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NEWS
January 2, 1985 | Associated Press
Japan on Tuesday lifted sanctions it imposed on North Korea in November, 1983, to protest a terrorist bombing in Rangoon, Burma, the previous month that killed 17 visiting South Korean officials. Japanese government officials may again travel to North Korea, and North Korean officials may enter Japan. Also lifted were bans on Japanese and North Korean diplomats' making contact in third countries.
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NEWS
December 23, 1999 | From Associated Press
Japanese and North Korean officials agreed Wednesday to continue talks on establishing diplomatic ties but were unable to announce plans for the start of formal negotiations. A Japanese Foreign Ministry official who attended the two sessions of talks spread over two days said the North Korean side showed a strong desire to improve relations with Tokyo. He said the parties agreed to meet early next year and will probably again hold the negotiations on neutral ground in Beijing.
WORLD
July 26, 2003 | From Reuters
North Korea says it is prepared to conduct a nuclear test unless the United States responds positively to its proposals for resolving concerns over Pyongyang's weapons ambitions, Japanese and North Korean sources were quoted as saying today. The Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun said this had been conveyed to U.S. special envoy Jack Pritchard by a North Korean official in a secret meeting this month.
WORLD
October 30, 2002 | From Reuters
Japan and North Korea held a contentious round of talks Tuesday on normalizing relations but remained far apart on the key issues of North Korea's nuclear arms program and Japanese citizens abducted decades ago. The two-day talks, the first full-scale negotiations between the countries in two years, are under an international spotlight as pressure mounts on the North Korean government to scrap a nuclear arms program it has pursued in violation of a 1994 agreement.
WORLD
October 10, 2002 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
North Korea will permit five Japanese kidnapped more than two decades ago to visit their homeland next week, although their children born in the Communist nation will not be allowed to accompany them, Japanese officials said Wednesday. North Korea has said the five victims, whose trips will be paid for by the Japanese government, can stay only two weeks. The announcement came as Japanese and North Korean officials prepare for talks Oct.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese warships firing warning shots and military aircraft dropping explosives chased two suspected spy ships in the Sea of Japan for more than 24 hours but gave up Wednesday when the vessels sped into North Korean territorial waters, the government said.
WORLD
October 31, 2002 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
North Korea defiantly refused to abandon its nuclear weapons program Wednesday, leaving little hope of an early resolution in its standoff with Washington, Tokyo and Seoul. During two days of normalization talks between Japanese and North Korean officials in Kuala Lumpur, the Malaysian capital, North Korea turned down Japan's request to end its uranium enrichment program.
NEWS
August 23, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could bring much-needed aid to food-strapped North Korea, Japanese and North Korean diplomats agreed Friday to reopen long-stalled negotiations to normalize relations between the two countries. After two days of meetings in the Chinese capital, diplomats agreed to an agenda of ambassadorial-level discussions leading to an eventual exchange of diplomatic recognition by the governments in Tokyo and Pyongyang.
WORLD
June 25, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly two decades of tears, anguish and bureaucratic frustration, the Arimoto family finally met their daughter's kidnapper. For years, they'd imagined what they would say to the person responsible for taking their round-faced Keiko away so many years before. How they'd convey the pain and anger they'd suffered, and the fear as they'd imagined the worst, before finally learning years later that the 23-year-old had been lured to Communist North Korea--where she may still be alive.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appears to be a major change in policy, North Korea on Thursday proposed opening talks with Japan in early November to establish full diplomatic relations. Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu welcomed the move and said Japan will consult closely with South Korea, where an explosion of anger against Tokyo erupted immediately.
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