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NEWS
July 17, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
North Korea has announced that Japanese wives living in that country may be allowed to visit their homeland, which would remove a major irritant in relations between Tokyo and the Communist nation. A statement on Wednesday night carried by the official Korean Central News Agency, monitored in Tokyo, said North Korea would "take steps" to allow some women "of advanced years" to visit Japan.
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NEWS
July 17, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
North Korea has announced that Japanese wives living in that country may be allowed to visit their homeland, which would remove a major irritant in relations between Tokyo and the Communist nation. A statement on Wednesday night carried by the official Korean Central News Agency, monitored in Tokyo, said North Korea would "take steps" to allow some women "of advanced years" to visit Japan.
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WORLD
November 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Japanese officials returned from North Korea with what Pyongyang says are the remains of a Japanese woman kidnapped 26 years ago and possessions of seven other abducted Japanese citizens. North Korea has admitted kidnapping 13 Japanese in the 1970s and 1980s to teach North Korean spies about Japanese language and culture. The regime released five in 2002 but has said the eight others died.
WORLD
September 13, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Japan's coast guard has found several bodies and a small boat probably designed for amphibious landings on a suspected North Korean spy ship it recovered from the East China Sea, media reports said. Four bodies were in the ship and on the ocean floor, bringing the total number found to eight, Kyodo News agency said. In addition to a small boat, searchers found an antiaircraft missile launcher, an automatic rifle and other weapons. The ship sank after a gun battle with the coast guard Dec.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Korean President Kim Il Sung today met a top leader of Japan's ruling party for the first time and apparently agreed to release two Japanese fishermen North Korea has held as "spies" for seven years. He also was quoted as saying he hopes that Japan and North Korea, which have not had normal diplomatic ties since 1910, will become close not only in geographic proximity but also in dealings with each other.
WORLD
October 10, 2002 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Korea will permit five Japanese kidnapped more than two decades ago to visit their homeland next week, although their children born in the Communist nation will not be allowed to accompany them, Japanese officials said Wednesday. North Korea has said the five victims, whose trips will be paid for by the Japanese government, can stay only two weeks. The announcement came as Japanese and North Korean officials prepare for talks Oct.
WORLD
October 25, 2002 | From Associated Press
The drama of the Japanese abducted to North Korea took a new turn Thursday with the announcement that the five who are visiting Japan will stay indefinitely and hope that their families can join them. The announcement by Japan intensified the tug of war between Tokyo and its Communist neighbor. It threatened to add diplomatic complications to an extraordinary human tragedy that has left the abductees torn between the families they left in Japan decades ago and the families they formed in exile.
WORLD
May 30, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
One of the hottest-selling books here this spring is Ryu Murakami's "Get Out of the Peninsula," a novel set in 2010 that portrays a Japan in ruins, ravaged by economic and social collapse. Armies of homeless and unemployed have been cast adrift. Japan's alliance with America lies in tatters. Chinese and Indian criminal gangs run amok. But Murakami's main villains are a group of North Korean commandos.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A middle-aged woman, possibly a low-level official, erupted when she saw an American photographing chili peppers drying on a mat. "Coming from a foreign country, you can't take pictures of something like that!" she scolded, apparently upset because the mat with the peppers--used in this region's Korean cuisine--lay on an unpaved sidewalk.
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