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NEWS
January 30, 1992 | Baltimore Sun
Historians and economists may debate for years whether President Bush's trip here this month helped or harmed his cause. But the trip gave the Japanese something every language needs, a socially acceptable verb for one of life's unspeakable miseries. In the wake of the President's gastrointestinal woes at a dinner hosted by Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, a new word has been coined-- bushusuru: to do a Bush. As in this conversation in the Roppongi night club district, between two men.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2011 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
In the annals of smuggling, Los Angeles International Airport has seen it all ? lizards in luggage, songbirds strapped to a passenger's legs, boxes of tarantulas and two pygmy monkeys hidden in a traveler's pants.                    Now, officials said, they have recorded another milestone in the animal kingdom ? smuggled turtles. Authorities said two Japanese men were arrested with more than 50 live rare turtles, from Chinese big-headed turtles to Indian Star tortoises, packed neatly inside snack food boxes.
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OPINION
August 6, 1989 | Kan Ito, Kan Ito is the editor of Inside Japan, a newsletter published in Arlington, Va. He has recently been an adviser to Japan's Democratic Socialist Party
While 1 billion Chinese are living under fear of tyranny and ruthless persecution, we Japanese are busily gossiping about how many geishas and barmaids Prime Minister Sosuke Uno actually fondled. How embarrassingly peaceful Japan is.
BOOKS
March 18, 2007 | Christine Smallwood, Christine Smallwood is the assistant literary editor at the Nation and co-editor of the Crier magazine.
THE juxtaposition of the words "Japan" and "sex" inevitably conjures up images of a buttoned-up salaryman lavishing gifts on a teenager in enjo kosai, or "assisted dating"; ignoring his wife at home, he visits a sex club and buries his head in explicit manga or buys a schoolgirl's used underthings from a vending machine. The news is everywhere: Japanese men have double lives! They go crazy for sex tourism! Half have paid for sex!
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
Japanese politics has never been sexier. Ordinarily the domain of dull, gray men who strike murky deals behind closed doors and shun provocative issues, the political arena has been transformed in recent weeks by a former geisha. That's right, a geisha, one of those artistes and sometime concubines of the fading "willow world," a major icon of Japanese exotica along with samurai, sumo wrestlers and Mt. Fuji. Picture her forlorn and disgruntled. She says that Sosuke Uno, the mild-mannered statesman in horned-rimmed glasses who in early June became Japan's 18th postwar prime minister, paid her about $21,000 in a brief and furtive sexual liaison four years ago. Pervasiveness of Affairs No problem, normally, considering the pervasiveness of extra-marital affairs among prominent Japanese men and the traditional prestige of keeping a pricey mistress.
WORLD
December 17, 2003 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
A Chinese court today sentenced two people to life in prison and 12 others to terms as long as 15 years for organizing a sex party in mid-September for several hundred Japanese tourists. "This is very harsh compared to similar cases," said Wu Ge, director of the Constitutional and Human Rights Center at Tsinghua University. "This case is very serious and on a large scale, and the government paid close attention to the case. The general public has been quite angry about this."
NEWS
October 30, 1986
A Japanese gangster's grenade may have exploded accidentally, causing the violent plunge of a Thai jetliner that injured 62 people Sunday, Japanese press reports said. Investigators have said they believe an explosion occurred on the A-300 Airbus before a loss of pressure caused the wild descent and an emergency landing at Osaka, Japan. Kyodo News Service said metal fragments found in a rear toilet may have come from a U.S.-type fragmentation grenade.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1991 | JOHN E. WOODRUFF, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The world's greatest economic powerhouse is staffed by some of the world's weakest men. From that simple but stark assumption, Japan's movie-directing sensation of the 1980s has fashioned "Ageman," the film he hopes will carry his momentum into the 1990s. "Japan has not yet invented fatherhood as a part of its culture," filmmaker Juzo Itami said. "So where most societies have three main figures--father, mother and child--Japan has only two, and men grow up to be children."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2003 | Michelle Munn, Special to The Times
Sometimes tradition is just not enough. Or so Koji Wada has learned. Wada, the owner of Kasuri Dyeworks in downtown Berkeley, is spending this week closing his shop, unrolling, rerolling and packing the bolts of ornate fabrics that have been his business for more than 30 years. The soft plumes of silk suspended in Wada's shop are used to make kimonos, the traditional dress of Japanese men and women. Decades ago, Japanese men began abandoning kimonos for Western dress.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Attitudes toward work and self-reliance, rather than the availability or adequacy of pensions, appear to explain why Japanese and American men continue working after age 60 far more than British and French men. That finding, sociologist Alex Inkeles of the Hoover Institution said Tuesday, has important implications for businesses and governments, especially as the Baby Boom generation gets older.
WORLD
December 17, 2003 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
A Chinese court today sentenced two people to life in prison and 12 others to terms as long as 15 years for organizing a sex party in mid-September for several hundred Japanese tourists. "This is very harsh compared to similar cases," said Wu Ge, director of the Constitutional and Human Rights Center at Tsinghua University. "This case is very serious and on a large scale, and the government paid close attention to the case. The general public has been quite angry about this."
WORLD
September 30, 2003 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writer
In a case that has drawn wide attention from Chinese officials and anti-Japanese anger in China's Internet chat rooms, authorities said Monday they were investigating reports that a hotel was overrun for a few days earlier this month by hundreds of Japanese tourists and Chinese prostitutes. Many details of the incident, which reportedly ended Sept. 18 -- the anniversary of a 1931 attack that marked the beginning of Japan's brutal occupation of China -- remain unclear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2003 | Michelle Munn, Special to The Times
Sometimes tradition is just not enough. Or so Koji Wada has learned. Wada, the owner of Kasuri Dyeworks in downtown Berkeley, is spending this week closing his shop, unrolling, rerolling and packing the bolts of ornate fabrics that have been his business for more than 30 years. The soft plumes of silk suspended in Wada's shop are used to make kimonos, the traditional dress of Japanese men and women. Decades ago, Japanese men began abandoning kimonos for Western dress.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The provocative title is a tip-off: Richard Setlowe's fifth novel is a thriller with a theme. He asserts that the mass "seduction" of Japanese women by U.S. servicemen--continuing long after the formal military occupation of Japan ended in 1952--had profound effects on Japanese society. It was bitterly resented by Japanese men, he says, and is a hidden cause of friction between the two countries even today.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JOSEPH COLEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Graduate student Satoshi Okada finds himself at fast-food joints too often these days, hunched over a calorie-packed meal of teriyaki burgers and fries. The result? He's one of a growing new breed in Japan: the overweight man. "In short, I eat a lot," said Okada, 22, who's now in a weight-loss program at his university to shed some of the 191 pounds he has amassed on his 5-foot-8 frame. Okada's not the only one.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | Baltimore Sun
Historians and economists may debate for years whether President Bush's trip here this month helped or harmed his cause. But the trip gave the Japanese something every language needs, a socially acceptable verb for one of life's unspeakable miseries. In the wake of the President's gastrointestinal woes at a dinner hosted by Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, a new word has been coined-- bushusuru: to do a Bush. As in this conversation in the Roppongi night club district, between two men.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1989 | GARY J. KATZENSTEIN, GARY J. KATZENSTEIN, a New York-based management and information systems consultant, has written a book, "Funny Business: An Outsider's Year in Japan," describing his experience at Sony
What would you do if your boss told you that you were being transferred to Saudi Arabia for three years? And that you would be leaving in two weeks, despite your wife's being eight months pregnant? Would you ask to discuss the matter further with your boss? Would you threaten to or actually leave the company if management were not more understanding? Not if you're a male Japanese white-collar worker. Because Japanese men have none of those options, despite the conventional wisdom about Japanese management's virtues.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | JOSEPH COLEMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Graduate student Satoshi Okada finds himself at fast-food joints too often these days, hunched over a calorie-packed meal of teriyaki burgers and fries. The result? He's one of a growing new breed in Japan: the overweight man. "In short, I eat a lot," said Okada, 22, who's now in a weight-loss program at his university to shed some of the 191 pounds he has amassed on his 5-foot-8 frame. Okada's not the only one.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1991 | JOHN E. WOODRUFF, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The world's greatest economic powerhouse is staffed by some of the world's weakest men. From that simple but stark assumption, Japan's movie-directing sensation of the 1980s has fashioned "Ageman," the film he hopes will carry his momentum into the 1990s. "Japan has not yet invented fatherhood as a part of its culture," filmmaker Juzo Itami said. "So where most societies have three main figures--father, mother and child--Japan has only two, and men grow up to be children."
BUSINESS
December 10, 1989 | GARY J. KATZENSTEIN, GARY J. KATZENSTEIN, a New York-based management and information systems consultant, has written a book, "Funny Business: An Outsider's Year in Japan," describing his experience at Sony
What would you do if your boss told you that you were being transferred to Saudi Arabia for three years? And that you would be leaving in two weeks, despite your wife's being eight months pregnant? Would you ask to discuss the matter further with your boss? Would you threaten to or actually leave the company if management were not more understanding? Not if you're a male Japanese white-collar worker. Because Japanese men have none of those options, despite the conventional wisdom about Japanese management's virtues.
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