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BUSINESS
January 17, 1992 | JANE APPLEGATE
President Bush's recent trip to Japan, dampened by his bout with the flu and tense discussions with big-business leaders, prompted many small-business owners to wonder whether he might have fared better if he'd taken a group of open-minded entrepreneurs along. Knowing how tough it is for big business to crack the Japanese market, is there any hope for a small business? The answer is yes--if you are patient, flexible and willing to learn how business is really done in Japan. "In the U.S.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
California auto sales are rebounding from the recession at a faster pace than much of the country, according to industry data released Thursday. California's new vehicle registrations increased 14.6% during the first nine months of this year compared with the same period a year earlier. That's greater than the 10.3% national average, according to the California New Car Dealers Assn. "Serious car buyers are returning to the market and fueling the California auto industry's slow but steady recovery," said Peter Welch, the trade group's president.
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BUSINESS
May 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The AFLAC duck is going to Japan this month with a softer quack. In commercials designed for the Japanese market, AFLAC has ditched comedian Gilbert Gottfried's abrasive quacking of the Columbus, Ga.-based insurance company's name. Instead, a Japanese actor portrays the duck with a more soothing tone. "The Japanese culture does not like to be yelled at," AFLAC spokeswoman Laura Kane said. "Gilbert might be a little over the top." Gottfried's voice will remain in U.S.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2007 | Allison Hoffman, The Associated Press
Pacific bluefin tuna leave Japan's coast and swim east at breakneck speed to school in North American coastal waters. Many of them return on nonstop flights from Los Angeles as slabs of fresh toro, the "foie gras of the sea," fattened, refrigerated and ready for the sashimi knives. The transformation happens in underwater pens that are 150 feet wide and 45 feet deep, where wild-caught bluefin are fattened on fresh sardines to develop the buttery texture prized in Japan.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1989 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Japanese real estate investors can let their fingers do the walking. A new magazine pitched to them, California Real Estate Guide, will come off the presses in May. Based in Costa Mesa, the guide will feature ads in Japanese on California commercial buildings and residences. The magazine says it will have a mailing list of 2,500 real estate companies, banks, trading firms and individuals in Japan.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA
It can be boom or bust for a U.S. fad in the mercurial Japanese market. Take the example of Murrey & Sons Co., a Los Angeles billiard table maker. When the film "Color of Money," starring Paul Newman and Tom Cruz, hit Japanese theaters in January, 1987, the Japanese went crazy over billiards, the game played in the movie. They wanted Murrey pool tables in particular. "We supplied our tables to Disney/Touchstone for the movie," explained Patrick W. Murrey, vice president, sales and marketing.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Once again a visit to Washington by the Prime Minister of Japan has come and gone, with toasts to amity and pledges of cooperation. But if you're an average American you're confused--or bored--by the rhetoric on both sides. President Clinton and his aides talked tough--but actions such as calling for a lower-valued dollar are not going to erase the trade deficit with Japan, although they could attract more Japanese investment to the United States.
NEWS
July 14, 1996 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lowriders, those street-hugging cars with hydraulic lifts, are famous for being made in the 'hood, pieced together by backyard enthusiasts and body shops from South-Central to East Los Angeles. But now they have reached international status, becoming inner-city Los Angeles' top export to Japan. The most coveted of the customized classics--the early '60s Chevy Impala convertibles that cost $5,000 to $15,000 on the streets here--are being spruced up and sold in Japan for $25,000 to $35,000 and up.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1985 | Associated Press
A. T. Cross Co. doesn't expect to be exporting many more of its high-priced pens because of Japan's recent import-promotion campaign. The Lincoln, R.I.-based company cracked the Japanese market years ago, with lots of local help. "You can sell your goods in Japan, provided they are of top quality," says J. John Lawler, vice president of the Lincoln., R.I., company that has become No. 1 in Japan's "luxury pen" market.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
IKEA is hoping to be big in Japan by thinking small. When the Swedish furnishings giant opens up anew in Tokyo today -- 20 years after suffering a rare failure in the challenging market on its first try -- the company hopes to show it has mastered the key to winning over Japanese customers: small-space living. "Small-space living will be a characteristic throughout the entire store," said Tommy Kullberg, the head of IKEA's Japan division.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2006 | From the Associated Press
IKEA is hoping to be big in Japan by thinking small. When the Swedish furnishings giant opens up anew in Tokyo today -- 20 years after suffering a rare failure in the challenging market on its first try -- the company hopes to show it has mastered the key to winning over Japanese customers: small-space living. "Small-space living will be a characteristic throughout the entire store," said Tommy Kullberg, the head of IKEA's Japan division.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2005 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
DaimlerChrysler on Friday sold its remaining 12.4% stake in struggling Mitsubishi Motors Corp. to Goldman Sachs for an undisclosed amount, ending an unsuccessful attempt to profit from the Japanese auto industry. The German-American automaker once owned 37% of Mitsubishi as part of a strategy to become a dominant international force in the industry. Five years ago, DaimlerChrysler Chief Executive Juergen Schrempp paid at least $2.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2004 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Sony Corp. surprised the consumer electronics and video game industries Wednesday when it unveiled the sticker price for its upcoming PSP hand-held game device -- under $200, far less than expected. That suggests that the Japanese consumer electronics giant plans to cut an aggressive path in mobile entertainment, a fast-growing market carved up by cellphones, music players and a cacophony of souped-up devices that deliver digital movies and music in pocket-size packages.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The AFLAC duck is going to Japan this month with a softer quack. In commercials designed for the Japanese market, AFLAC has ditched comedian Gilbert Gottfried's abrasive quacking of the Columbus, Ga.-based insurance company's name. Instead, a Japanese actor portrays the duck with a more soothing tone. "The Japanese culture does not like to be yelled at," AFLAC spokeswoman Laura Kane said. "Gilbert might be a little over the top." Gottfried's voice will remain in U.S.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2001 | Reuters
OpenTV Corp. said Tuesday it has agreed to develop interactive television services with Japan's major cable TV operator, Jupiter Telecommunications Co., gaining entry to the Japanese TV market. Mountain View-based OpenTV will work with Jupiter's J-Com Broadband unit to develop on-demand news and other services.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Japanese stocks fell in early trading today with the Nikkei touching a 17-year low. But the banking sector was buoyed by optimism that Financial Affairs Minister Hakuo Yanagisawa will accept a request by the International Monetary Fund to inspect Japan's banking system. At midmorning the Nikkei-225 stock average was down 29.41 points, or 0.3%, to 10,684.10 on the heels of a four-day, 5% drop. The Topix index of all shares on the Tokyo Stock Exchange's first section was off 0.5% to 1,097.92.
NEWS
February 12, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa failed Friday to resolve their deep differences on key trade issues, and U.S. officials began considering specific retaliatory and punitive measures intended to force Japan to open its markets to American products. "The reality is, we'll take some action," a senior Administration official said, holding out little hope that--barring a Japanese concession--a trade clash could be avoided.
NEWS
May 29, 2000 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
It was proposed by an American diplomat in Tokyo. It was embraced by a risk-taking Japanese railroad executive. It was facilitated by a state trade official who knew an organic rice farmer in Chico. As a result, beginning next year, 17 million passengers who ride the bullet trains and express commuter lines of Japan's biggest railway will be offered traditional meals--the famous bento boxes--produced, cooked and packaged entirely in California.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this irrigated desert where the nation's cherry harvest begins in late spring, Arden Kashishian wanders the dusty fields searching for a taste of his childhood. The cherries that catch his fancy hang as big and round as ever, and they have made the turn from pink to glossy red. But Kashishian is a picky man looking for something akin to alchemy beneath the shine.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After bidding sayonara to the Japanese market in 1998, MTV said this week it is returning with different partners under a different structure that will give it much greater control. "We never exited anywhere else before, and we did here," said Gregory J. Ricca, executive vice president of MTV Networks, in an interview in Tokyo. "But now the business is stronger [and] we're managing our own destiny." MTV will take over the production facilities, staff, 24-hour time slot and 2.
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