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Japanese Officials

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WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Japanese officials have told a U.N. atomic watchdog group that there was an initial increase in radioactivity around a nuclear plant Saturday following the 8.9-magnitude earthquake, but that levels "have been observed to lessen in recent hours. " Officials at the International Atomic Energy Agency released a statement in Vienna on Saturday saying they had been informed by Japanese authorities that an explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi plant occurred outside the primary containment vessel.
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WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Yuriko Nagano and Julie Makinen
TOKYO -- Hiroshi Kyoso says he values Japan's relationship with the United States highly and feels warmly about Washington's new ambassador to Tokyo, Caroline Kennedy. But as the 90-year-old veteran of World War II arrived Wednesday morning to pray at Tokyo's Yasukuni shrine -- a controversial site that commemorates nearly 2.5 million of Japan's war dead including 14 top war criminals -- Kyoso said he saw no connection between the shrine and Japan's ties with America. If a Japanese leader visits Yasukuni, he said, it's only natural.
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WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Japanese officials are girding the nation for months of hardship, warning about ongoing rolling electricity blackouts and asking quake refugees to move elsewhere in the country, as it became clear that even temporary homes won't be quickly built. About 380,000 people were living in shelters. In Miyagi prefecture, one of the worst-hit, Gov. Yoshihiro Murai asked survivors to relocate, because replacement housing would not be ready for as long as a year, local media said. Photos: In Japan, life amid crisis "Living conditions will improve if they move away.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Group of 20 finance chiefs sharpened their stance against governments trying to influence exchange rates as they sought to tame speculation about a global currency war without singling out Japan for criticism. Two days of talks between G-20 finance ministers and central bankers ended in Moscow on Sunday with a pledge not to "target our exchange rates for competitive purposes," according to a statement. That's stronger than their position three months ago and leaves Japanese officials under pressure to stop publicly giving guidance on their currency's value.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1985
U.S. Trade Representative Clayton Yeutter and Japanese officials agreed to hold separate talks on semiconductors, one of a number of issues contributing to trade friction between the two nations, Japanese officials said. In Tokyo for four days of trade talks, Yeutter also raised several other issues, pushing Japan to buy more U.S. aircraft and soda ash, use American auto transport ships and cut tariffs on paper products, aluminum and optical fibers.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Japanese officials today called for central bank intervention and possible joint action with Western nations to halt the slide of the U.S. dollar, which plunged to record lows on currency exchanges. The dollar closed at 148.80 yen after falling as low as 148.40 during the day. It was the first time the dollar had closed below 150 yen since modern exchange rates were established in the late 1940s. Dealers estimated that the Bank of Japan bought between $1.
NEWS
September 26, 1986 | ANDREW HORVAT, Times Staff Writer
A Japanese Foreign Ministry spokesman said Thursday that "it is not necessary" to provide black and Hispanic congressmen a copy of controversial remarks by Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone saying that the U.S. educational level is pulled down by large numbers of blacks and Hispanics. Leaders of black and Hispanic caucuses in Congress have urged the Japanese government to release the full text of Nakasone's speech Monday to a study group of junior members of his Liberal Democratic Party.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1986 | ANDREW HORVAT, Times Staff Writer
Cigarettes, machine tools and a multibillion-dollar airport project have replaced computer chips as the main flash points in U.S.-Japan trade friction this month. In the wake of the U.S.-Japan settlement on July 31 of a longstanding trade dispute over semiconductors, officials of the two countries are negotiating on all of these subjects here this week as well as on car parts and telecommunications equipment. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1990 | BRUCE G. IWASAKI, Bruce G. Iwasaki is a member of the National Coalition for Redress and R e parations in Los Angeles. and
Late last month, the Japanese minister of justice, Seiroku Kajiyama, compared prostitution in Tokyo to black people moving into white neighborhoods in America. Both, he said, "ruin the atmosphere." Obviously, the rulers of Japan have learned nothing from similar remarks that embarrassed their nation.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Geological Survey officials have chosen a name for the 9.0 temblor that struck Japan last week. They're calling it the Tohoku earthquake ? shortened from the original name used in Japan. Tohoku is a region in the northern part of Honshu, Japan's largest island. Though the region ? encompassing six of the island's northernmost prefectures ? sits north of the massive quake's offshore epicenter, it became its namesake because it takes up much of the area shaken by the earthquake's approximately 250-mile-long rupture area.
WORLD
December 31, 2012 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Newly installed Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was quoted Monday saying that he would revisit a 1995 apology made by his nation's government for suffering caused in World War II. Although other Japanese officials have suggested retracting apologies for wartime horrors, the words coming from Abe himself are bound to inflame anti-Japanese sentiment in China and the Korean peninsula and put the new government off to a bad start with...
WORLD
March 29, 2011 | By Kenji Hall and Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
They sleep with just one blanket apiece anywhere there's space — in a conference room, in the hallway, near the bathroom. Because deliveries of supplies are limited, they get by on very little food: Breakfast is packages of high-calorie emergency crackers and a small carton of vegetable juice; dinner consists of a small bag of "magic rice" (just add bottled water) and a can of chicken, mackerel or curry. There is no lunch — handing out a noontime meal would be too complicated in the crowded two-story building.
WORLD
March 27, 2011 | By Julie Makinen and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
For the better part of Sunday, media outlets in Japan and around the world carried scary-sounding news about radiation at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant's No. 2 reactor. In a typical report, Japanese broadcaster NHK said: "Power company says it has detected radioactive materials 10 million times normal levels. " After nightfall came the mea culpa. There was a "mistake in the measurement of the assessment" of radiation in a building near the reactor, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said on its website.
WORLD
March 25, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Japanese officials are considering introducing daylight saving time to help cope with severe power shortages that likely will last for months. Japan has resisted daylight saving time for nearly 60 years, dumping the practice after the U.S. occupation ended. While Japanese politicians have attempted to bring back daylight saving time in recent years, skeptics have feared it would just keep workers in their offices longer. But according to Kyodo News agency, Japanese industry minister Banri Kaieda said bringing back daylight saving time may help avoid major blackouts in the summer, when energy consumption peaks because of scorching temperatures.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
Japanese officials are girding the nation for months of hardship, warning about ongoing rolling electricity blackouts and asking quake refugees to move elsewhere in the country, as it became clear that even temporary homes won't be quickly built. About 380,000 people were living in shelters. In Miyagi prefecture, one of the worst-hit, Gov. Yoshihiro Murai asked survivors to relocate, because replacement housing would not be ready for as long as a year, local media said. Photos: In Japan, life amid crisis "Living conditions will improve if they move away.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Japan's top government spokesman said Friday that the country's leadership was overwhelmed by last week's earthquake and tsunami, which slowed its ability to respond to the following humanitarian crisis and nuclear emergency. "The unprecedented scale of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan, frankly speaking, were among many things that happened that had not been anticipated under our disaster management contingency plans," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said, according to the Associated Press.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | United Press International
A Panamanian tanker struck and sank a Japanese freighter Sunday off the coast of Japan, killing one seaman and leaving another missing, Japanese officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Seoul Hwang Pyung-woo sometimes lies awake at night cataloging in his mind South Korea's missing national treasures ? the historic texts and stolen artifacts displayed in a Tokyo museum, a home in Paris, a university library in California. "I can't sleep, I'm so outraged by this," said Hwang, 50, a historian and director of Korea Cultural Heritage Policy Research Institute and one of those at the forefront of a burgeoning movement here to recover historic items removed from the country during successive waves of foreign invasion and nearly half a century of Japanese colonial rule.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times
There is no sign that harmful levels of radiation are drifting into Tokyo or other large cities in Japan, according to United Nations and World Health Organization officials. "Dose rates in Tokyo and other cities remain far from levels which would require action; in other words, they are not dangerous to human health," Graham Andrew, an official with the United Nations' International Atomic Energy Agency, told reporters Friday, according to Reuters. Photos: In Japan, life amid crisis World Health Organization officials in Switzerland gave a similar assessment a day earlier.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
-- As the crisis continues to unfold at the Fukushima No. 1 (Daiichi) nuclear power plant, a growing disparity between Japanese and U.S. attitudes toward the problem is becoming apparent. Whereas Japanese authorities have generally been restrained in their pronouncements about the risks, American officials are becoming increasingly vocal. Japanese officials, for example, have consistently said the amount of radiation escaping from the damaged power plant remains relatively small.
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