have cracked down on a string of costly robberies that plagued Japanese tourists in Little Tokyo from June to October. An average of three losses per week--each approaching $5,000 in cash, jewelry and camera equipment--were stamped out by a community education program. A monthlong police audit of the crimes after a community meeting in October showed dramatic results: Not a single robbery involving Japanese was reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A San Pedro gang member was sentenced to death Monday for the 1994 carjacking murders of two Marymount College film students from Japan, where the incident prompted sharp criticism of Los Angeles' "gun culture." Raymond Oscar "Mugsy" Butler, 21, twitched nervously as a Long Beach Superior Court judge upheld a jury's recommendation that he be put to death rather than spend the rest of his life in prison for the execution-style slayings of Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura, both 19.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1996 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early morning, the dusty baseball diamond in Boyle Heights' Evergreen Park is carefully marked off with masking tape and transformed into a field for gateball, a traditional Japanese form of croquet. About 15 members of Eastside and downtown gateball clubs gather on the edge of the field watching the play. Traffic rushes by on 4th Street and a group of young boys scramble for a basketball on a nearby court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1996 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A San Pedro gang member was convicted in the execution-style murders of two Marymount College students from Japan, crimes that stunned that country and prompted condolence calls from President Clinton and U.S. diplomats. After about four hours of deliberations, a Long Beach Superior Court jury found Raymond Oscar "Mugsy" Butler, 21, guilty on two counts of first-degree murder. Butler faces the death penalty or life in prison without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | HILLARY MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a treasure hunt that links popular Japanese culture to dark times in U.S.-Japan relations, a team of experts arrived in Los Angeles this week to search for paintings by Yumeji, one of Japan's most popular 20th-Century artists, who had a brief Southern California sojourn. The search for the lost works is a race against time: The last of the immigrants who knew of Yumeji and bought his art are dying, taking their secrets with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As he wolfed down a tuna salad sandwich on Tuesday afternoon, Yoshimitsu Morishita reflected on why he had just traveled 5,500 miles to study English at a former girls parochial school in Studio City. "I want to play at many things, in many places," the 17-year-old Japanese high schooler said with the help of an interpreter in his new school's cafeteria. "I want to see Disneyland, Grand Canyon, Universal Studios."
BUSINESS
February 11, 1991 | TERESA WATANABE
Don't expect Hiroyuki Saito of Mitsui & Co. to say yes when he means no, a perceived characteristic of Japanese communication. When he was tapped to initiate corporate citizenship in the Japanese business community in Los Angeles in 1986, he said yes--and meant yes. "I want to act. I do not want to listen, promise and do nothing. When someone asks me a question, I respond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Little Tokyo, traditional heart of Los Angeles' Japanese community, anxious shopkeepers and visitors closely examined copies of Japanese newspapers filled with graphic accounts of destruction. Shop windows displayed bulletins bearing the latest word from back home, while residents monitored television and radio accounts of calamity in a nation known for its sense of order.
NEWS
January 8, 1995
A Japanese tourist was reunited with his family after disappearing for two days early last week. Toshiharu Sakurai, 52, left the Intercontinental Hotel on Jan. 1 for his daily 20-minute stroll but, unfamiliar with the area, he lost his way and ended up wandering city streets for 13 hours. The Osaka native was taken to Martin Luther King Jr.-Drew Medical Center that evening after paramedics received a report that a man was acting strangely and picked him up on South 93rd Street, police said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|